Tag Archive: farming

From the Farm Blog Hop #36

From the Farm Blog Hop - http://thismindbeinyou.com/

Where has the week gone?  It seems like I blinked and Friday was here.  The good news?  If Friday is here, then it’s time for another fantastic From the Farm Blog Hop!

Each week the From the Farm Blog Hop co-hosts welcome a fellow blogger to come join in the fun and guest host along with us. This week’s guest host is Mindie from The (mis)Adventures of a “Born Again” Farmgirl! Welcome Mindie!

 photo mindiebio.jpgOn a 1/4 acre in a small town lives a slightly deranged woman (that’s me!) who never thought she would be a Farm Girl again. I tried so hard to “escape” my roots, but then I grew up, got married and had a family. My oldest country kid (I have two sons 7 and 1) asked for a pet chicken a few years ago, so I did what any good mom would and bought him one! That was the beginning of the end so to speak. We now have chickens, ducks, and rabbits (besides non “farm” animals which include such oddities as a baby snapping turtle and a baby red squirrel we are rehabbing.)

I bake using sourdough, I garden to produce healthy food for my family, but most of all, I have learned to embrace with a passion all those things that I once wanted to distance myself from. It is not the amount of land you live on, but what you do on that land that makes you a homesteader and I am proud to share this type of life with my family. We don’t always get it right, thus the name (mis)Adventures, but that is half the fun!

Each week, we also select a few favorite links from the previous week’s hop. Here are the features from last week’s From the Farm Blog Hop #35 party:

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Making Honeysuckle Jelly
by Stacked Stone Farm
 photo IMAG2467_zps695d54ca.jpg
Collecting Seed by Smart Food Storage

How to Clean a Coffee Maker Naturally and On the Cheap by Poor and Gluten Free
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Simple Granola by Heritage Schoolhouse

Congratulations to the bloggers who provided our favorite posts last week!  I can’t wait to see what fantastic recipes, DIY projects, and helpful tips will be linked up this week.

Each week, we’re hoping that you will share up to three of your favorite posts here on the From the Farm Blog Hop. Our hop may be “From the Farm”, but your post doesn’t have to be. If you’re a farmer at heart or a suburbanite with a backyard farm that consists of a container garden, your post will be perfectly at home here.

1. Link up to three of your best gardening or homesteading tips, farm-themed posts, recipes, homemaking and simple/frugal living tips, decorating ideas, DIY projects, craft ideas, thrifty makeovers or repurposed items, healthy and sustainable living tips.

2. Link back to my blog, or put the link party button anywhere on your blog or post to share the love.

3. Make sure to check out some of the other links before leaving. You’ll be sure to find a new recipe, great DIY project, or gardening tip to use this summer. I find something fantastic every week and I know that you will too!

From the Farm Blog Hop button - http://thismindbeinyou.com/
Photo provided by Chicken Scratch Poultry http://chickenscratchpoultry.com/

 

 

Note: Linking up to this party will automatically sign you up for an invite to next week’s party via email. To unsubscribe, please reply to any email you receive and you will be removed. Linking up also allows us permission to publish one of your photos on our blogs, Facebook, and/or Pinterest pages. If you are interested in guest hosting for our blog hop, please feel free to contact Kristi by email.

To make sure that you don’t miss out on any of the fun, come follow From the Farm on Facebook and on our new blog. We’ve got a new page, a fantastic group of contributors and followers, and neverending conversation for you to join in.  We’ll hope to see you there!

Warmly,
Your From the Farm Blog Hop Co-Hosts:

The Adventure Bite | Sunny Simple Life | 1840 Farm | Let This Mind Be in You | My Healthy Green Family | Fresh Eggs Daily

 

 

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/06/from-the-farm-blog-hop-36/

Traditions Old and New

Jennifer Burcke at 1840 Farm on The Daily Meal

A few months ago, I was asked by The Daily Meal to share the story of my oldest family recipe.  They went on to ask if I had created a dish that could become a new family tradition.  I couldn’t wait to answer both questions with a single answer:  berry pie.

A homemade berry pie has the power to transport me to my paternal grandmother’s humble kitchen.  My grandmother was a wonderful cook and baker, but pie was her specialty.  Her schwatzenberry pie was my favorite.  It would not be overstating its power to say that those berry pies forever changed my life.

