Tag Archive: tomato

The Tomato Lover’s Garden Heirloom Seed Collection

Heirloom tomatoes are a delightful sign of summer here at 1840 Farm.  Each year we plant over 100 heirloom tomato plants and wait, rather impatiently, for that first tomato to ripen.  When that moment finally arrives, it is cause for a celebration of the most delicious kind.

Last year, we offered a collection of four of our favorite heirloom tomato varieties to our customers.  This year, our Tomato Lover’s Garden features six of our favorite heirloom tomato varieties:

Black Cherry
Costoluto Genovese
Green Zebra
Isis Candy Cherry
Mortgage Lifter
Purple Calabash

The Tomato Lover’s Garden Heirloom Seed Collection is available in The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.  The 2014 Heirloom Seed Collection is a collaboration between 1840 Farm and Fresh Eggs Daily.  Together, we have curated our favorite heirloom varieties into collections that are ideally suited for growing together.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.

1840 Farm

This year, 1840 Farm offers five heirloom seed collections for purchase. The 1840 Farm Favorites Garden includes six of our favorite varieties to plant in the gardens here at 1840 Farm. The Easy Keepers Garden includes four varieties that are perfect for the beginning gardener and can be sown directly into a small garden plot or containers. The Pollinators Garden features six flowering plants that will help to attract beneficial pollinators to your garden. Our Three Sisters Garden includes four packets of seed that allow you to enjoy delicious produce and an American history lesson as you put into practice one of the oldest forms of companion planting.   The Tomato Lover’s Garden features six of our favorite heirloom tomato varieties.

We invite you to join The 1840 Farm Community on Facebook and Fresh Eggs Daily on Facebook to share updates from your garden and keep up to date on what we’re harvesting from our heirloom gardens. We’ll also be sharing regular garden updates along with fresh, seasonal recipes in our 1840 Farm Community Newsletter and The Fresh Eggs Daily Newsletter.  In the meantime, you can view photos from the gardens at 1840 Farm by visiting our Garden Photo Tour.  More photos will be added as we progress through the 2014 growing season.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2014/03/the-tomato-lovers-garden-heirloom-seed-collection/

Mortgage Lifter Heirloom Tomato

This tomato comes with a story the likes of which legends are made.  It all starts with a man named M.C. Byles who friends affectionately called Charlie in West Virginia.  He ran his own radiator repair business and was struggling to make it through the Great Depression.  He took it upon himself, with no prior plant breeding experience mind you, to cross ten tomato plants with a German Johnson tomato.

Several years later, he had what he believed was the perfect tomato.  He sold seedlings for $1.00 each and the plants were soon so popular that gardeners drove as far as 200 miles to purchase his plants.  In only six years had earned the $6,000.00 needed to pay off the mortgage on his house.  The legend was born, the name “Mortgage Lifter” was earned and a delicious tomato was born.

This plant produces large, slightly flattened beefsteak type fruits.  It has an extremely meaty flesh and contains very few seeds.  These tomatoes have a tendency to develop cracks along their shoulders, but the flavor will not be affected. Ripe fruits weigh upwards of one pound each.  It is not uncommon for a plant to develop fruits that weigh three pounds each!

This is a truly delicious slicing tomato and is listed on Slow Food USA’s Ark of Taste.  Their description of the flavor is “a spicy flavor and low acidity. The taste starts off mild and then builds, with a long finish on the palate. It has a roasted, fruity and slightly salty flavor.”  We think you’ll agree that this tomato is as delicious as its story is unforgettable.

The Mortgage Lifter Heirloom Tomato is one of the six varieties included in our Tomato Lover’s Garden Heirloom Seed Collection available in The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.  The 2014 Heirloom Seed Collection is a collaboration between 1840 Farm and Fresh Eggs Daily.  Together, we have curated our favorite heirloom varieties into collections that are ideally suited for growing together.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.

1840 Farm

We invite you to join The 1840 Farm Community on Facebook and Fresh Eggs Daily on Facebook to share updates from your garden and keep up to date on what we’re harvesting from our heirloom gardens. We’ll also be sharing regular garden updates along with fresh, seasonal recipes in our 1840 Farm Community Newsletter and The Fresh Eggs Daily Newsletter.  In the meantime, you can view photos from the gardens at 1840 Farm by visiting our Garden Photo Tour.  More photos will be added as we progress through the 2014 growing season.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2014/03/mortgage-lifter-heirloom-tomato/

Isis Candy Cherry Heirloom Tomato

2006 was the first summer we lived at 1840 Farm.  That year, we planted a small garden with a handful of heirloom tomato varieties.  We were new to heirloom gardening and selected the varieties for that year’s garden in a very non-scientific manner.  We simply chose heirlooms with names that drew us to them.  A tomato named “Isis Candy Cherry” sounded beautiful and sweet, a combination that we couldn’t wait to watch ripen in our tiny garden.

