Found 238 search results for keyword: recipe

Farmhouse Style Cast Iron Skillet Meatloaf

Farmhouse Style Cast Iron Skillet Meatloaf

In my book, there’s nothing more comforting on a cold winter’s night than meatloaf and mashed potatoes. If that meatloaf can be prepared in a cast iron skillet, all the better. Comfort food from a cast iron skillet is just the sort of farmhouse style comfort food my family clamors for on a wintry New England day.

A cast iron skillet is perfectly suited for making meatloaf. It holds the heat well, ensuring that the meatloaf bakes evenly. The same skillet can be used to sauté the vegetables and herbs that will be incorporated into the meatloaf before being used to bake the meatloaf in the oven. Reducing the number of dishes I need to use and clean while prepping dinner is always a welcome development in my kitchen.

Once you’ve made this cast iron skillet meatloaf, you’ll be left wondering why you ever baked meatloaf in a loaf pan. My loaf pan may be feeling a bit lonely, because I’ve never made meatloaf in that pan since discovering that I could bake it so perfectly in my cast iron skillet!

Farmhouse Style Cast Iron Skillet Meatloaf
Serves 6
I like to incorporate Italian sausage into the ground beef or buffalo that I use in this recipe. The combination results in a wonderfully seasoned, delicious meatloaf. If you like more spice, you could certainly use spicy Italian sausage with equally delicious results. I often double this recipe and use my large 12 inch cast iron skillet to bake a larger meatloaf. Then I am able to look forward to serving leftovers the next night. Like most savory dishes, this meatloaf is even more delicious the second night!
Print
Cook Time
1 hr
Cook Time
1 hr
Ingredients
  1. 1 Tablespoon lard
  2. 1 Large onion, finely diced
  3. 3 garlic cloves, minced
  4. 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  5. 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  6. 8 ounces Italian sausage, removed from the casing
  7. 16 ounces ground grass fed beef or buffalo
  8. 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
  9. 1/3 cup old fashioned oats
  10. 2 large eggs
  11. 2 ounces mozzarella cheese, shredded
  12. ¼ cup ketchup
  13. 1 Tablespoon soy sauce
  14. 1 Tablespoon brown sugar
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Warm an 8-9 inch cast iron skillet over medium heat. Add the lard, swirling the pan to coat the bottom surface of the skillet. Add the onions and cook until translucent. Add the garlic, thyme, and rosemary, stirring for one minute to prevent the garlic from burning. Remove the pan from the heat.
  3. In a large bowl, combine the ground beef or buffalo with the Italian sausage that has been removed from its casing. Add the tomato paste, sautéed onion mixture, oats, and eggs. Mix to fully combine the ingredients.
  4. Transfer about half of the mixture to the cast iron skillet, pressing to evenly cover the bottom of the skillet. Sprinkle the shredded mozzarella cheese over the top before covering with the remaining ground meat mixture. Press the meat mixture to the edges of the skillet. The mixture should reach the edges of the skillet and be an even thickness to ensure that it will bake evenly.
  5. In a small bowl, combine the ketchup, soy sauce, and brown sugar. Spread this mixture over the top of the ground meat. Transfer the skillet to the warm oven and bake for 50 to 60 minutes. When the meatloaf is finished, it will begin to pull away from the edges of the pan and register at 160 degrees on a meat thermometer.
  6. Remove the meatloaf from the oven and allow to cool for five minutes before slicing into wedges and serving. We love to enjoy this meatloaf with Colcannon Style Mashed Potatoes. The combination of meatloaf, potatoes, and cabbage is a favorite at our farmhouse table.
1840farm.com http://1840farm.com/

 

 


 

To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2016/01/farmhouse-style-cast-iron-skillet-meatloaf/

Deep and Dark Chocolate Brownies

Deep and Dark Chocolate Brownies BrandedWhen we need a warm and comforting dessert, this brownie recipe immediately comes to mind. I’d love to take credit for baking them, but these are my daughter’s triumph. She began making them a few years ago and quickly became the brownie baker in our family.

We enjoy these amazing brownies all year long, but they’re especially popular during the deep, dark New England winter. When the snow is falling outside and the temperatures are cruel, comfort food is needed. A warm brownie packed with chocolate is just what the doctor ordered on those dark days.

This recipe is simple to follow and the results are delicious. The brownies are fudgy and packed with chocolate flavor. They can easily be adapted to include different types of additions, making the possibilities nearly endless.

No matter what you choose to add to this recipe, I can promise that the results will be delicious. Your family and friends will come to request these fabulous brownies as much as our family and my daughter’s friends do. Prepare to become the brownie baker in your family once they’ve had a taste of these delicious brownies!