My grandmother’s homemade berry pie taught me that food had the ability to feed my soul. I now know that it also holds the incredible power of transcending time and space, bringing back memories of a grandmother long gone, but known by my children who never had the opportunity to meet her in person.

Instead, they met her memory with the first bite of berry pie savored while listening to me share my fondest memories about her. Every summer, we carefully pick the schwatzenberries from our garden and look forward to the day when we have gathered enough to make the season’s first pie.

Now my love of berry pie has been shared with the world thanks to The Daily Meal.  I’m honored to be mentioned in the same story with the likes of Michael Chiarello, Carla Hall, Marc Murphy, and a collection of other chefs and bloggers who also shared their favorite dishes.

You can see the entire collection in the Kikkoman Tradition Exchange Slideshow.  The collection was assembled and used to introduce The Daily Meal‘s readers to an amazing new documentary, Make Haste Slowly: The Kikkoman Creed.

The documentary from Academy Award nominated filmmaker Lucy Walker tells the inspiring story of the Kikkoman brand.  The mini-documentary traces the evolution of a brand that was started over 300 years ago.  The film also focuses on the bold decision by The Kikkoman Company to begin producing their products in the United States in the 1970s, partnering with Midwestern farmers and local communities.

The film is beautiful and treats the subject with the respect it deserves.  I was particularly taken with the profile of Art Anderson, a retired farmer featured prominently in the film’s narrative.  I challenge you to listen to his personal story without being moved by his dedication and pride.  I was taken with his story and by the fact that he was a dairy farmer before he began his employment at Kikkoman.

Today, I am renewing the traditions of my family’s past and find myself milking our dairy goats in the quiet of our circa 1840 barn.  Apparently, I have more than one family tradition that will be continuing for several years to come.  Luckily, those traditions will ensure that we have homemade berry pie to enjoy with a fresh glass of milk at our family table.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/01/traditions-old-and-new/

Happy First Birthday, Zinnia!

A year ago today, we celebrated a milestone here at 1840 Farm.  We woke up to find three newborn Nigerian Dwarf baby goats in the stall of our barn.  When we first saw them, they were minutes old.  In those first few moments of their life here on our farm, we officially became dairy farmers.  It was a moment that connected me to my Great Grandfather and the dairy farming life he chose over 50 years ago.

A year has passed.  We have collected over 300 pounds of fresh, raw goat’s milk and enjoyed drinking every last drop.  The two bucklings have made their permanent home in Vermont with a wonderful family.  The doeling captured our hearts.  By the time Christmas arrived, our two children made little Zinnia the top request on their wish lists.

Zinnia is a year old today.  She has an incredibly sweet disposition and would spend the afternoon sitting in your lap if invited.  She’s a momma’s girl and spends her days following VIolet and emulating her every move.

In a few years, I hope that Zinnia will have her own babies here on our farm.  I look forward to the morning that we discover her in the quiet of the barn with her newborn kids.  It will be another milestone for my family and I can’t wait to share the whole experience with all of you.

Happy Birthday, Zinnia!  To share the celebration with you, we’re offering a 15% discount on all purchases from The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy this week!  Simply enter coupon code “celebrate” during the checkout process to save 15% on your purchase.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/10/happy-first-birthday-zinnia/

Farmmade.com Q&A

1840 Farm was selected to be Farmmade.com’s Featured Farmer this week.  As part of the process, I completed a Q&A.  Yesterday, the answers were shared with the Farmmade Community on Facebook.  In case you missed it…

Farmmade.com’s Featured Farmer this week is Jennifer Burcke of 1840 Farm! Jennifer and her family produce as much of their own food as possible on their 3.2 acres suburban farm in Dover, New Hampshire. Thank you Jennifer for taking time out to share your farm story with the FarmMade community of farmers and friends!

FARMMADE: WHAT IS THE STORY BEHIND 1840 FARM?1840 Farm Independence Day
JENNIFER: The original farmhouse and barn were built in the 1840s. At one time, the farm encompassed over 100 acres of farmland. Over the years, it was subdivided little by little. By the time that we purchased the farm in 2005, the farmhouse and barn were situated on just over three acres. Over a decade ago, three generations of my family made the life changing decision to move from our home in Kansas to the Seacoast of New Hampshire. A few years later, we purchased what was then an abandoned farm and began the difficult work of bringing it back to life. It’s no coincidence that it is located a mere 100 miles from the dairy farm that my great grandparents proudly called home.