We were thrilled when an Isis Candy Cherry was the very first tomato to ripen.  It was indeed beautiful and sweet.  Sliced in half, my children eagerly ate that first tomato while still warm from the sunshine.  We have been growing Isis Candy Cherry now for eight seasons and it is predictably the very first tomato that is ripe enough to harvest from our heirloom garden.

While its early ripening habit make this variety popular here at 1840 Farm, we would continue to plant it regardless.  The flavor of this tomato is the real reason it keeps finding its way into our tomato patch every year.  Knowing that it ripens in less than 70 days is merely icing on the proverbial cake.

These beautiful orbs are packed with sweet, jammy tomato flavor.  They ripen to a beautiful red-orange with lighter golden shoulders and a trademark starburst pattern on the blossom end of the fruit. This is the perfect tomato for the person in your life who doesn’t think that they like tomatoes.  One bite of this lovely heirloom should be all it takes to convince them that they love this tomato!

The Isis Candy Cherry Heirloom Tomato is one of the six varieties included in our Tomato Lover’s Garden Heirloom Seed Collection available in The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.  The 2014 Heirloom Seed Collection is a collaboration between 1840 Farm and Fresh Eggs Daily.  Together, we have curated our favorite heirloom varieties into collections that are ideally suited for growing together.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.

1840 Farm

We invite you to join The 1840 Farm Community on Facebook and Fresh Eggs Daily on Facebook to share updates from your garden and keep up to date on what we’re harvesting from our heirloom gardens. We’ll also be sharing regular garden updates along with fresh, seasonal recipes in our 1840 Farm Community Newsletter and The Fresh Eggs Daily Newsletter.  In the meantime, you can view photos from the gardens at 1840 Farm by visiting our Garden Photo Tour.  More photos will be added as we progress through the 2014 growing season.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2014/03/isis-candy-cherry-heirloom-tomato/

Green Zebra Heirloom Tomato

Of all the tomatoes we grow here at 1840 Farm, the Green Zebra is perhaps the most striking.  When fully ripe, each tomato is a fabulous bright green color with beautiful bright stripes.  In a  garden full of red, pink, purple, orange, and yellow, the Green Zebra stands out.  The brilliant color alone would be reason enough for me to plant these beautiful tomatoes every year.

This tomato isn’t just a pretty face, it’s also delicious.  The Green Zebra’s flavor is bright, slightly acidic, and tangy enough to be the star of in any dish.  These tomatoes make a wonderful addition to fresh salsas, tomato salads, and pastas.  The bright color and flavor of the Green Zebra are sure to brighten up any tomato dish served at your family table.

Some experts don’t classify the Green Zebra as an heirloom given its introduction to seed catalogs in the 1980s.  However, this tomato seems more ideally suited for classifying as an heirloom than in any other category.  Tom Wagner began developing this tomato by using four individual varieties back in the 1950s.  One of the tomatoes he used was the Evergreen, a medium sized and colored green tomato.

Unlike the terms “organic” or “non-GMO”, there is not a clear definition about what an heirloom variety can or cannot be, although there are certain characteristics that they share.  Heirlooms are open pollinated varieties that have been grown for a long period of time and passed down through the generations.  It is common for them to not have been used in large scale agricultural production.  Some people also require a variety to have been in existence for at least 50 years in order to be considered a true heirloom.

So, as you can see, if we work forward from the 1950s when the Green Zebra was created, it is clearly deserving of being considered an heirloom.  However, if we only calculate the age of this variety from the date it was first offered for sale, then we would still have a decade to wait until we could label it as an heirloom.

So, is the Green Zebra an heirloom?  I choose to think of this beautiful variety as an heirloom given the date of its creation.  I know that other gardeners prefer to calculate the age of this variety from the date is first appeared in a seed catalog.  To each their own, but either way, this variety is legendary and will soon have reached an age to be considered an heirloom by each and every gardener who enjoys its beauty and flavor in their gardens each summer.

The Green Zebra Heirloom Tomato is one of the six varieties included in our Tomato Lover’s Garden Heirloom Seed Collection available in The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.  The 2014 Heirloom Seed Collection is a collaboration between 1840 Farm and Fresh Eggs Daily.  Together, we have curated our favorite heirloom varieties into collections that are ideally suited for growing together.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.

1840 Farm

We invite you to join The 1840 Farm Community on Facebook and Fresh Eggs Daily on Facebook to share updates from your garden and keep up to date on what we’re harvesting from our heirloom gardens. We’ll also be sharing regular garden updates along with fresh, seasonal recipes in our 1840 Farm Community Newsletter and The Fresh Eggs Daily Newsletter.  In the meantime, you can view photos from the gardens at 1840 Farm by visiting our Garden Photo Tour.  More photos will be added as we progress through the 2014 growing season.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2014/03/green-zebra-heirloom-tomato/

Costoluto Genovese Heirloom Tomato

If you’re looking for a tomato to thrive in the summer heat, look no further.  The Costoluto Genovese variety hails from the Mediterranean.  For centuries, gardeners living along the Mediterranean found that this tomato loved the intense summer heat and sunshine.  The gardeners loved the fantastic flavor that this tomato brought to their dinner plates.

