Tag Archive: recipe

Baked Pizza Dip

 Baked Pizza Dip at 1840 FarmBaked Pizza Dip at 1840 FarmWho doesn’t love pizza? It’s difficult to top the combination of gooey cheese, savory tomato sauce, and your favorite toppings. Pizza is always a hit here whether it is of the homemade, local pizzeria, or takeout variety. I knew that a bubbly, gooey baked pizza dip would be something that we would all love.

After a little experimenting with cheeses, sauces, and toppings, we settled on our favorites and started assembling our dip. It was simple to put together and ready to bake in about twenty minutes. After another twenty minutes in the oven, it was bubbling and ready to serve. It smelled delicious and filled the entire farmhouse with its intoxicating aroma.

I served the dip with slices of warm Italian bread and garlic bread. It was delicious on both. The combination of the smooth cheese and tangy tomato sauce were perfect. Everyone came back for more. It was so good that we were talking about making it again before we had even finished it.

This recipe would be perfect for a comforting snack on a snowy afternoon, a get together with friends, or an easy party appetizer. On Super Bowl weekend, it may come in handy!

Baked Pizza Dip
This dip deconstructs pizza, allowing you to bake up a bubbly, gooey dish of the cheese and sauce normally found on your favorite pizza. It is delicious served with sliced bread, garlic bread, or your favorite thick crackers or pita chips. Because the bread or crackers are served on the side, this would be the perfect pizza treat for families that avoid gluten when served with your favorite gluten free bread. It can also be tossed with freshly cooked pasta for a delicious, comforting meal.
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For the sauce
  1. 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  2. 2 cloves garlic, minced
  3. 2 Tablespoons tomato paste
  4. 14 ounces tomato sauce/puree
For the dip
  1. 8 ounces cream cheese, softened
  2. 8 ounces ricotta cheese
  3. 8 ounces mozzarella cheese, shredded
  4. 1 ounce Parmesan cheese, grated
  5. assorted pizza toppings if desired
  6. dried oregano
  7. Italian bread, garlic bread, or your favorite crackers for serving
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. In a small pan over medium heat, sauté the garlic for one minute. Add the tomato paste and stir to cook briefly, approximately one to two minutes. Add the tomato sauce and stir to combine. Reduce the heat to low and simmer to thicken slightly, stirring occasionally. Taste for seasoning, adding salt and pepper as needed.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine the softened cream cheese and ricotta. Stir until the mixture is smooth. Transfer to an oven safe casserole dish, spreading to evenly cover the bottom. Sprinkle half of the mozzarella cheese over the ricotta mixture.
  4. Top the cheesy layer with the tomato sauce, distributing it evenly. Sprinkle the remaining mozzarella over the tomato sauce. Top with the Parmesan cheese and your favorite pizza toppings. Sprinkle a bit of dried oregano over the top.
  5. Transfer the dish to the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes. The mixture will become bubbly and slightly browned on top. Your bread can be warmed for a few minutes in the same warm oven.
  6. Remove the bubbly dip from the oven. Allow to cool slightly as you slice and plate the bread. The dip can be served family style from the casserole dish or in small bowls or ramekins for dipping. Enjoy!
Notes
  1. I like to make my own tomato sauce for this recipe. You can use one to one and a half cups of your favorite tomato sauce with equally delicious results.
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Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2016/02/baked-pizza-dip/

Jelly Doughnut Muffins

Jelly Doughnut Muffins at 1840 FarmThe other day, my son mentioned that he would love to have jelly donuts for breakfast over the weekend. It’s a seemingly simple request with a delicious treat for the whole family. Unfortunately, his food request isn’t quite that simple here at our house.

With food allergies to contend with, certain foods are incredibly difficult for us to purchase. We’re incredibly fortunate to have discovered what I think are the most delicious donuts on earth at Holy Donut. We’re even luckier that they don’t use any peanuts or other nuts in their bakery, so we can safely enjoy their amazing donuts here at home. Of course, it isn’t always possible for us to take a two and a half hour road trip to pick up donuts. If Portland, Maine was a little closer to home, their donuts might be on our breakfast table every weekend.

I have made homemade donuts before, but this time I decided to move in a different direction. I remembered having an old recipe from Fine Cooking Magazine for a doughnut muffin from Downtown Bakery & Creamery in California. I had been holding on to that recipe for several years. These muffins are often talked about in food magazines and television shows. I’ve seen them chosen as the “favorite” bite of many famous foodies. Now it was my turn to try them.

JellyDonutMuffinWMEverything I read mentioned that these muffins had the taste and texture of a great cinnamon sugar cake doughnut without the need for me to roll out the dough, cut out the doughnuts, and fry them in oil before serving. Better yet, the batter could be prepared and stored in the refrigerator for several days, allowing me to bake fresh muffins for days to come.

I reasoned that the muffins could only be made better by adding a spoonful of homemade jelly inside before serving. My son would enjoy the flavor of jelly donuts and we’d get to try out a recipe for a muffin that is so beloved by those who line up to buy them at Downtown Bakery.

The recipe was simple to prepare. I baked them each day for four days. The fresh muffins on the fourth day were every bit as delicious as those prepared on day one. Each morning, my family couldn’t stop commenting about how amazing they were. Without jelly, they taste like the world’s best coffeecake in muffin form. With a bit of our homemade jelly, jam, or marmalade spooned into the center, they deliver jelly doughnut flavor with every single bite.

My son loved these muffins as much as I hoped he would. This recipe is definitely the path to a sweeter weekend for the whole family and an easy treat for me to add to our farmhouse table at breakfast time. Because the batter can be made ahead of time, I can prepare the batter on Friday and then bake them each weekend morning for our breakfast.  While they bake in the oven, I can accomplish my morning farm chores and start enjoying my first cup of coffee. As they cool on the counter, I’ll struggle to decide what sort of filling I want to enjoy. No matter what I chose, they’re bound to be delicious!