I spend my days living and writing about my passion to embrace the traditions of my past. I wasn’t raised to be a farmer and I would have never imagined that I would feel the gravitational pull to live a country cottage farming lifestyle. Yet here I am, living on a farm with my parents, husband, and two children. Today, it is hard for me to imagine living any other way.

FARMMADE: WHO INFLUENCED YOU TO BECOME A FARMER?
JENNIFER: I was inspired to become a farmer by my family past and present. The memory of my grandparents and great grandparents inspired me to dare to attempt to become a farmer. The daily encouragement and support of my husband, children, and parents motivates me to continue to improve my skills and develop my craft. My goal is to raise food for our table while raising two children who will always hold their food supply firmly within their grasp.

FARMMADE: WHAT DO YOU GROW AND RAISE AT 1840 FARM?
JENNIFER: We keep a flock of 17 heritage breed hens, three Nigerian Dwarf dairy goats, and a French Angora rabbit on our farm. We also tend a large heirloom vegetable garden as well as blueberry and raspberry fields. Last winter, we made our own maple syrup for the first time, collecting 123 pounds of Maple sap before boiling it down into syrup. During the last year, we have collected over 72 dozen eggs and harvested 300 pounds of fruits and vegetables from our gardens. Following the birth of our first goat kids last October, we officially became dairy farmers and have since collected over 40 gallons of raw goat’s milk.

FARMMADE: WHY DO YOU LOVE GROWING FOOD & RAISING FARM ANIMALS?
JENNIFER: I love living and working on our farm with three generations of my family. The work of producing our own food and tending our farm feeds my soul and produces delicious food to be shared while gathered around our family table. The fresh, homegrown food on our dinner plates is the most meaningful reward I can think of for a job well done.

How about biting into a piece of warm 1840 Farm’s Berry Pie or freshly baked Blueberry Gooey Butter Cake? Jennifer shared two delicious seasonal berry dessert recipes in last Friday’s FarmMade newsletter. Check out yesterday’s post for those recipes and enjoy making one (or both!) of these summer time treats in your kitchen for dessert after dinner tonight!

Meet the farm animals of 1840 Farm and see what’s growing in the garden. JOIN US TOMORROW FOR A TOUR OF 1840 FARM!

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/08/farmmade-com-qa/

New Community Chickens Post: A Playground for Chickens

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

A Playground for Chickens (click to continue


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/08/new-community-chickens-post-a-playground-for-chickens/

Product Review: Brinsea EcoGlow Brooder

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

Product Review:  Brinsea EcoGlow Brooder (click to continue)


Click to continue

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/07/product-review-brinsea-ecoglow-brooder/

New Community Chickens Post: Independent’s Day

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

Independent’s Day (click to continue)

Click to continue

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/07/new-community-chickens-post-independents-day/

New Community Chickens Post: How to Prepare for Successful Chick Brooding – Part One

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

How to Prepare for Successful Chick Brooding – Part One (click to continue)

Click to continue

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/06/new-community-chickens-post-how-to-prepare-for-successful-chick-brooding-part-one/

New Community Chickens Post: How to Keep Your Flock Cool This Summer

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

How to Keep Your Flock Cool This Summer (click to continue)

Click to continue

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/06/new-community-chickens-post-how-to-keep-your-flock-cool-this-summer/

New Community Chickens Post: Necessity and Invention

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

Two Essential Chicken Keeping Tools:  Necessity and Invention

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/06/new-community-chickens-post-necessity-and-invention/

New Community Chickens Post: A Year In the Life at 1840 Farm – Month One

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

A Year In the Life at 1840 Farm – Month One

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/06/new-community-chickens-post-a-year-in-the-life-at-1840-farm-month-one/

New Community Chickens Post: Coop Planning

Click to read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

Coop Planning:  Five Features to Incorporate in to Your Coop

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/05/new-community-chickens-post-coop-planning/

New Community Chickens Post: The Best Breed of Chicken for Your Flock

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

The Best Breed of Chicken for Your Flock

(click to view the entire post)

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/05/new-community-chickens-post-the-best-breed-of-chicken-for-your-flock/

New Community Chickens Post: My Pet Chicken (and Yours)

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

My Pet Chicken (and Yours)

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/05/new-community-chickens-post-a-naturally-beautiful-celebration-2/

Nearly Wordless Wednesday – May 2, 2012

1840 Farm has twelve new residents of the feathered variety.  They arrived yesterday and I am happy to report that they are all active and well.  They spent the better part of today exploring and trying to master two very important skills:  eating and getting along with your roommates!