The Costoluto is also a strikingly beautiful tomato.  It’s fruit exhibits deep fluting along the shoulders.  When used as a slicing tomato, each slice will exhibit a beautiful scalloped edge.  I can’t be sure, but perhaps Thomas Jefferson grew the Costoluto Genovese for its beauty as much as its flavor.  I can only imagine how striking they must have been while growing in his beloved garden at Monticello.

Costoluto Genovese tomatoes are delicious eaten fresh as a slicing tomato.  This tomato also performs well when skinned and used in slow simmered sauces.  The flesh is meaty with an abundance of juice and tart tomato flavor.

At 1840 Farm, we love the Costoluto Genovese for its striking beauty and old-fashioned tomato flavor.  Every summer, we celebrate heirloom tomato season with the Costoluto Genovese.  Somehow, I think that Thomas Jefferson would have wanted it that way.

The Costoluto Genovese Heirloom Tomato is one of the six varieties included in our Tomato Lover’s Garden Heirloom Seed Collection available in The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.  The 2014 Heirloom Seed Collection is a collaboration between 1840 Farm and Fresh Eggs Daily.  Together, we have curated our favorite heirloom varieties into collections that are ideally suited for growing together.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.

1840 Farm

We invite you to join The 1840 Farm Community on Facebook and Fresh Eggs Daily on Facebook to share updates from your garden and keep up to date on what we’re harvesting from our heirloom gardens. We’ll also be sharing regular garden updates along with fresh, seasonal recipes in our 1840 Farm Community Newsletter and The Fresh Eggs Daily Newsletter.  In the meantime, you can view photos from the gardens at 1840 Farm by visiting our Garden Photo Tour.  More photos will be added as we progress through the 2014 growing season.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2014/03/costoluto-genovese-heirloom-tomato/

Black Cherry Heirloom Tomato

We love cherry tomatoes here at 1840 Farm.  It just wouldn’t be summer, or tomato season as we like to call it, without enjoying the experience of strolling through the raised bed garden and plucking a warm cherry tomato directly from the vine before popping it into your mouth.  Every year, we plant several varieties of heirloom cherry tomatoes and every year we declare the Black Cherry to be our favorite.

We plant dozens of Black Cherry Heirloom Tomato plants in the 1840 Farm gardens each year.  At the height of the harvest, we pick pounds of these beautiful little orbs every day.  We eat an abundance of them fresh and oven roast others for fresh pasta dishes.  We also put them up for the long New England winter that lies ahead.

We have found that these cherry tomatoes are ideally suited for long-term storage in the freezer.  Washed Black Cherry tomatoes are allowed to air dry before freezing them in a single layer on a baking tray overnight.  Once they are frozen solid, we transfer them to freezer bags and store them for use during the long winter season.

This method of preservation is simple and effective.  We enjoy fresh tomato sauces with the intense flavor of these cherry tomatoes all winter long.  With each delicious bite, we are reminded that the next tomato season is one day closer.  During our long New England winter, that reminder is a very welcome sight!

The Black Cherry Heirloom Tomato is one of the six varieties included in our Tomato Lover’s Garden Heirloom Seed Collection available in The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.  The 2014 Heirloom Seed Collection is a collaboration between 1840 Farm and Fresh Eggs Daily.  Together, we have curated our favorite heirloom varieties into collections that are ideally suited for growing together.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.

1840 Farm

We invite you to join The 1840 Farm Community on Facebook and Fresh Eggs Daily on Facebook to share updates from your garden and keep up to date on what we’re harvesting from our heirloom gardens. We’ll also be sharing regular garden updates along with fresh, seasonal recipes in our 1840 Farm Community Newsletter and The Fresh Eggs Daily Newsletter.  In the meantime, you can view photos from the gardens at 1840 Farm by visiting our Garden Photo Tour.  More photos will be added as we progress through the 2014 growing season.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2014/03/black-cherry-heirloom-tomato-2/

Heirloom Tomato Profile: Blondkopfchen Cherry

The Blondkopfchen Heirloom Cherry Tomato originated in Germany.  In German, the word “blondkopfchen” translates to “little blonde girl”.  My daughter was a little blond girl when we first began growing this tomato here at 1840 Farm.  In fact, she was the reason that I first ordered these heirloom seeds and planted them in our heirloom tomato garden.

The incredible taste and production of this heirloom was the reason we kept planting them each year.  Every year, our Blondkopfchen plants are the most prolific in the garden.  A single branch holds dozens of tiny orbs waiting to ripen in the sun.  I am always amazed at just how many tomatoes these plants can produce.

I’m also taken by the unique color of these ripe tomatoes.  They are golden yellow with a tinge of lime green undertones when they are fully ripe.  They are beautiful when used in fresh tomato dishes or sauces, bringing a lovely contrast to the other red colored tomatoes in the dish.

The Blondkopfchen tomato has a sweet, earthy flavor with a touch of citrus.  It’s a perfectly balanced blend of sweet and brightness.  It is a disease resistant variety that consistently produces tomatoes without cracked skins.  It also tolerates our cooler nights here in New England, making it perfectly suited to growing in our garden.  One taste of this fantastic variety and you’ll understand why it is a favorite here at 1840 Farm.