Jelly Doughnut Muffins
Yields 16
I love to bake these muffins in my extra-large muffin pan. The large, fluffy muffins are beautiful and perfect for filling with our favorite homemade jam, jelly, or marmalade. I bake enough for the crowd and serve them with a full array of our homemade preserves, allowing each person to choose their favorite filling. If you prefer, you could bake your muffins in a standard sized muffin pan. Simply reduce the baking time, checking the muffins after fifteen minutes to ensure that they don’t overbake.
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For the muffins
  1. 8 ounces (2 sticks) butter, softened and cubed
  2. 1 ¾ cup granulated sugar
  3. 4 ounces (1/2 cup) oil (any neutral tasting oil will do)
  4. 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  5. 4 large eggs
  6. 6 cups All-purpose flour
  7. 5 teaspoons baking powder
  8. ½ teaspoon baking soda
  9. 1 ¾ teaspoon salt
  10. 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  11. 1/3 cup buttermilk
  12. 1 2/3 cup whole milk
For the topping
  1. melted butter for brushing on warm muffins
  2. ½ cup granulated sugar
  3. 1-2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line the cavities of a muffin tin with paper liners. You can also use silicone cupcake liners if you prefer. Set aside as you prepare the batter.
  2. Using a mixer, beat the butter and sugar in a large bowl until creamy. Add the oil and vanilla extract, mixing briefly to incorporate. Add the eggs and beat until the mixture is smooth.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon. Use a whisk to blend and aerate the dry ingredients.
  4. In a small bowl or measuring cup, combine the buttermilk and whole milk.
  5. Add approximately one third of the dry ingredients to the butter mixture. Slowly mix to incorporate. Add half of the milk/buttermilk and mix gently. Repeat until all of the dry and wet ingredients have been fully incorporated. Take care not to overmix. Stop the mixer as soon as the batter is smooth. Overmixing will encourage the gluten in the flour to develop, creating a chewy muffin rather than the flaky, light muffin we’re trying to create.
  6. Scoop around ½ to 2/3 cup batter into each lined muffin tin. I use an ice cream scoop, adding two scoops of batter to each liner. The batter should be almost even with the top of the liner.
  7. Transfer the muffin pan to the preheated oven. Bake for 30-40 minutes, until the muffins are firm to the touch and a toothpick inserted into the middle of the muffin comes out with small crumbs attached.
  8. Remove the baked muffins from the oven. Allow them to cool for a few minutes as you prepare the cinnamon sugar topping.
  9. In a small bowl, melt a few tablespoons of butter. In a second small bowl, combine the granulated sugar and cinnamon, adjusting the amount of cinnamon based on your preferences.
  10. Brush or dip each warm muffin in the melted butter. Dip the butter topped muffins in the cinnamon sugar or spoon the cinnamon sugar on top, allowing the cinnamon sugar to adhere to the top of each muffin. Set the muffins aside to cool slightly.
  11. At this point, the muffins can be allowed to cool to room temperature and stored in an airtight container before serving. The batter can also be held for several days in the refrigerator, baking fresh muffins for breakfast each morning.
  12. Right before serving, use a small paring knife or apple corer to remove a small portion of the center of the muffin. Spoon a teaspoon of your favorite jam, jelly, or marmalade into the cavity before serving your Jelly Doughnut Muffins. Enjoy!
Adapted from Fine Cooking Magazine
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Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2016/02/jelly-doughnut-muffins/

French Toast Bread Pudding

French Toast Bread Pudding at 1840 FarmFrench Toast Bread Pudding with a cup of hot coffee is one of my favorite ways to begin our Sunday mornings here at 1840 Farm. It’s tough to beat a dish that tastes this delicious and can be put together the night before. Humble day old bread never had it so good.

This recipe combines the flavor of French Toast with the texture and ease of bread pudding. Every cube of bread soaks up the eggy custard, puffing up as it bakes, creating both soft and crunchy textures. This dish has everything: beauty, flavor, texture, and the assumption that you must have spent hours in the kitchen creating such a delicious, comforting dish. Knowing that you didn’t just might make it taste even better.

This recipe is delicious and great for a crowd. Because all of the prep work is done the night before, I can spend my time enjoying the family and friends gathered for breakfast or brunch the next morning. I love knowing that something so delicious is baking in the oven while I’m enjoying the coffee and company around our farmhouse table. As the intoxicating aroma fills the farmhouse, we all become eager to dig in and taste that first delicious bite.

While the ingredients in this recipe are simple, the results are amazing. Each bite of bread is filled with the rich flavor of fresh eggs and earthiness of vanilla. As it bakes in the oven, the caramel beneath the bread cubes becomes thick and luscious. This really is a recipe where the finished dish is definitely greater than the sum of its parts. Believe me, you’ll serve this once to your family and friends and they will keep coming back for more!

French Toast Bread Pudding
Serves 8
This recipe combines the flavor of French Toast with the texture and ease of bread pudding. Every cube of bread soaks up the eggy custard, puffing up as it bakes, creating both soft and crunchy textures. This dish has everything: beauty, flavor, texture, and the assumption that you must have spent hours in the kitchen creating such a delicious, comforting dish. Knowing that you didn’t just might make it taste even better.
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Cook Time
35 min
Cook Time
35 min
Ingredients
  1. 5 large eggs
  2. 6 ounces half and half
  3. 6 ounces whole milk
  4. 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  5. 1 Tablespoon Grand Marnier
  6. 1 large French baguette
  7. 4 ounces (1 stick) butter, cubed
  8. 1 cup (192 grams) brown sugar
  9. 1 Tablespoon honey
  10. 1/8 teaspoon sea salt
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, half and half, milk, vanilla extract, and Grand Marnier. Using a serrated knife, cut the bread into 1 inch cubes. Add the bread cubes to the egg mixture and stir gently with a spatula to coat each cube. Allow the bread to rest in the egg mixture as the caramel is prepared.
  2. In a small pan over medium heat, melt the butter. Add the brown sugar, honey, and salt. Stir over medium heat until the mixture is smooth. Remove the caramel from heat.
  3. Transfer the caramel to a large oven safe casserole dish (I use my lasagna pan). Spread the caramel to fully cover the bottom of the pan. Using a spatula, gently transfer the soaked bread cubes to the pan, distributing them to evenly fill the pan and cover the caramel. Cover the pan and refrigerate overnight.
  4. In the morning, preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Remove the pan from the refrigerator and place on a large baking sheet. When the oven has come up to temperature, place the pan in the oven and bake uncovered for 30-35 minutes. When the bread is perfectly baked, it will be puffed and golden on the edges.
  5. Remove the pan from the oven, pour the coffee, and serve. I like to use a large spatula to remove a serving from the baking pan. By turning the spatula upside down to plate the bread pudding, the gooey caramel will be on top, making its way through the bread cubes to the plate below. It’s a feast for the eyes and the taste buds. Enjoy!
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To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2016/01/french-toast-bread-pudding/

Curried Chickpeas

Curried Chickpeas at 1840 Farm

We’re only weeks away from the Big Game, the biggest football game of the calendar year. Football fans will be planning gatherings with family and friends to watch the game and enjoy fun food while doing so.