Deep and Dark Chocolate Brownies
We keep this brownie recipe interesting by including a variety of different additions. You can add in 2 cups of your favorite brownie mix-ins from chocolate chips to flavored baking chips, nuts, or even coarsely chopped candies that bake well. This holiday season, we found ourselves using 1 cup of bittersweet chocolate chips and 1 cup of chopped Hershey’s Candy Cane KISSES. The results were festive, beautiful, and delicious!
Print
Ingredients
  1. 4 ounces (1 stick) butter, softened and cubed
  2. 192 grams (1 cup) granulated sugar
  3. 1 Tablespoon homemade vanilla extract
  4. 2 large eggs
  5. 60 grams (1/2 cup) All-purpose flour
  6. 40 grams (1/2 cup) cocoa powder
  7. ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  8. ¼ teaspoon sea salt
  9. 2 cups chocolate chips, flavored baking chips, or other delicious additions
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a 9x9 baking pan with parchment paper to prevent the brownies from sticking to the pan as they bake.
  2. Combine the softened butter and sugar in a large mixing bowl. Using a mixer, beat until the mixture is smooth and creamy before adding the vanilla extract. Add the eggs and beat to fully incorporate.
  3. In a small bowl, combine the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt. Add your chosen chocolate chips or other additions and stir lightly to evenly distribute them throughout the dry ingredients.
  4. Add the dry ingredients in a single addition to the butter mixture. Beat just long enough to fully incorporate the dry ingredients. Take care not to overmix.
  5. Using a spatula, transfer the batter to the prepared baking pan. The batter will be very thick. Spread the batter to evenly cover the bottom of the pan.
  6. Bake in the preheated oven for 25-30 minutes or until just set. Because of their fudgy texture and high chocolate content, the brownies can seem underbaked. Once they have cooled to room temperature, they will set up nicely. Resist the urge to overbake them and you’ll be rewarded with delicious fudge like brownies.
  7. Allow the brownies to cool to room temperature. If desired, sprinkle lightly with powdered sugar or top with a scoop of vanilla ice cream before serving. Enjoy!
Notes
  1. Our family lives and bakes around nut allergies, so our farmhouse kitchen is nut free. This recipe uses one of our nut free favorites: Vermont Nut Free Chocolates baking pieces and cocoa powder. You can learn all about them at www.vermontnutfree.com.
1840farm.com http://1840farm.com/

To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/12/deep-and-dark-chocolate-brownies/

Leftover Thanksgiving Turkey and Potato Hash

Leftover Thanksgiving Turkey Hash in a Cast Iron Skillet at 1840 FarmIn my opinion, Thanksgiving leftovers don’t get the respect they deserve.  A feast on Thursday can produce enough leftovers for an entire weekend of delicious meals and sandwiches.  Any leftover turkey can be transformed into something completely new and delicious with very little effort.

I originally started making a Cast Iron Skillet Pork and Potato Hash with leftovers from our Beer and Brown Sugar Braised Pork.  It was always a hit at our family table and became just as popular as the pork we enjoy the first night for dinner.  Soon, we were making braised pork with this hash in mind and eagerly anticipating the second night’s delicious dinner.

It stood to reason that leftover Thanksgiving turkey would be just as delicious when transformed into hash.  It was.  Year after year, this hash is just as popular as the pork version we enjoy.  It’s also a dish that celebrates those Thanksgiving leftovers while creating something completely different to serve at our family table.

I hope that your family will enjoy it just as much as mine does!

 

Leftover Thanksgiving Turkey and Potato Hash
This recipe makes use of one of my favorite pans: a cast iron skillet. I like to use my Lodge 12 inch cast iron skillet when preparing this hash. If your skillet is smaller, you can reduce the proportions to fit your pan. I love to use homemade bone broth for this recipe when I have it on hand, but an equal amount of good quality stock can be used. If you have any roasted carrots, parsnips, or other root vegetables leftover from your Thanksgiving feast, add them in. The results will be completely new and delicious!
Print
Ingredients
  1. 1 Tablespoon butter
  2. 1 large onion, diced
  3. 3 cloves garlic, minced
  4. 2 ½ pounds potatoes, washed and cut into ½ inch cubes
  5. ¼ teaspoon dried thyme
  6. 12 ounces homemade bone broth or good quality stock
  7. 8 ounces shredded turkey
  8. 2 ounces heavy cream
  9. salt and pepper to taste
  10. 2 ounces smoked cheddar, grated
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Position an oven rack in the middle of the oven.
  2. Heat a large cast iron skillet over medium high heat. Add the butter to the hot pan and swirl to coat the bottom surface. Add the onion and cook until almost translucent, about five minutes. Add the garlic and cook one minute before adding the potatoes to the pan, stirring to combine.
  3. Add the thyme and bone broth to the pan. Bring the liquid to a simmer. Cover the pan and reduce the heat to low. Cook for 10 minutes undisturbed.
  4. Remove the cover and stir the mixture. The potatoes should have begun to soften and absorbed some of the liquid. Add the turkey and heavy cream to the pan and stir to combine. Taste for seasoning, adding salt and pepper to taste. Press the mixture firmly into the pan and top with the grated cheddar. Transfer the skillet to the warm oven.
  5. Cook the hash for ten minutes. Check the potatoes for doneness before turning on the broiler. Broil for two minutes to brown the top surface of the hash. Remove from the oven and serve hot.
1840farm.com http://1840farm.com/