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/heirloom-tomato-profile-blondkopfchen-cherry/

Oven Roasted Heirloom Tomato Spaghetti

This recipe hails from RIalto restaurant in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  I happened upon it by way of The Tomato Festival Cookbook.  For an heirloom tomato lover like me, this cookbook is filled with delicious possibilities.  It includes everything imaginable from cold salads to chocolate cakes that incorporate green tomatoes that simply won’t have enough time to ripen on the vine.

While we enjoy many recipes from or inspired by this cookbook, Chef Jody Adams’ recipe for roasted spaghetti is our absolute favorite.  The dish has a wonderfully rich flavor that we look forward to all year long.  The tomatoes take on a sweet earthiness after their time roasting in the oven which pairs perfectly with the arugula, onion, and basil.  This dish is also beautiful, a real showstopper.

I love to tinker with recipes, adding a little of this or taking away a little of that.  I am especially prone to doing so with pasta recipes, making alterations that tailor the finished dish to my family’s taste.  This dish is so perfect that I have made very few changes.  I didn’t need to.  It’s perfectly delicious just the way it is written and sure to impress and delight everyone gathered around your table at dinnertime.

Oven Roasted Heirloom Tomato Spaghetti
Adapted from Spaghetti with Slow Roasted Tomatoes, Basil, and Parmesan Cheese
in The Tomato Festival Cookbook
Serves 4 as a main course

I have made very few changes to the original recipe.  I find that our homegrown heirloom tomatoes don’t need the sugar called for in the original recipe, but you can certainly add it to your tomatoes if you feel that they could use a little hint of sweetness.  I have also found that I can roast the tomatoes at a higher temperature than called for, reducing the cooking time by more than half with the same results.  After a long day of working on the farm, I opt for getting dinner on the table in an hour instead of the three that the original recipe promises.

2 ounces olive oil
1 large onion, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
16 – 20 basil leaves, torn or roughly chopped
1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
2 pounds ripe cherry tomatoes, rinsed and dried
2 ounces olive oil
2 teaspoons Sugar (optional)
sea salt
1 pound spaghetti
2 cups (3.5 ounces) arugula
Parmesan cheese

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.  Heat two ounces (1/4 cup) of olive oil in a small saucepan over medium heat.  Add the onion and cook, stirring often, for five minutes.  Add the garlic and cook for one minute or until fragrant.  Remove from heat and add the basil leaves and red pepper flakes.

Add the cherry tomatoes to an oven safe casserole dish that can hold them in a single layer.  If you are using the sugar, add two teaspoons and toss the tomatoes to coat.  Using a large spoon, transfer the onion olive oil mixture to the dish, placing on top of the tomatoes.  Sprinkle generously with salt.  Gently add the remaining 2 ounces (1/4 cup) olive oil to the sides and transfer the pan to the warm oven.  Roast until the tomatoes have softened and the skins are slightly charred, approximately 45 – 60 minutes.

Near the end of the roasting time, bring a large pot of water to a boil.  Add a generous teaspoon of salt to the water and return to a rapid boil.  Add the spaghetti to the pot and cook until al dente according to the package instructions.

Remove the tomatoes from the oven.  Add the cooked pasta and arugula to the tomatoes and toss to fully combine and coat the spaghetti with the tomato infused olive oil.  Serve immediately garnished with Parmesan cheese.


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/oven-roasted-heirloom-tomato-spaghetti/

Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta Pasta

When it comes to simple summer dinners, this recipe is as good as it gets.  In the time it takes for the water to come to a boil, I can have the entire recipe prepped and ready to cook.  By the time the pasta is perfectly cooked, the sauce is ready and dinner is served.

The inspiration for this pasta dish came from another summer favorite:  Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta with Basil.  We love to celebrate our beloved heirloom tomato season with fresh bruschetta on a warm summer afternoon.  So, why not prepare the rustic bruschetta topping and serve it with pasta instead of the traditional crusty loaf of bread?

The results are equally delicious.  It’s nice to have more than one way to celebrate the long-awaited arrival of heirloom tomato season.  It’s also nice to be able to serve a delicious, fresh dinner at our family table in less than 30 minutes from start to finish!

Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta Pasta
Serves 4 as a main course

1 pound heirloom tomatoes, cut into chunks
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 ounce sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil
1 Tablespoon oil from sun-dried tomatoes
1 Tablespoon  extra virgin olive oil
4 ounces mozzarella, cut into cubes
2 ounces smoked mozzarella, cut into cubes
12 ounces penne pasta
1 handful basil leaves, torn
salt and pepper to taste
Balsamic Vinegar Glaze

Bring a large pot of water to a roiling boil.  Add 1 Tablespoon of salt to the water and return to boil.  Add pasta and cook until al dente.