We’ll do the same, making our favorite snack foods to nibble on during the pregame until the last seconds tick off on the game clock. While we haven’t decided on the final menu, I know that we’ll probably have grilled burgers and sausages, perhaps a pot of chili, and these delicious curried chickpeas.

When entertaining, I love to depend on recipes that can be prepared ahead, and those that pair well with a variety of other recipes. These chickpeas are just that sort of recipe. They develop a deep flavor when allowed to rest in the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight before serving. They make a great, flavorful side dish for grilled meats, and offer a great vegetarian option for those who prefer not to eat meat.

I prepare a large batch of these chickpeas the day before the Big Game. If we have enough of them leftover, I have been known to serve them over steamed rice for dinner the next night or I often puree them with a bit of olive oil, tahini, and lemon juice to make a delicious curried hummus. No matter how I reimagine them, they’re always delicious.

One of our favorite brands, Mezzetta, is celebrating the Big Game by holding their Homegating MVP (Most Valuable Pepper) Sweepstakes.  You can enter to win an amazing collection of prizes from Mezzetta.  You can enter to win:

Grand Prize (one winner will be selected)
55” 4K LED TV
The Mezzetta Homegating Party Pack (Mezzetta branded football, blanket, four pint glasses, cooler, party tray, cocktail napkins, and a jar each of Mezzetta Whole Golden Greek Peperoncini, Deli-Sliced Tamed Jalapeños, Deli-Sliced Mild Pepper Rings, Sliced Golden Greek Peperoncini, Roasted Bell Peppers and Deli-Sliced Roasted Bell Pepper Strips.

Runner Up Prizes (ten winners will be selected)
The Mezzetta Homegating Party Pack (Mezzetta branded football, blanket, four pint glasses, cooler, party tray, cocktail napkins, and a jar each of Mezzetta Whole Golden Greek Peperoncini, Deli-Sliced Tamed Jalapeños, Deli-Sliced Mild Pepper Rings, Sliced Golden Greek Peperoncini, Roasted Bell Peppers and Deli-Sliced Roasted Bell Pepper Strips.

After you’ve entered to win, you can find a great group of recipes perfect for game day.  I can’t wait to try the Italian nachos they shared in this video! Be sure to enter before January 26, 2016.  Good luck to all who enter!

Curried Chickpeas
I prepare a large batch of these chickpeas each time I make them. If we have enough of them leftover, I have been known to serve them over steamed rice for dinner the next night or I often puree them with a bit of olive oil, tahini, and lemon juice to make a delicious curried hummus. No matter how I reimagine them, they’re always delicious.
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Ingredients
  1. 8 cups chickpeas, cooked and drained
  2. 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  3. 1 large onion, diced
  4. 6 cloves garlic, minced
  5. ¼ cup Mezzetta Roasted Red Bell Peppers, drained and chopped
  6. 2 Tablespoons sundried tomatoes packed in oil, drained and chopped
  7. 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
  8. 1 Tablespoon chili paste
  9. 8 ounces coconut milk
  10. 8 ounces bone broth or stock
  11. 2 Tablespoons curry powder
  12. 2 teaspoons turmeric powder
  13. 2 Tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  14. salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. In a large pot over medium heat, sauté the onion in olive oil until translucent. Add the garlic, peppers, and sundried tomatoes, cooking briefly to warm, approximately one or two minutes. Add the tomato paste, chili paste, coconut milk, and broth, stirring to combine.
  2. Bring the mixture to a simmer before reducing the heat to low. Add the curry, turmeric, lemon juice, and drained chickpeas. Stir to combine and simmer for 20 minutes. Taste for seasoning, adjusting as needed.
  3. Remove from heat and serve as a side dish or over steaming bowls of rice as a main course with warm pita bread.
Notes
  1. I prefer to cook dried chickpeas for this recipe, using two pounds of them which leaves me with a few extra to use in other dishes. You could substitute canned chickpeas if you prefer, using 4-5 cans which have been rinsed and drained.
  2. This recipe is highly adaptable. If you like your curry spicy, add a bit more chili paste or cayenne pepper to taste. You can vary the ratio of coconut milk to bone broth if you prefer a creamier curry or one with more of a broth base. Feel free to experiment, adjust, and add your favorite flavors to this dish. Make it your own and enjoy every flavorful bite!
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We’re thrilled to have the opportunity to share one of our favorite brands with our readers.  1840 Farm abides by word of mouth marketing standards. We believe in honesty of relationship, opinion and identity.  Compensation received from sponsors will not influence the topics or posts made on this blog.  Sponsored posts will be clearly labeled as such. Product reviews will include our honest opinions about the product(s) reviewed.  Products that do not meet our standards of daily use on our farm will not be reviewed. Samples of the products that I review are sent to me at no expense in order to allow me to use the product and evaluate its performance.  The framework of our review process does not guarantee a positive review in exchange for the product provided.  Our product reviews contain both facts about the product and my personal opinion of its performance while it was used at 1840 Farm.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2016/01/curried-chickpeas/

Farmhouse Style Cast Iron Skillet Meatloaf

Farmhouse Style Cast Iron Skillet Meatloaf

In my book, there’s nothing more comforting on a cold winter’s night than meatloaf and mashed potatoes. If that meatloaf can be prepared in a cast iron skillet, all the better. Comfort food from a cast iron skillet is just the sort of farmhouse style comfort food my family clamors for on a wintry New England day.