They are adorable and we are all enjoying watching them.  There will be daily pictures and videos to share on our Facebook page, but I wanted to give you all a glimpse of them on their first full. day living at 1840 Farm.  Here they are after we gave them all a health check this afternoon.  Moments later, they were back in their brooding pen warming up and exploring their surroundings.

Stay tuned – there will be an unending supply of chick pictures to share!

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/05/nearly-wordless-wednesday-may-2-2012/

New Community Chickens Post: A Naturally Beautiful Celebration

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

A Naturally Beautiful Celebration

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/04/new-community-chickens-post-a-naturally-beautiful-celebration/

New Community Chickens Post: Welcome to a Year in the Life at 1840 Farm

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

Welcome to a Year in the Life at 1840 Farm


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/03/new-community-chickens-post-welcome-to-a-year-in-the-life-at-1840-farm/

1840 Farm Seed Exchange – Extended One Week

Behold the beautiful power held by the first day of spring.  It’s a day of promise for everyone, but especially for those of us who love to tend the soil and plant a garden.  It seems that I count the lingering seconds all winter long to remind myself that spring really is on the horizon.  Now we’ve made it and it’s time to mark the occasion by dreaming of the coming summer’s garden.

In my recent post announcing the 1840 Farm Seed Exchange, I had mentioned that the seed exchange would kick off on the first day of spring.  Well, if there’s one thing that farming and gardening has taught me, it’s that flexibility is key. A farmer has to be ready to change course at a moment’s notice, willing to throw off their best laid plans and move organically in the direction that time and nature allows them.

I’m doing just that with the 1840 Farm Seed Exchange.  When I proposed this project, I never imagined that gardeners from around the country would still be signing up two weeks after I had invited you all to join.  In fact, the entries were still fluttering into my inbox yesterday afternoon.

I don’t want anyone to miss out on the fun, so I am extending the entry period in order to allow more readers to sign up and participate.  On next Tuesday, March 27, 2012, I will send each participant an Email with the name and address of the person their seed packet should be mailed to.  In the meantime, please encourage your gardening friends and family to join us.  The more people we involve, the more interesting this seed exchange, and our resulting gardening seasons, will be.

To make things a little more interesting, I’ll be awarding one lucky participant an extra prize:  a collection of heirloom seeds for planting in their garden.  The collection will include some of the beloved varieties grown here at 1840 Farm.  I have been busy researching heirloom seed varieties and collecting a few to plant here at 1840 Farm .  As you can see by the collection on the kitchen table, they include vegetable and flower varieties that will be finding their way into our 2012 garden.  I will be sharing a few of these with the lucky winner.  Several of them are species discovered during the Lewis and Clark expedition in 1804-1806.  I can’t wait to plant them in our garden and see them for myself.

If you would like to receive more than one seed packet (and send more than one packet) simply fill out the form as many times as you would like to participate.  The seeds you share can be saved from your garden or purchased from a store.  Gardeners and farmers of all ages and skill levels are welcome (end encouraged) to participate.

Good luck to all of you who participate.  I’ll announce the winner of the 1840 Farm Seed Collection on March 27, I promise!  Until then, I’ll be busy readying our gardens for planting.  Mother Nature has decided to give us temperatures thirty degrees warmer than usual, and I’ll be taking full advantage.  Like I said, a farmer has to be flexible, especially if it gives me an excuse to spend more time in the garden.

The spring 1840 Farm Seed Exchange has closed for 2012.  If you are interested in participating in the 2013 Seed Exchange, leave a comment below and I will contact you next spring when the details are available.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/03/1840-farm-seed-exchange-extended-one-week/

1840 Farm Seed Exchange

The 1840 Farm Seed Exchange has been extended!
Sign up before midnight on Monday, March 26, 2012!