Meanwhile, combine the oil from the jar of sun-dried tomatoes with the olive oil and minced garlic in a large skillet.  Warm gently over low heat until the garlic is fragrant.  Roughly chop or julienne the sun-dried tomatoes before adding them to the warm oil.  Add the fresh tomatoes to the skillet and warm over low heat.

Add the cooked pasta to the skillet and toss to coat.  If the pan is dry, add water from the pasta pot to moisten.  Remove from the heat and add the basil and mozzarella.  Gently stir the mixture.  Taste for seasoning and add more salt or pepper if needed. Serve warm garnished with balsamic vinegar glaze.

 


This recipe was included with our Heirloom Tomato Collection in The 1840 Farm Heirloom Seed Collection.  All of the varieties in our collection are accompanied by plant profiles, planting instructions, and an 1840 Farm recipe so that you can enjoy my family’s favorite preparation with your family. 

The original illustrations for our collection were created by Jennifer Sartell of Iron Oak Farm.  They are available for purchase in the Iron Oak Farm Shop on Etsy.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/heirloom-tomato-bruschetta-pasta/

Oven Roasted Heirloom Tomato Ricotta Tart

I originally posted this recipe back in the very early days of writing this blog.  It seems fitting that this would be one of the longest lived recipes on the blog as it has been a family favorite since before we made 1840 Farm our home.  Each summer, we look forward to this rustic tart topped with our homegrown heirloom tomatoes.

The combination of flavors in this dish is perfectly balanced.  The acidity and earthiness of the tomatoes is the star, but the creamy ricotta and bright basil accent it deliciously.  It’s no wonder that this dish is a perennial family favorite.




Oven Roasted Heirloom Tomato Ricotta Tart
serves 4 – 6 as a main course

This recipe was inspired by a recipe published in Martha Stewart’s FOOD.  I use homemade bread crumbs from our Farmhouse Country Loaf for the crust.  Prepared bread crumbs or panko are also delicious. 

180 grams (2 cups) breadcrumbs
2 ounces (4 Tablespoons) olive oil
16 ounces ricotta cheese
2 ounces mozzarella cheese, cubed or shredded
1 ounce Parmesan cheese, grated
1 large egg
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh basil
1 pound heirloom tomatoes
olive oil for brushing
salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.  Prepare a 9 inch springform pan by wrapping the bottom in aluminum foil.  Set aside.   j

Slice bread into thick slices and place in the oven to dry.  When dry and cool, use a food processor to chop the toasted bread into fresh breadcrumbs.  With the motor running, add the olive oil and process until evenly moist.  Press mixture evenly in prepared pan, covering the bottom of the pan.

Rinse out the bowl and blade from the food processor.  Add ricotta cheese, mozzarella and Parmesan cheese, and egg to the food processor and process until completely smooth.  Add basil and pulse until basil is evenly distributed throughout the ricotta mixture.

Carefully add the ricotta mixture to the springform pan., spreading to cover. Slice heirloom tomatoes and place on top of the ricotta, overlapping where needed to fully cover the top.  Brush the top of the tart with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Place springform pan on a baking sheet and transfer to the preheated oven.  Bake for 40 minutes or until the tomatoes are beginning to dry and the ricotta mixture has become firm and golden.

Remove from the oven and allow to cool for ten minutes.  Carefully run a thin metal spatula or paring knife around the outside edge of the tart to loosen it from the pan.  Unmold the tart, cut into slices and serve warm.


This recipe was included with our Heirloom Tomato Collection in The 1840 Farm Heirloom Seed Collection.  All of the varieties in our collection are accompanied by plant profiles, planting instructions, and an 1840 Farm recipe so that you can enjoy my family’s favorite preparation with your family. 

The original illustrations for our collection were created by Jennifer Sartell of Iron Oak Farm.  They are available for purchase in the Iron Oak Farm Shop on Etsy.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!



 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/oven-roasted-heirloom-tomato-ricotta-tart/

Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta with Basil

In the early days of writing this blog, I shared a recipe for traditional tomato bruschetta.  It’s a family favorite during heirloom tomato season here at 1840 Farm.  On days that we come back to the kitchen with pounds of freshly picked tomatoes, this is what’s for dinner.

When the day is long and I’m tired from a full day’s work on the farm, I make a simpler, more rustic version of bruschetta.  I don’t slice the bread and toast it in the oven.  Instead, I place the whole loaf in a 400 degree oven for about 10 minutes to warm it slightly and freshen the crust.

As the bread is warming, I prepare a lovely warm bruschetta topping.  By the time the bread is warm, the topping is ready and we can start enjoying that delicious combination of earthy heirloom tomatoes, bright basil, and a great loaf of bread.

1 loaf of crusty French or Italian bread
2 cloves garlic, minced
8 ounces fresh heirloom tomatoes
1 ounce sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil
1 Tablespoon oil from sun-dried tomatoes
1 Tablespoon  extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, roughly chopped
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
1 ounce ricotta salata or Paremsan cheese
Balsamic Vinegar Glaze

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Prepare the tomatoes by chopping roughly or slicing cherry tomatoes into thirds.  Place in a medium serving bowl and set aside.