A cast iron skillet is perfectly suited for making meatloaf. It holds the heat well, ensuring that the meatloaf bakes evenly. The same skillet can be used to sauté the vegetables and herbs that will be incorporated into the meatloaf before being used to bake the meatloaf in the oven. Reducing the number of dishes I need to use and clean while prepping dinner is always a welcome development in my kitchen.

Once you’ve made this cast iron skillet meatloaf, you’ll be left wondering why you ever baked meatloaf in a loaf pan. My loaf pan may be feeling a bit lonely, because I’ve never made meatloaf in that pan since discovering that I could bake it so perfectly in my cast iron skillet!

Farmhouse Style Cast Iron Skillet Meatloaf
Serves 6
I like to incorporate Italian sausage into the ground beef or buffalo that I use in this recipe. The combination results in a wonderfully seasoned, delicious meatloaf. If you like more spice, you could certainly use spicy Italian sausage with equally delicious results. I often double this recipe and use my large 12 inch cast iron skillet to bake a larger meatloaf. Then I am able to look forward to serving leftovers the next night. Like most savory dishes, this meatloaf is even more delicious the second night!
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Cook Time
1 hr
Cook Time
1 hr
Ingredients
  1. 1 Tablespoon lard
  2. 1 Large onion, finely diced
  3. 3 garlic cloves, minced
  4. 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  5. 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  6. 8 ounces Italian sausage, removed from the casing
  7. 16 ounces ground grass fed beef or buffalo
  8. 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
  9. 1/3 cup old fashioned oats
  10. 2 large eggs
  11. 2 ounces mozzarella cheese, shredded
  12. ¼ cup ketchup
  13. 1 Tablespoon soy sauce
  14. 1 Tablespoon brown sugar
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Warm an 8-9 inch cast iron skillet over medium heat. Add the lard, swirling the pan to coat the bottom surface of the skillet. Add the onions and cook until translucent. Add the garlic, thyme, and rosemary, stirring for one minute to prevent the garlic from burning. Remove the pan from the heat.
  3. In a large bowl, combine the ground beef or buffalo with the Italian sausage that has been removed from its casing. Add the tomato paste, sautéed onion mixture, oats, and eggs. Mix to fully combine the ingredients.
  4. Transfer about half of the mixture to the cast iron skillet, pressing to evenly cover the bottom of the skillet. Sprinkle the shredded mozzarella cheese over the top before covering with the remaining ground meat mixture. Press the meat mixture to the edges of the skillet. The mixture should reach the edges of the skillet and be an even thickness to ensure that it will bake evenly.
  5. In a small bowl, combine the ketchup, soy sauce, and brown sugar. Spread this mixture over the top of the ground meat. Transfer the skillet to the warm oven and bake for 50 to 60 minutes. When the meatloaf is finished, it will begin to pull away from the edges of the pan and register at 160 degrees on a meat thermometer.
  6. Remove the meatloaf from the oven and allow to cool for five minutes before slicing into wedges and serving. We love to enjoy this meatloaf with Colcannon Style Mashed Potatoes. The combination of meatloaf, potatoes, and cabbage is a favorite at our farmhouse table.
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To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2016/01/farmhouse-style-cast-iron-skillet-meatloaf/

Leftover Thanksgiving Turkey and Potato Hash

Leftover Thanksgiving Turkey Hash in a Cast Iron Skillet at 1840 FarmIn my opinion, Thanksgiving leftovers don’t get the respect they deserve.  A feast on Thursday can produce enough leftovers for an entire weekend of delicious meals and sandwiches.  Any leftover turkey can be transformed into something completely new and delicious with very little effort.

I originally started making a Cast Iron Skillet Pork and Potato Hash with leftovers from our Beer and Brown Sugar Braised Pork.  It was always a hit at our family table and became just as popular as the pork we enjoy the first night for dinner.  Soon, we were making braised pork with this hash in mind and eagerly anticipating the second night’s delicious dinner.

It stood to reason that leftover Thanksgiving turkey would be just as delicious when transformed into hash.  It was.  Year after year, this hash is just as popular as the pork version we enjoy.  It’s also a dish that celebrates those Thanksgiving leftovers while creating something completely different to serve at our family table.

I hope that your family will enjoy it just as much as mine does!

Leftover Thanksgiving Turkey and Potato Hash
Serves 4-6 as a main course

This recipe makes use of one of my favorite pans: a cast iron skillet. I like to use my Lodge 12 inch cast iron skillet when preparing this hash. If your skillet is smaller, you can reduce the proportions to fit your pan. I love to use homemade bone broth for this recipe when I have it on hand, but an equal amount of good quality stock can be used.  If you have any roasted carrots, parsnips, or other root vegetables leftover from your Thanksgiving feast, add them in.  The results will be completely new and delicious!

1 Tablespoon butter
1 large onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 ½ pounds potatoes, washed and cut into ½ inch cubes
¼ teaspoon dried thyme
12 ounces homemade bone broth or good quality stock
8 ounces shredded turkey
2 ounces heavy cream
salt and pepper to taste
2 ounces smoked cheddar, grated

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Position an oven rack in the middle of the oven.

Heat a large cast iron skillet over medium high heat. Add the butter to the hot pan and swirl to coat the bottom surface. Add the onion and cook until almost translucent, about five minutes. Add the garlic and cook one minute before adding the potatoes to the pan, stirring to combine.

Add the thyme and bone broth to the pan. Bring the liquid to a simmer. Cover the pan and reduce the heat to low. Cook for 10 minutes undisturbed.

Remove the cover and stir the mixture. The potatoes should have begun to soften and absorbed some of the liquid. Add the turkey and heavy cream to the pan and stir to combine. Taste for seasoning, adding salt and pepper to taste. Press the mixture firmly into the pan and top with the grated cheddar. Transfer the skillet to the warm oven.

