Tag Archive: Iron Oak Farm

Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta Pasta

When it comes to simple summer dinners, this recipe is as good as it gets.  In the time it takes for the water to come to a boil, I can have the entire recipe prepped and ready to cook.  By the time the pasta is perfectly cooked, the sauce is ready and dinner is served.

The inspiration for this pasta dish came from another summer favorite:  Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta with Basil.  We love to celebrate our beloved heirloom tomato season with fresh bruschetta on a warm summer afternoon.  So, why not prepare the rustic bruschetta topping and serve it with pasta instead of the traditional crusty loaf of bread?

The results are equally delicious.  It’s nice to have more than one way to celebrate the long-awaited arrival of heirloom tomato season.  It’s also nice to be able to serve a delicious, fresh dinner at our family table in less than 30 minutes from start to finish!

Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta Pasta
Serves 4 as a main course

1 pound heirloom tomatoes, cut into chunks
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 ounce sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil
1 Tablespoon oil from sun-dried tomatoes
1 Tablespoon  extra virgin olive oil
4 ounces mozzarella, cut into cubes
2 ounces smoked mozzarella, cut into cubes
12 ounces penne pasta
1 handful basil leaves, torn
salt and pepper to taste
Balsamic Vinegar Glaze

Bring a large pot of water to a roiling boil.  Add 1 Tablespoon of salt to the water and return to boil.  Add pasta and cook until al dente.

Meanwhile, combine the oil from the jar of sun-dried tomatoes with the olive oil and minced garlic in a large skillet.  Warm gently over low heat until the garlic is fragrant.  Roughly chop or julienne the sun-dried tomatoes before adding them to the warm oil.  Add the fresh tomatoes to the skillet and warm over low heat.

Add the cooked pasta to the skillet and toss to coat.  If the pan is dry, add water from the pasta pot to moisten.  Remove from the heat and add the basil and mozzarella.  Gently stir the mixture.  Taste for seasoning and add more salt or pepper if needed. Serve warm garnished with balsamic vinegar glaze.

 


This recipe was included with our Heirloom Tomato Collection in The 1840 Farm Heirloom Seed Collection.  All of the varieties in our collection are accompanied by plant profiles, planting instructions, and an 1840 Farm recipe so that you can enjoy my family’s favorite preparation with your family. 

The original illustrations for our collection were created by Jennifer Sartell of Iron Oak Farm.  They are available for purchase in the Iron Oak Farm Shop on Etsy.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/heirloom-tomato-bruschetta-pasta/

Slow Roasted Cherry Tomato Sauce

During the height of heirloom tomato season, we harvest several pounds of cherry tomatoes every day.  It’s intentional:  we plant two dozen cherry tomato plants every summer in our garden.  We have found that they store amazingly well in the freezer, allowing us to make this fresh sauce all winter long.  When the snow is flying outside, a pot of this sauce bubbling on the stove is a wonderful way to remind ourselves that summer will indeed come again.

At 1840 Farm, we enjoy this rich sauce served on fresh polenta made from cornmeal we grind ourselves.  It is also delicious tossed with spaghetti or served with pasta and meatballs. The flavor is rich and earthy with just the right amount of acidity and natural sweetness.

To freeze cherry tomatoes, simply wash them and allow them to dry fully on a clean kitchen towel.  Line a baking sheet or pan that fits into your freezer with freezer paper or parchment.  Place the tomatoes on the pan and place in the freezer.  Allow the tomatoes to freeze solid overnight before transferring to a freezer bag.  Don’t be concerned if the skins rupture as they freeze.  The tomatoes will still store incredibly well and produce a delicious sauce.

Slow Roasted Cherry Tomato Sauce

We love to use our favorite heirloom cherry tomato, the Black Cherry, in this recipe.  You can substitute your favorite cherry or grape tomato variety with equally delicious results.

1 Tablespoon butter
1 Tablespoon olive oil
1 large onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 ounce dry vermouth
2 ounces tomato paste
1 pound Black Cherry Heirloom Tomatoes or your favorite variety
1/2 cup vegetable stock or water
salt and pepper to taste

Place a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat.  Add butter and olive oil.  Once the butter is melted, add the onion and stir to coat.  Cook until the onion is translucent, approximately 5 minutes.  Add the garlic and cook for one minute.  Add the vermouth, scraping the bottom of the pan to release any caramelized pieces of onion or garlic.  Add the tomato paste and stir to fully combine.

Add the cherry tomatoes to the pan and stir to combine.  Allow the tomatoes to cook for 2-3 minutes or until they begin to soften and release their juices.  Using the back of a spoon or a potato masher, lightly crush the tomatoes.  Reduce the heat the low.  Allow the sauce to simmer for 10 minutes or until thick.  Taste for seasoning, adding salt and pepper as needed.   Add more broth if necessary to achieve the desired consistency.