Place the loaf of bread in the warm oven and set the timer for 10 minutes. As the bread warms, prepare the topping by combining the oil from the jar of sun-dried tomatoes with the olive oil and minced garlic.  Warm gently over low heat until the garlic is fragrant.  Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.

Roughly chop or julienne the sun-dried tomatoes before adding them to the fresh heirloom tomatoes.  Add the basil, salt, and black pepper to the tomatoes before pouring the warm oil mixture over the top.  Gently stir the mixture.  Taste for seasoning and add more salt or pepper if needed.  Add the crumbled ricotta salata or shaved Parmesan cheese and stir to combine.  Drizzle with balsamic glaze if desired.

Slice the warm bread and serve with the bruschetta topping, spooning the topping over the bread and eating while it is still warm.  Enjoy!

 

 


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/07/heirloom-tomato-bruschetta-with-basil/

Smoky Tomato Jam

I started this blog almost three years ago.  During that time, I have shared countless recipes here and on other blogs.  Some of them are simple, others complex.  All of them are family favorites, tried and true dishes that never fail.  For the life of me, I can’t figure out why I haven’t shared this delightful recipe earlier.

Smoky Tomato Jam is truly a family favorite.  We honestly haven’t bought a bottle of ketchup since the day I made the first batch.  It’s really that good.  The flavor is earthy and full with so much more body than ketchup could ever deliver.

Coming from me, that’s a real compliment.  From the time I was a young child, I looked for reasons to add ketchup to my plate.  I couldn’t help it.  It was my childlike way to add a bit of tomato flavor to nearly every meal I ate.

I am happy to say that my love of tomatoes has endured and that my taste for them has improved. My tomato love now revolves around a perfectly ripe heirloom tomato.  In fact, you’ll find me in the garden each summer tending to well over 100 heirloom tomato plants.  In spite of all the tomatoes we grow, eat, can, and store, I still never get my fill of that pure tomato flavor.

So, when I saw an incredible looking recipe for a savory tomato jam, I was intrigued.  When I saw that it was written by a blogger who I enjoy and whose recipes are outstanding, I was in.  I went straight to the kitchen and made a batch.

It was amazing.  You know how much I love to tinker with a recipe, so I did.  I adjusted the spices, changed them slightly, and kept tinkering until I got it just to my family’s liking.  I have been making it the same way ever since.

We use this jam in a variety of ways here at 1840 Farm.  Of course, we use it instead of ketchup on burgers, hot dogs, and the like.  We also always feature it with our afternoon cheese course.  It is delicious paired with thinly sliced Piave or on a warm chunk of crusty bread with our homemade goat’s milk quark.  One taste of this divine concoction, and you’ll be dreaming of ways to use it in your kitchen.

So, with a hearty thank you to Jennifer Perillo, one of the first bloggers I followed, I give you the recipe for my family’s favorite Smoky Tomato Jam.  While I’m glad that you’re here at 1840 Farm collecting new recipes, I can’t help but encourage you to leave and browse Jennifer’s blog at In Jennie’s Kitchen to collect a few more.  You won’t be sorry, but I hope that you’ll be back here soon for more of my family’s favorite recipes!

Smoky Tomato Jam
adapted from Jennifer Perillo’s Sweet & Savory Tomato Jam

We prefer this jam to be chunky, but I have pureed it in the past to make a smooth puree that more closely resembles ketchup.  The spices can be changed and adjusted to suit your palate.  While I often use heirloom tomatoes during the height of our fresh tomato season, this recipe is equally delicious using canned diced tomatoes.  Once the tomatoes have been reduced and spiced, it becomes very difficult to discern if they are fresh from the garden or fresh from the pantry.

1 Tablespoon olive oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 ounces tomato paste
28 ounces chopped or diced tomatoes with juice
1 teaspoon chili powder
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon sea salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon paprika
1/3 cup (60 grams) unpacked brown sugar
1/3 cup apple cider vinegar

In a medium saucepan, saute minced garlic in olive oil over medium heat until fragrant, approximately one minute.  Add tomato paste and stir to blend with the oil and garlic.  Add the remaining ingredients and stir to combine.  Bring to a simmer before reducing the heat to low.  Continue to simmer uncovered for 45-60 minutes, stirring occasionally until the desired thickness is reached.

Enjoy as you would ketchup or as a delicious accompaniment to a cheese course.


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/05/smoky-tomato-jam/

Black Cherry Heirloom Tomatoes

We love cherry tomatoes here at 1840 Farm.  It just wouldn’t be summer, or tomato season as we like to call it, without enjoying the experience of strolling through the raised bed garden and plucking a warm cherry tomato directly from the vine before popping it into your mouth.  Every year, we plant several varieties of heirloom cherry tomatoes and every year we declare the Black Cherry to be our favorite.

We plant dozens of Black Cherry Heirloom Tomato plants in the 1840 Farm gardens each year.  At the height of the harvest, we pick pounds of these beautiful little orbs every day.  We eat an abundance of them fresh and oven roast others for fresh pasta dishes.  We also put them up for the long New England winter that lies ahead.