Cook the hash for ten minutes. Check the potatoes for doneness before turning on the broiler. Broil for two minutes to brown the top surface of the hash. Remove from the oven and serve hot.  We like to serve this hash with a side of Classic Sauerkraut.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/leftover-thanksgiving-turkey-hash/

Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie – Nut Free

ChocolateBourbonPecanPieCloseAs a child, every Thanksgiving and Christmas was celebrated with my paternal grandmother’s homemade pies. She always had a collection of them fresh out of the oven, ready to mark the end of another family meal. I could always count on finding some sort of seasonal pie along with pecan and her famous schwatzenberry.

ChocolateBourbonPecanPieTopThose warm memories have stayed with me over the years. They’ve also ensured that we mark Thanksgiving and Christmas celebrations with homemade pies at our farmhouse table.   Because of the food allergies we cook and bake around, we haven’t always been able to enjoy the flavor of a pecan pie at our family table. I missed the earthy, nutty flavor of pecan pie, but there was simply no safe way to enjoy the flavor without worry of cross contamination and allergic reactions.

It was almost five years ago that I first discovered that I could create completely nut free baked goods in our farmhouse kitchen that had the delicious nutty flavor we were missing due to nut allergies.  Wheat Nuts® became a pantry staple, allowing me to bring back a few flavors from my past without introducing nuts into our home.

Sadly, Wheat Nuts® products disappeared from the market in 2013, leaving us without the ingredient and snack we loved so much. Earlier this year, I received the wonderful news that these nut free and tasty snacks were being produced and were available to purchase. It was a moment worth celebrating in our nut free kitchen. When we discovered that there was an entirely new collection of nut free snacks and ingredients being offered, I couldn’t wait to place my order and start creating new recipes to enjoy during the holiday season and beyond.

You can order the following varieties which are all manufactured in a 100% nut free facility:Wheat Nuts and Nadanut

Wheat Nuts®
Nadanut® Salted Pecans
Nadanut® Unsalted Pecans
Nadanut® Salted Cashews
Nadanut® small chopped pecan pieces
Nadanut® medium chopped pecan pieces
Nadanut® small chopped walnut pieces
Nadanut® small chopped pistachio pieces

For the first time in far too many years, I will be serving this nut free pecan pie at our Thanksgiving table.  I hope that you will join us in serving this delicious pie to your friends and family and that they will enjoy it as much as we do.

Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie

In our nut free home, we use Nadanut® snacks to add the flavor of pecans without any worry of allergens paying a visit to our family table. If you aren’t baking with nut allergies in mind, you can easily substitute 2 cups of pecans in this recipe with delicious results. If you find yourself struggling when making homemade pie crust, read my simple pie crust tips and make flaky, delicious pie crust like a pro.

1 ½ cups (180 grams) All-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon salt
4 ounces (1 stick) butter, grated
4-6 Tablespoons ice water

2 Tablespoons butter
¾ cup bittersweet chocolate chips or chunks
2 Tablespoons heavy cream
2 large eggs
1 cup (120 grams) dark brown sugar
¼ cup maple syrup
2 Tablespoons bourbon
1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup Nadanut® small chopped pecan pieces
½ cup Nadanut® Unsalted Pecans
½ cup Nadanut® medium chopped pecan pieces

To make the crust, place flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor.  Pulse the dry ingredients to combine.  Add the grated butter and pulse until the butter has begun to incorporate into the flour and resembles small grains of rice.

With the motor running, add ice water one Tablespoon at a time until the dough forms a ball.  Take care not to over process the dough.  Over processing will help to develop the gluten in the flour and lead to a crust that is chewy and tough.  Less is more when it comes to working pie crust and will result in a flaky, light crust.

Transfer the pie crust dough to a pie plate.  Using your fingers, press the dough into shape gently until it is a uniform thickness and completely covers the bottom and sides of the pie plate. Work around the plate, rolling any excess crust underneath to form a thick ridge along the edge of the pie.  Using your fingers, flute the edge of the crust or use a fork to crimp along the edge.  Continue until the entire perimeter has been sealed. Transfer the pie plate to the refrigerator to chill while the oven warms and the filling is prepared.

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit.  Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil to catch any pie filling that may bubble over during baking.  Set aside.

In a small pan set over low heat, warm the butter and chocolate until melted and smooth, stirring often to prevent scorching. Remove the pan from the heat and add the heavy cream, stirring until completely smooth.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the eggs, sugar, and maple syrup. Whisk until smooth. Add the bourbon, vanilla, and salt. Stir to combine before adding the Nadanut® pieces (or pecans). Add the melted chocolate mixture to the bowl and stir until the filling is well combined.

Remove the pie plate from the refrigerator. Transfer the filling to the pie plate, spreading evenly. Place the pie on top of the prepared baking sheet and transfer it to the preheated oven.  Bake for 55 minutes or until the top of the filling has developed a crisp golden brown shell and the pie crust is evenly brown.  Rotating the pie midway through the baking time will help to ensure that your pie is evenly baked.

Remove the pie from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool.  Serve warm or at room temperature.  Top with vanilla ice cream or freshly whipped cream if desired.


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes and crafts all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes and DIY projects right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

ThanksgivingGallery1114

 


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/chocolate-bourbon-pecan-pie-nut-free/

An 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Celebration

Fall at 1840 Farm

For me, Thanksgiving is a holiday marked by time spent with family gathered around the table and the delicious tastes of our favorite holiday dishes. I have fond childhood memories of Thanksgiving meals prepared by my paternal grandmother and a team of aunts and uncles. The food was delicious and comforting and the conversation was lively. There was laughter and joy at that table and the meal always ended with my grandmother’s homemade pies.

It’s really no wonder that Thanksgiving traditions have remained so strong over the years. A day that combines family, friends, and comforting homemade food is a holiday to cherish. In many ways, our annual celebration is much like the original harvest celebration that took place 400 years ago, a celebration of all that we are grateful for in our daily lives and the marking of the end of another year’s homegrown harvest of fresh food from our gardens.

The Thanksgiving meal has evolved significantly over the years, but its importance has not diminished.  The first feast would have probably featured wild fowl instead of our modern-day turkey. History tells us that there would not have been cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, or pumpkin pie at that first celebration.  When they sat down to enjoy their meal, the settler’s sugar stores had been depleted, the potato had not yet made its way to North America, and using butter and flour to make a pie crust was a luxury far beyond their wildest imagination.ThanksgivingSquashDecor

Instead, their celebration would have revolved around food that was seasonal,  rustic, simple, and local.  Most likely, it would have featured venison and seafood that had been hunted and caught by the men of the group along with corn, beans, and squash from the land that they had tended during the growing season.  The celebration took place over a series of days instead of at a single meal.