For the last two weeks, I’ve been deep in the midst of a great read.  A truly fascinating tale of the men who shaped our nation and their overpowering love of agriculture.  There’s no need for a spoiler alert warning here:  I won’t be divulging the best bits from the text.  I’ll let you discover the wonder that is this read for yourself.

I will tell you that reading this book got me thinking.  I had known that the men of the Constitutional Convention put quill to parchment and drafted a plan for our fledgling nation.  What I hadn’t realized was that they were writing the future of our nation in the soil at the same time.

These men who would become President believed that our agrarian tendencies were our greatest asset.  George Washington spent his evenings as the leader of the Continental Army planning his beloved tree grove at Mount VernonThomas Jefferson spent every waking moment planning and surveying not only his gardens at Monticello, but the natural landscape of the most respected gardens in the world with James Madison often at his side.  Benjamin Franklin, though he would never become President, smuggled seeds out of Europe in correspondence to his wife and son back in the colonies for fear that the British government might attempt to limit the seeds available to colonists.

These men gathered together to discuss the course that our nation would take and found themselves talking about planting crops instead.  They shared seeds with each other and hoped that together they could learn how to be more capable gardeners, more successful farmers.  Farming was their passion, their chosen profession.  In fact, on a visit to Monticello last year, the tour guide proudly told my daughter that Thomas Jefferson, on the occasion of the first census of this country proudly listed his occupation as “farmer”.  It’s worth noting that he was serving as the Secretary of State at the time.

More than two centuries have passed since then.  I find myself living on a farm that dates back to within fifteen years of the death of Jefferson.  When we moved here, it had been abandoned for several years.  No one had been tending to its gardens.  No one had been growing anything on its grounds.  It was a lonely and desolate place.

Six years later, we are cultivating not only a garden that feeds our family, but a lifestyle that brings us closer together every day.  1840 Farm has literally come back to life.  Last October, when three goats were born within the walls of our beloved barn, we knew that we had proudly proclaimed to all who were listening that we were farmers as well.  We had fed our souls and breathed life back into the farm that we call home.

Reading Andrea Wulf’s Founding Gardeners made me look at our farm differently.  In fact, I started to look at farming differently.  It made me want to run outside and plant our gardens, tend to the soil, and feel the sun on my face.  Glancing at the calendar, I was reminded that planting season has yet to arrive.  The ground is frozen solid and snow is blanketing the gardens and grounds.  Planting would have to wait.

But why couldn’t we emulate the best of our founding fathers and spend time planning our gardens, sharing our gardening knowledge, and dreaming of the sunny days to come?  If you ask me, an old-fashioned seed exchange is in order.  For the cost of a stamp, we can all look forward to receiving a packet of seeds from another gardener who is also counting the minutes until spring finally arrives.

Heirloom Tomatoes at 1840 FarmOn the first day of spring, Tuesday, March 20, 2012Tuesday, March 27, 2012, I will send an Email to each participant with the name and address of the person their seed packet should be mailed to.  If you would like to receive more than one seed packet (and send more than one packet) simply fill out the form as many times as you would like to participate.  The seeds you share can be saved from your garden or purchased from a store.  Gardeners and farmers of all ages and skill levels are welcome (end encouraged) to participate.

Encourage your friends and family to join in.  The more people we have sharing seeds, the more interesting this seed exchange will be!  To make things a little more interesting, I’ll be awarding one lucky participant an extra prize:  a collection of heirloom seeds for planting in their garden.  The collection will include some of the beloved varieties grown here at 1840 Farm.

Good luck to all of you who participate.  I’ll announce the winner of the 1840 Farm Seed Collection on March 20 March 27!

 

The spring 1840 Farm Seed Exchange has closed for 2012.  If you are interested in participating in the 2013 Seed Exchange, leave a comment below and I will contact you next spring when the details are available.

The spring 1840 Farm Seed Exchange has closed for 2012.  If you are interested in participating in the 2013 Seed Exchange, leave a comment below and I will contact you next spring when the details are available.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/03/1840-farm-seed-exchange/

New Community Chickens Post: Cue the Sun (or a Compact Fluorescent Light Bulb)

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

Cue the Sun (or a Compact Fluorescent Light Bulb)

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/01/new-community-chickens-post-the-birth-of-a-new-season-2/

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