We have found that these cherry tomatoes are ideally suited for long term storage in the freezer.  Washed Black Cherry tomatoes are allowed to air dry before freezing them in a single layer on a baking tray overnight.  Once they are frozen solid, we transfer them to freezer bags and store them for use during the long winter season.

This method of preservation is simple and effective.  We enjoy fresh tomato sauces with the intense flavor of these cherry tomatoes all winter long.  With each delicious bite, we are reminded that the next tomato season is one day closer.  During our long New England winter, that reminder is a very welcome sight!

The Black Cherry is a member of The 1840 Farm Heirloom Seed Collection as part of our The Tomato Lovers Garden Heirloom Seed Collection available in The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.

1840 Farm

1840 Farm offers four other heirloom seed collections for purchase. The 1840 Farm Favorites Garden includes six of our favorite varieties to plant in the gardens here at 1840 Farm. The Easy Keepers Garden includes four varieties that are perfect for the beginning gardener and can be sown directly into a small garden plot or containers. The Pollinators Garden features six flowering plants that will help to attract beneficial pollinators to your garden.  Our Three Sisters Garden includes four packets of seed that allow you to enjoy delicious produce and an American history lesson as you put into practice one of the oldest forms of companion planting.

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Fresh Eggs Daily has assembled an amazing collection of heirloom seeds to offer this year. These collections will to help ensure the good health of the chickens and ducks in your care. With their collections, you can freshen up your coop’s nest boxes, boost your flock’s respiratory health, and grow fresh supplemental treats for all life stages of chickens and ducks.

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Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/04/black-cherry-heirloom-tomato/

Heirloom Tomato Profile: Purple Calabash

Purple Calabash Heirloom Tomatoes have been in the 1840 Farm vegetable gardens since our first summer living here in 2006.  Every year, we look forward to that first slice of Purple Calabash still warm from the sunshine.  If I had to choose just one tomato to grow, this variety would be in the running.

The Purple Calabash has a rich flavor and striking appearance.  The ripened fruits are slightly flattened and beautifully ruffled with a burgundy to deep purple color.  The vines are prolific producers of medium fruits around 3″ wide.

The taste of the Purple Calabash is often compared to red wines such as Cabernet.  The taste is rich and full of old-fashioned tomato flavor with just the right blend of sweetness and acidity.  The flesh is smooth and meaty with evenly distributed seeds.  We love to enjoy this tomato on freshly grilled panini with mozzarella and basil.  The flavor of the Purple Calabash really sings when it is used in a slowly simmered tomato sauce.

One bite of a perfectly ripe Purple Calabash Heirloom Tomato and you would understand why we love this variety so much.  Every year, I expect to find a new variety that I will enjoy just as much. It’s been seven years and I still haven’t found a tomato that can compete in terms of appearance, yield, or more importantly, taste.  Next year, there will again be Purple Calabash tomato seedlings growing in the heirloom garden at 1840 Farm.


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/09/heirloom-tomato-profile-purple-calabash/

Nearly Wordless Wednesday – August 1, 2012

I had intended to share a photo of the chicks in their garden coop today.  It seemed fitting given that they turn three months old this week.  That is, until I spotted this…

Once I saw the first nearly ripe heirloom tomato, all bets were off.  All I could think about was tasting this Peacevine Cherry. Every year, the Peacevine seems to be the first of our heirloom tomato varieties to ripen.  It’s a beautiful sign of the delicious things to come.

Sorry chicks.  You’ll have to wait your turn.  Maybe I’ll share a photo of you next week.  That is, unless the first slicing tomato is ready for its closeup.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/08/nearly-wordless-wednesday-august-1-2012/

Lily Season

There’s a season for everything here at 1840 Farm.  Soon, it will be my favorite season of all:  tomato season.  I’ll walk out to the garden every morning to survey the ripe fruit and return to the farmhouse with pounds of delicious heirloom tomatoes to share with my family.  Just thinking about it makes my mouth water.

I am happy to report that there are tomatoes on the vine out in the heirloom garden.  Unfortunately, there are weeks of waiting ahead before they will be ready to enjoy.  Until then, we’re harvesting lettuce by the pound, along with turnips, peas, and raspberries.

No, it’s not quite tomato season yet, but right now I’m enjoying lily season.  Every morning, I seem to be greeted by a new, glorious bloom in the perennial beds.  The blooms are strikingly beautiful and come in a paintbox full of colors.

The lilies are such a welcome sight in the perennial gardens here at 1840 Farm.  Alas, the blooms do not last very long, so I try to capture them with my camera when they are in bloom.  During lily season, I wade carefully through the blooming perennials to capture each color of lily.  While looking at them through my camera lens, I am always amazed at their beauty.

I hope that you enjoy them as much as I do.  Lily season is in midstream here and should continue for a few more weeks.  I’ll be capturing each variety as they come into bloom and sharing them here and on Facebook.  Then I’ll be counting the days until my beloved heirloom tomato season arrives and I can share photos of my favorite heirloom varieties.