By the mid-1800s, sage dressing and mashed potatoes had begun to take their place on a traditional Thanksgiving table.  In 1863, Abraham Lincoln made Thanksgiving a national holiday.  Since then, we have been marking the day and celebrating with our favorite dishes.

Three generations of my family will gather around our farmhouse table for our Thanksgiving meal in a house that was built at a time before Thanksgiving was declared a national holiday.  I will inevitably turn my thoughts towards all that I am thankful for.  The list is too long to mention, but family, friends, and our life here on the farm are all at the top of my list.

I am also thankful for you, Dear Reader.  You have inspired me to continue telling my family’s story and have returned the favor by sharing yours.  I have enjoyed learning about your farms and families as much as I have enjoyed sharing news from mine.  So, on this holiday that celebrates family, friends, and food enjoyed together, I wish you a day overflowing with all three.  I hope that you have a holiday filled to the brim with laughter, memories in the making, and those nearest and dearest to you.

 

 


Here’s a peek at a few of the recipes and crafts that will be found on our Thanksgiving table.  I’ll be adding new recipes and DIY projects right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

You can click on any of the photos to visit the original post so that you can add them to your celebration.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/1840farm_thanksgiving/

Nut Free Pecanless Pie Bars

It was almost five years ago that I first discovered that I could create completely nut free baked goods in our farmhouse kitchen that had the delicious nutty flavor we were missing due to nut allergies.  Our home has been nut free for nearly a decade since we discovered that our son has food allergies.  Suddenly, the peanuts and tree nuts that we had turned to as nutritious snacks and baking ingredients were off limits.

I learned to enjoy brownies and cookies that didn’t contain nuts.  I even experimented until I found a peanut butter replacement that could be used to create a tasty substitute for peanut butter cookies.  But there were a few recipes that I just couldn’t seem to create nut free versions of.  Pecan pie, peanut brittle, and trail mix were eventually written off as something that we just couldn’t make in our kitchen.

Then I discovered a product called Wheat Nuts®.  I doubted that they would have the nutty flavor we missed so much, but I couldn’t help but give them a hopeful taste.  I was so happy to be wrong after taking the first bite and enjoying the flavor of nuts all over again.

I came to learn that Wheat Nuts® had been developed in the late 1970s, well before nut allergies became such a common issue for so many families.  I was so grateful to be able to keep our pantry stocked with them and set to work on recipes for the elusive pecan pie and peanut brittle.

As I was working to perfect my pecan pie filling in time for Thanksgiving that year, I decided to try my hand at creating a recipe for a nut free pecan pie bar.  The recipe became an immediate hit with our family and was a staple in our farmhouse kitchen during the colder months of the year when fresh berries for pies and crumbles weren’t being harvested from our gardens.

Sadly, Wheat Nuts® were pulled from the market in 2013, leaving us to meter out our remaining supply until it was gone.  We used the last of our stash to make a pan of these bars and then returned to the reality of not being able to enjoy the flavor of nuts in our nut free home.

Since that time, I have received countless messages and comments from nut free families just like ours who were desperate to find Wheat Nuts® again.  We shared in the disappointment of not being able to enjoy their delicious flavor in our homes without worry of cross contamination or allergic reactions.Wheat Nuts and Nadanut

On a morning a few months ago, I received a comment that changed my disappointment into sheer excitement.  Imagine my surprise when I read a message sharing the happy news that the product we loved was back!  Even better, there were several new products to try that were also nut free.

You can order the following varieties which are all manufactured in a 100% nut free facility:

Wheat Nuts®
Nadanut® Salted Pecans
Nadanut® Unsalted Pecans
Nadanut® Salted Cashews
Nadanut® small chopped pecan pieces
Nadanut® medium chopped pecan pieces
Nadanut® small chopped walnut pieces
Nadanut® small chopped pistachio pieces

For the first time in far too many years, we will be enjoying the flavor of pecan pie at our Thanksgiving table.  We couldn’t bear to wait until Thanksgiving dinner to enjoy the flavor that we have missed so much, so a celebratory batch of these completely nut free pecanless pie bars is definitely in order!

Nut Free Pecanless Pie Bars
makes 24 bars

Shortbread Crust
240 grams (2 cups) All-purpose flour
72 grams (6 Tablespoons) brown sugar
6 ounces butter, cubed

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  Line a 13 x 9 inch pan with parchment paper.

Place all ingredients in food processor.  Process using on/off turns until the mixture has just formed small clumps.  Do not over process.  Sprinkle mixture over the bottom of prepared pan.  Lightly press the mixture evenly into the bottom of the pan.  Bake for 20 minutes until light golden brown.  Prepare filling as the crust is baking.

Nut Free Pecanless Pie Filling
168 grams (2 cups) Nadanut® medium chopped pecan pieces
144 grams (3/4 cup) brown sugar
4 ounces butter
63 grams (3 Tablespoons) honey
1 ounce (2 Tablespoons) half and half

Melt butter in heavy saucepan over medium heat.  Stir in brown sugar, honey, and half and half.  Bring to a gentle simmer and cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly.  Remove from heat and stir in chopped Wheat Nuts.

When the shortbread crust is finished baking, remove it from the oven and  immediately pour warm filling over the top.  If necessary, spread filling evenly over the crust.  Return pan to the oven and bake for 20 minutes.  Remove from the oven and cool completely.

Run a sharp knife or spatula around the edges of the pan to loosen the cooled bars.  Use the edges of the parchment paper to lift cooled bars from the pan to a cutting board.  Using serrated knife, cut into bars.  Serve warm or at room temperature.


I love to share my favorite products from our 1840 Farmhouse Kitchen.  Here are the tools and ingredients I used when creating this recipe.  I know that you will love using them as much as I do.