Reduce the heat to low and allow the sauce to continue to simmer, adding liquid if necessary.  The longer the tomatoes are allowed to cook, the more intense their flavor will be.  Serve the sauce spooned over polenta, spaghetti, or tossed with your favorite pasta, topping with freshly grated Parmesan cheese if desired.

 


This recipe was included with our Heirloom Tomato Collection in The 1840 Farm Heirloom Seed Collection.  All of the varieties in our collection are accompanied by plant profiles, planting instructions, and an 1840 Farm recipe so that you can enjoy my family’s favorite preparation with your family. 

The original illustrations for our collection were created by Jennifer Sartell of Iron Oak Farm.  They are available for purchase in the Iron Oak Farm Shop on Etsy.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/slow-roasted-cherry-tomato-sauce/

Oven Roasted Heirloom Tomato Ricotta Tart

I originally posted this recipe back in the very early days of writing this blog.  It seems fitting that this would be one of the longest lived recipes on the blog as it has been a family favorite since before we made 1840 Farm our home.  Each summer, we look forward to this rustic tart topped with our homegrown heirloom tomatoes.

The combination of flavors in this dish is perfectly balanced.  The acidity and earthiness of the tomatoes is the star, but the creamy ricotta and bright basil accent it deliciously.  It’s no wonder that this dish is a perennial family favorite.




Oven Roasted Heirloom Tomato Ricotta Tart
serves 4 – 6 as a main course

This recipe was inspired by a recipe published in Martha Stewart’s FOOD.  I use homemade bread crumbs from our Farmhouse Country Loaf for the crust.  Prepared bread crumbs or panko are also delicious. 

180 grams (2 cups) breadcrumbs
2 ounces (4 Tablespoons) olive oil
16 ounces ricotta cheese
2 ounces mozzarella cheese, cubed or shredded
1 ounce Parmesan cheese, grated
1 large egg
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh basil
1 pound heirloom tomatoes
olive oil for brushing
salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.  Prepare a 9 inch springform pan by wrapping the bottom in aluminum foil.  Set aside.   j

Slice bread into thick slices and place in the oven to dry.  When dry and cool, use a food processor to chop the toasted bread into fresh breadcrumbs.  With the motor running, add the olive oil and process until evenly moist.  Press mixture evenly in prepared pan, covering the bottom of the pan.

Rinse out the bowl and blade from the food processor.  Add ricotta cheese, mozzarella and Parmesan cheese, and egg to the food processor and process until completely smooth.  Add basil and pulse until basil is evenly distributed throughout the ricotta mixture.

Carefully add the ricotta mixture to the springform pan., spreading to cover. Slice heirloom tomatoes and place on top of the ricotta, overlapping where needed to fully cover the top.  Brush the top of the tart with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Place springform pan on a baking sheet and transfer to the preheated oven.  Bake for 40 minutes or until the tomatoes are beginning to dry and the ricotta mixture has become firm and golden.

Remove from the oven and allow to cool for ten minutes.  Carefully run a thin metal spatula or paring knife around the outside edge of the tart to loosen it from the pan.  Unmold the tart, cut into slices and serve warm.


This recipe was included with our Heirloom Tomato Collection in The 1840 Farm Heirloom Seed Collection.  All of the varieties in our collection are accompanied by plant profiles, planting instructions, and an 1840 Farm recipe so that you can enjoy my family’s favorite preparation with your family. 

The original illustrations for our collection were created by Jennifer Sartell of Iron Oak Farm.  They are available for purchase in the Iron Oak Farm Shop on Etsy.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!



 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/oven-roasted-heirloom-tomato-ricotta-tart/

Growing Our Own Thanksgiving Celebration

It’s early June, but I’m already dreaming of Thanksgiving dinner.  I can almost picture the homegrown feast that will grace our family table.  The herbs for our favorite sage and artichoke heart dressing are already growing in the garden.  Sweet potato slips have been planted, seed potatoes are taking root, and heirloom corn, squash and beans will be sprouting in the coming days.

Now you can join in and learn more about the gardens here at 1840 Farm, the heirloom varieties we love, and the Thanksgiving feast that will follow.  I’ll be sharing updates and harvest notes throughout the growing season and hoping that you’ll share the news and notes from your backyard and garden here and with The 1840 Farm Community on Facebook.

Long before Thanksgiving dinner arrives, we’ll be enjoying berries, tomatoes, and a host of other heirlooms fresh from the garden.  I’ll be sharing our favorite recipes so that you can enjoy them on your family table.

You can learn more about our Thanksgiving garden and the history of the holiday itself by reading my How to Grow Your Own Thanksgiving Series on The Daily Meal.  The slideshow contains beautiful photographs from our friends at Iron Oak Farm and detailed planting and harvest information for herbs, sweet potatoes, potatoes, and pumpkins.