This post was shared on:

Katie’s French Language Cafe

 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/07/lily-season/

Roasted Heirloom Tomato Tart

Heirloom Tomatoes at 1840 FarmThere are certain foods that scream summer to me.  At the very top of the list is my beloved heirloom tomato.  I long ago confessed my deep-rooted love of tomatoes, especially the heirloom variety.  During the summer, heirloom tomatoes take center stage in the 1840 Farm kitchen.  Like a well-loved house guest, we eagerly anticipate their annual arrival and mourn their loss once we have eaten the last morsel.

We built a new hoophouse this spring in order to extend and expand our heirloom tomato harvest.  So far, it has been an astounding success.  We have harvested over 100 pounds of heirloom tomatoes this year with more than 90% of them coming from within the walls of the hoophouse.

While the nighttime temperatures have started to dip closer to frost than I would like to admit, the temperature in the hoophouse is warm and the tomato plants living inside appear to be in midseason form.  In fact, the temperature inside the hoophouse hit the century mark yesterday.  Here’s hoping that we’ll be harvesting ripe tomatoes for many weeks to come.

You might wonder what a family of six could possibly do with over 100 pounds of heirloom tomatoes.  I’ll let you in on our secret:  we eat every last bite.  We share the bounty with other tomato loving friends and preserve sauce and savory tomato jam for enjoying over the long winter in New England.

Mostly, we eat tomatoes.  Then we eat more tomatoes.  Then we invent ways to eat a few more tomatoes.  It’s not an easy job, but someone has to do it.

While we invent new recipes each summer, there are a few family favorites.  One of them is roasted heirloom tomato tart with ricotta and basil.  When asked what’s for dinner, answering with this recipe always makes for a happy family looking forward to sitting at the dinner table.

Gathering with my family to sit around the farmhouse table at the end of the day and share a meal is much dearer to me than heirloom tomatoes.  Finding a way to combine the two is a bonus.  The fact that we have put months of hard work into bringing those tomatoes to the table makes it seem a little sweeter.  Long live summer at 1840 Farm.

Roasted Heirloom Tomato Tart
serves 4 – 6 as a main course

This recipe was inspired by the Tomato-Ricotta Tart in Martha Stewart Living’s FOOD.  Over the years, we’ve made a few changes and this is the version we prefer.  I use scraps from the bottom of the pita chip bag for the crust, but good quality bread crumbs or panko would also be delicious.  If you don’t have a food scale handy for weighing the pita chips, use an appropriate amount to yield a generous two cups of crumbs.

                    

180 grams pita chips or breadcrumbs
2 ounces (4 Tablespoons) olive oil
12 ounces ricotta cheese
1 ounce grated parmesan cheese
2 large eggs
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh basil
1 pound heirloom tomatoes
olive oil
sea salt
pepper

Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.  Prepare a 9 inch springform pan by wrapping the bottom in aluminum foil.  Set aside.

Place pita chips in the bowl of a food processor.  Process until chips have been transformed into fine crumbs.  Add olive oil and process until the mixture is evenly moist.  Empty crumb mixture into the prepared springform pan and press evenly to cover the bottom of the pan.

Rinse out the bowl and blade from the food processor.  Add ricotta cheese, eggs, and parmesan to the food processor and process until completely smooth.  Add basil and pulse until basil is evenly distributed throughout the ricotta mixture.

Carefully add the ricotta mixture to the springform pan.  Using a spatula, smooth the mixture over the crumb base to completely cover the pan.  Take care not to disturb the crust mixture any more than necessary.

Slice heirloom tomatoes and place on top of the ricotta, overlapping where needed to fully cover the top.  Brush the top of the tart with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Place springform pan on a baking sheet and place in the preheated oven.  Bake for 40 minutes or until the tomatoes are beginning to dry and the ricotta mixture has become firm and golden.

Remove from the oven and allow to cool ten minutes.  Carefully run a thin metal spatula or paring knife around the outside edge of the tart to loosen it from the pan.  Unmold the tart, cut into slices and serve warm.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2011/09/roasted-heirloom-tomato-tart/

Nearly Wordless Wednesday

In case anyone is wondering what I’ve been up to lately, I’ve been canning tomatoes!

Three day's of the heirloom tomato harvest at 1840 Farm - September 4-6, 2011

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2011/09/nearly-wordless-wednesday-2/

Nearly Wordless Wednesday – August 10, 2011

Heirloom tomato, how do I love thee?  Let me count the ways starting with the first ripe Purple Calabash of 2011.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2011/08/nearly-wordless-wednesday-august-10-2011/

Why I Garden

Two words:  heirloom tomatoes.  I will freely admit to being giddy this morning.  Why?  I have spotted the first ripening heirloom tomatoes in our greenhouse.  I know that it will only be a few days and there will be Peacevine Cherry tomatoes to enjoy fresh from the vine.  That first taste will be the moment I take a deep breath and remember just why I work so hard in the garden each year.

Why do you garden?

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2011/07/why-i-garden/

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