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes and crafts all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes and DIY projects right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

ThanksgivingGallery1111

 


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/nut-free-pecanless-pie-bars/

Condensed Milk Caramel

Condensed Milk Caramel at 1840 FarmThere are few things more delicious than a deeply flavored caramel. It’s versatile and can turn the simple into the sublime. Warmed and spooned over vanilla ice cream, used as a dip for fresh apple slices, or drizzled over desserts right before serving, it is always a welcome sight.

Caramel is simply sugar cooked until it melts, darkens, and turns brown in color. The heat breaks down the sucrose (white sugar) into glucose and fructose. As it cooks, the glucose and fructose react and create the complex flavor that we know as caramel. The simple, sweet sugar is transformed with heat and time into the buttery, slightly bitter caramel flavor. It’s a bit magical really to think that something so complex and delicious could be created with such simple ingredients.

There are two main types of caramel: wet and dry. The dry version is made by heating sugar until it liquefies. The wet version involves combining sugar with water and heating it until the mixture darkens and thickens. Wet caramel recipes are more forgiving but require more time while dry caramels are less forgiving and allow much less room for error.

Both types of caramel require a degree of timing, patience, and attention to detail. Cook the caramel too long until it reaches too high a temperature and the sugar solids will burn and scorch. At that point, there’s no saving the caramel. In fact, it becomes nearly impossible to even remove it from the pan.

If a caramel isn’t cooked long enough and doesn’t reach the right temperature, it will not develop that trademark caramel flavor and color. Instead, it will merely be a sweet syrup, a one note wonder in the flavor department.

The magical caramelization begins when the mixture reaches a temperature around 320 degrees Fahrenheit. A candy thermometer is essential to the task of correctly boiling a caramel to the right temperature. Care must be taken to prevent burns. A single drop of the hot liquid as it pops and boils on the stove can burn skin badly.Condensed Milk Caramel at 1840 Farm

While I love the flavor of caramel and have made both types successfully, I don’t always have the time and attention to properly tend to a batch of caramel on the stove. These mixtures are a bit temperamental and can go from underdone to scorched very quickly. Believe me, I’ve watched it happen right in front of me.

So, when I read that I could make caramel without needing to tend the bubbling pot, I couldn’t wait to give it a try. This method requires only one ingredient: sweetened condensed milk. No fancy tools are needed and I have found it to be absolutely foolproof. The results are delicious every single time.

Sweetened condensed milk is the perfect base for making a wet caramel. It is basically milk that has had more than half of its water content removed before being sweetened and packed in cans. It is thick, rich, and shelf stable. A can of condensed milk typically contains only two ingredients: milk and sugar.

This caramel is made by simply boiling the sweetened condensed milk for several hours in the can. As heat is applied, the sugar naturally caramelizes. Because the milk is boiled inside its can, there’s no need to worry about it becoming too thick or scorched as the moisture cannot evaporate. There’s no need to use a candy thermometer or to tend the pot constantly.

Thanks to this recipe, we always have thick, delicious caramel in our pantry.  We use it for making pies, tarts, ice cream sundaes, and for dipping those fresh New England apple slices.  I hope that you will give this delicious caramel recipe a try for yourself. The process is so simple and you’ll be able to produce a delicious caramel to share with your friends and family!

Condensed Milk Caramel

This recipe is so simple that it seems far too good to be true. Believe me, it is true and will produce a thick, delicious caramel with very little effort. Take care to use a deep pot and to ensure that water consistently covers the top of the cans or jars, adding more water if needed. If the water level drops below the top of the containers, they may burst. I like to use a canning rack to keep the containers from resting on the bottom of the pot. You can learn how to easily make your own canning rack to fit any pot in your kitchen.

Condensed Milk Caramel at 1840 FarmMost recipes for this type of caramel call for the condensed milk to be boiled in the can it is purchased in. With BPA in the news, I decided to experiment and found that the condensed milk could easily be poured into glass canning jars and boiled as if you were canning its contents. I find that jelly sized Mason jars work very well. I simply divide a can of condensed milk (14 ounces) between two half pint (8 ounce) canning jars. Add a canning lid and ring and process the jars as you would if you were canning. The resulting caramel will be every bit as delicious.

I like to boil several cans/jars at the same time so that I can keep our pantry stocked. Unopened jars of caramel keep in our pantry for several months. As they age, you may notice a few hardened toffee like bits of sugar in the caramel. Don’t worry, they’re perfectly safe to eat and absolutely delicious!

Sweetened condensed milk
Canning rack
Deep pot

If you plan to boil the caramel in the cans the condensed milk comes in, simply remove the paper labels from each can. Otherwise, open the cans and pour the condensed milk into canning jars before adding a canning lid and ring. Place the cans and/or jars in the boiling pot, using a canning rack if glass jars are used.

Add enough cold water to the pot to cover by at least an inch, more if the pot allows. Place the lid on the pot and place the pot over high heat. When the water has come to a boil, reduce the heat to a low simmer. Simmer for three hours, checking the water level every so often and adding more water if needed to ensure that the containers remain fully submerged in the water. If you use canning jars, you will notice the caramel taking on a deeper color as time goes on.

When the three hours have passed, turn off the heat and remove the lid from the pot. Allow the water to cool completely to room temperature. Remove the cans/jars from the pot and allow them to cool completely before labeling and storing in the pantry.


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!

 


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/10/condensed-milk-caramel/

Savory Husk Cherry and Rosemary Jam

Husk Cherries at 1840 FarmHusk Cherries (Physalis pruinosa) are related to the tomatillo and tomato.  They share the same scientific family with tomatoes and the same genus as the tomatillo.  The marble shaped fruits are sweet and earthy with a tropical note.  Their flavor defies easy explanation.  Each bite is equal parts sweet and citrusy.  Imagine a sweet, ripe cherry tomato married with the citrus flavor of pineapple and mango.  You really have to try one to understand how beautifully these seemingly unrelated flavors meld together.

The husk cherry isn’t just delicious.  It’s also simple to grow and hits its stride just as the rest of our garden is wrapping up for the season.  It sets beautiful lantern shaped husks on its low growing vines during the summer.  Inside those husks, the little fruits ripen until they are ready to harvest.  The husk provides a measure of protection from pests and I have found them to be vigorous even during years when pests are helping themselves to other plants in our garden.