Now it’s time for me to get out in the garden and plant our Stowell’s Evergreen Heirloom Sweet Corn.  It’s the first step in our Three Sisters Garden and I can’t wait to watch as it grows in our gardens.  Our heirloom three sisters garden will provide Stowell’s Evergreen Heirloom Sweet Corn, Sunset Heirloom Runner Beans, and Long Island Cheese Heirloom Squash for our Thanksgiving menu.  I can almost taste it already!

Are you growing crops in your garden specifically for your Thanksgiving table?  I’d love to learn more about the varieties and recipes that you enjoy at your annual celebration.

From The Farm Blog Hop
 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/06/growing-our-own-thanksgiving-celebration/

Black Cherry Heirloom Tomatoes

We love cherry tomatoes here at 1840 Farm.  It just wouldn’t be summer, or tomato season as we like to call it, without enjoying the experience of strolling through the raised bed garden and plucking a warm cherry tomato directly from the vine before popping it into your mouth.  Every year, we plant several varieties of heirloom cherry tomatoes and every year we declare the Black Cherry to be our favorite.

We plant dozens of Black Cherry Heirloom Tomato plants in the 1840 Farm gardens each year.  At the height of the harvest, we pick pounds of these beautiful little orbs every day.  We eat an abundance of them fresh and oven roast others for fresh pasta dishes.  We also put them up for the long New England winter that lies ahead.

We have found that these cherry tomatoes are ideally suited for long term storage in the freezer.  Washed Black Cherry tomatoes are allowed to air dry before freezing them in a single layer on a baking tray overnight.  Once they are frozen solid, we transfer them to freezer bags and store them for use during the long winter season.

This method of preservation is simple and effective.  We enjoy fresh tomato sauces with the intense flavor of these cherry tomatoes all winter long.  With each delicious bite, we are reminded that the next tomato season is one day closer.  During our long New England winter, that reminder is a very welcome sight!

The Black Cherry is a member of The 1840 Farm Heirloom Seed Collection as part of our The Tomato Lovers Garden Heirloom Seed Collection available in The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.  The heirloom, non-GMO seeds in our collection are from family owned seed purveyor Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Company.

1840 Farm

1840 Farm offers four other heirloom seed collections for purchase. The 1840 Farm Favorites Garden includes six of our favorite varieties to plant in the gardens here at 1840 Farm. The Easy Keepers Garden includes four varieties that are perfect for the beginning gardener and can be sown directly into a small garden plot or containers. The Pollinators Garden features six flowering plants that will help to attract beneficial pollinators to your garden.  Our Three Sisters Garden includes four packets of seed that allow you to enjoy delicious produce and an American history lesson as you put into practice one of the oldest forms of companion planting.

 Loading InLinkz ...

Fresh Eggs Daily has assembled an amazing collection of heirloom seeds to offer this year. These collections will to help ensure the good health of the chickens and ducks in your care. With their collections, you can freshen up your coop’s nest boxes, boost your flock’s respiratory health, and grow fresh supplemental treats for all life stages of chickens and ducks.

 Loading InLinkz ...

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/04/black-cherry-heirloom-tomato/

Friends of 1840 Farm – Iron Oak Farm

This post is long overdue.  Truth be told, I have considered Iron Oak Farm to be a friend of 1840 Farm for years.  I first came to know Jennifer Sartell in the fall of 2010.  She was merely a name behind an Email address back then.  We had both been selected to be among a new batch of contributors to the Community Chickens blog.  More than two years have passed and I am happy to say that I have learned so much about her and from her during that time.

I have learned that we share much more in common than our first name.  We both love the daily life on our farms.  We both keep chickens, goats, and rabbits and love sharing the experience with our readers on our blogs.  We are also passionate about gardening and enjoy learning more about heirloom varieties.Jennifer and her husband Zach are also both talented artists.  The Iron Oak Farm Etsy shop is full of Zach’s fantastic hand forged steel items and Jennifer’s original photography, artwork, handmade goat’s milk soaps, and fiber produced by their goats and rabbits.

Our shared love of heirloom vegetables led me to ask Jennifer to join me in bringing The 1840 Farm Heirloom Seed Collection to life.  I was thrilled when she agreed to participate.  I was awestruck when I saw the amazing artwork she produced.  I am so proud to have such beautiful artwork to accompany the seeds in our collection.  I know that you will be just as impressed with her talent as I introduce you to each variety in the collection and each piece of art that she so lovingly created.

I follow Iron Oak Farm’s blog and Facebook page to make sure that I don’t miss out on their fantastic handmade products or the adorable animals that call their farm home.  From Oliver the dog to Ichabod and newborn Harriette in their goat herd, there seems to always be a photo in my newsfeed that makes my day.

I hope that you will take a moment to visit Iron Oak Farm, and follow their blog and page.  As you can see, you won’t want to miss the photos of all of the adorable goat kids that have been born at Iron Oak Farm over the last few weeks!

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/04/friends-of-1840-farm-iron-oak-farm/