When the fruit is ripe, the husk begins to change from its brilliant leaf green color to a straw, parchment color.  It takes on a dry texture and will fall to the ground when ready to harvest.  This habit of falling to the ground when ripe gives the husk cherry their other name, “ground cherry”.

The past few years, I have planted Aunt Molly’s Ground Cherry, a variety that has a Polish heritage.  This variety has produced a lovely harvest of beautiful gold fruits with an amazing flavor.  This variety has a high pectin content, making it perfect for sweet or savory jams.  I find that these little papery husks can be kept at room temperature for nearly a month before the fruit begins to suffer.

I remember the first time I tasted a husk cherry.  It was nearly a decade ago.  I was at one of our local farmer’s markets shopping for fresh produce.  One of the farmers had a small basket of husk cherries.  I asked if they were some sort of tomatillo given their papery husk.  The farmer was happy to tell me all about this interesting little fruit.  He even passed over a few for my small daughter and I to taste.  One bite and I was hooked.  The flavor was so unique, so completely original from anything I had ever tasted.  He went on to tell me a bit about them and I purchased several ears of corn and heirloom tomatoes from him before moving on.Photo Sep 13, 8 33 53 PM

I remembered those little husk cherries and looked for them at our local community seedling sales.  I never found them and worried that our painfully short growing season wouldn’t allow me the time needed to grow them from seed for our garden.  A few years ago, I finally decided to try.  I was overjoyed when I picked that first ripe fruit from our garden.  I was even more excited when we had enough of them to make something with them in our farmhouse kitchen.

Of course, then I had to decide what I should make with them.  I couldn’t seem to find a recipe that didn’t mask their distinct flavor.  I was looking to highlight their unique flavor, not cover it up.  So, I kept trying until this simple preparation was bubbling away on the stove.  It may be the simplest option I tried.  It was undoubtedly the most delicious.  This savory jam celebrates the best of the husk cherry’s flavor and offers a wonderful balance of sweetness and acidity accented by rosemary fresh from the garden.  It’s delicious served with a cheese course or as a spread on a gourmet grilled cheese sandwich.

I hope that you will find husk cherries at your local farmer’s market and that you’ll join me in planting them in your garden.  Trust me, one taste and you’ll be planting them along with me year after year.

 

Savory Husk Cherry and Rosemary JamHusk Cherry Jam at 1840 Farm
makes about 4 ounces of jam

6 ounces husk cherries, papery husks removed
2 Tablespoons (24 grams) brown sugar
1 Tablespoon apple cider vinegar
4″ sprig fresh rosemary, leaves removed and chopped finely
1 pinch sea salt

Place a medium saucepan over medium heat.  Add all of the ingredients and stir to combine. Bring the mixture to a simmer before reducing the heat to low.  Using the back of a large spoon or a potato masher, gently crushing the fruit to break the skins and release the juice.  Continue to simmer uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the mixture is slightly thickened.

Remove from the heat and allow to cool to room temperature.  This savory jam can be stored in a Mason jar in the refrigerator for several weeks.  Serve it chilled or at room temperature with a cheese and charcuterie course.


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!

 


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/09/savory-husk-cherry-and-rosemary-jam/

Re-pickling to Perfection

Repickling at 1840 FarmHave you ever re-pickled?  I’m happy to say that I have.  A few weeks ago, I found myself at the bottom of as amazing jar of McClure’s Sweet & Spicy Pickles.  As I stared at the remaining brine, I wondered:  could I add fresh vegetables to the brine and create a refrigerator pickle?

Each summer, I make several batches of refrigerator dill pickles using heirloom cucumbers from our garden.  I use the brine a few times, making delicious batches of fresh, crispy pickles.  By the time the brine has been used a few times, I need to start a new batch of brine.  The cucumbers release enough liquid as they sit in the brine to eventually dilute the brine to a point that it is not strong enough to be used.

Knowing that a cucumber dilutes the brine as it pickles, I decided to create a different type of pickle for my first re-pickling experiment.  I used fresh green and yellow beans and beautiful carrots from our local farmer’s market. I quick blanched the vegetables to preserve their color, adding them warm to the cold jar of brine.  I hoped that the warmth of the vegetables would speed up the pickling process and help each piece of vegetable to take on more of the brine’s flavor.

Within hours, I tasted the first carrot and was amazed at the flavor.  It tasted as though I had spent hours creating a delicious brine and preparing the vegetables.  Knowing that I had instead spent a few minutes made each bite taste even more delicious.

Here’s how I achieved re-pickling perfection.  First, I selected a brine that has an intense flavor.  I also chose vegetables with a lower moisture content than cucumbers, knowing that they would release less water into the brine and allow me to continue re-pickling through several batches. Since then, I have attempted to re-pickle using a more moderately flavored brine with cucumbers and found the results to be disappointing.  Select a strong brine and the low moisture vegetables for the most flavorful pickles.Pickled Beans and Carrots at 1840 Farm

To prepare the beans and carrots, bring a large pot of water to a roiling boil over high heat.  Once the water is boiling, add a generous Tablespoon or two of salt.  Wash the beans and snap to remove the ends.  Trim any beans that are too long to fit into the pickle jar.  Peel the carrots before cutting them into long spears.

Add the carrots to the boiling pot of salted water.  Once the water has come back to a boil, blanch the carrots very briefly, 1-2 minutes.  Remove the carrots from the boiling water while they are still crisp and shock them by placing them in the cold jar of pickle brine.  Repeat this process with the beans.

Shocking the blanched vegetables in the cold brine will stop the cooking process, set their bright color, and help the vegetables to develop a delicious flavor.  At this point, the jar of vegetables and brine can be stored in the refrigerator until ready to use.  These pickles must be refrigerated.  They are not intended for long-term pantry storage.

I can’t wait to try this re-pickling method with other fresh vegetables.  I have my sights set on a batch of dilled cauliflower florets.  I hope that you’ll give re-pickling a try especially if you’ve been hesitant to attempt making your own pickles!


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/08/re-pickling-to-perfection/

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