This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

thanksgiving-gallery-ss


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/leftover-thanksgiving-turkey-hash/

How to Make Thanksgiving Turkey Bone Broth

ThanksgivingTurkeyBoneBrothBone broth is the simplest of preparations and yields such delicious and nutritious results. It requires no fancy ingredients and doesn’t demand constant attention. Given enough time and heat, the bones break down, releasing all of their gelatin and minerals into the liquid. The resulting bone broth is rich in protein, gelatin, and minerals and adds a beautiful color and flavor to any dish. Best of all, you can create this amazing broth using leftovers that would normally be discarded.

Until a few years ago, I had never made my own bone broth. I had created my own stock and quick broth with good success, but didn’t fully understand the difference between the three kitchen staples and therefore didn’t realize that I could create something with more flavor and nutrition without creating any extra work for myself in the kitchen.

Thanksgiving is the perfect time to try your hand at making bone broth. A whole turkey can produce enough bones to make several batches of bone broth. When the turkey has been carved and only the carcass remains from your Thanksgiving feast, the process of making the first batch of bone broth in your slow cooker can begin. The bone broth that results will be full of healthy calcium, magnesium, phosphorous, collagen, and a host of other nutritious minerals.

The process of making bone broth is simple. Reserve all that is left from the carcass of your turkey and any vegetables in the roasting pan. I like to place our turkey on a bed of carrots, onions, and parsnips rather than using a metal rack. These vegetables prevent the turkey from sticking to the pan as it roasts and also flavor the pan juices. After roasting the turkey, these vegetables can be scraped from the roasting pan and added to the slow cooker. They will add flavor and color to the finished bone broth.

When the meal is finished, transfer the roasting pan’s vegetables to the ceramic insert of a large slow cooker. Add approximately a third of the bones from a whole turkey and enough water to completely cover the bones and vegetables. Add two Tablespoons of apple cider vinegar and allow the ingredients to rest for an hour. The vinegar helps to extract the calcium from the bones, making a richer and more nutritious bone broth.

Transfer the remaining bones to a freezer bag. Those bones can be frozen for later use. When making bone broth using frozen bones, allow the bones to come to room temperature before proceeding with the cooking process.

After the bones have spent an hour in the water and vinegar, turn your slow cooker on at high heat. Once the liquid has come to a boil, you can reduce the heat to low. The liquid should remain at a simmer as the broth cooks. Leave the lid securely on the pot to reduce the amount of liquid that evaporates away from the pot. If you notice that the liquid level has dropped dramatically as the broth cooks, you can add more water if needed.

Bone Broth after 24 Hours at 1840 Farm Bone Broth after 48 Hours at 1840 Farm Bone Broth after 72 Hours at 1840 Farm

The longer the broth simmers, the richer the broth becomes both in flavor, color, and nutrition. While you can stop the process at any point, I like to let the broth simmer for 72 hours. As you can see, the broth takes on a beautifully rich color the longer it is allowed to develop in the slow cooker.

If you’re wondering how to know when your bone broth is finished, the process is simple. Remove a bone from the pot of liquid. WhenCrumbline Bones from Bone Broth at 1840 Farm the bones have released all of their mineral content, they will crumble in your hands with very little pressure. This crumbling signals that the bone broth is finished.

At this point, the slow cooker can be turned off. I allow the broth to cool to room temperature before straining it through a colander lined with cheesecloth. Discard any bones, vegetables, or scraps, straining the broth a second time if any solids remain.

I fill one large Mason jar with bone broth to store in the refrigerator, using it in any recipe that calls for stock or broth. I freeze the rest using either ice cube trays or silicone baking cups before transferring to a freezer bag for long term storage. I use this frozen broth as I would fresh, adding it to any recipes that call for broth or stock.

Our bone broth never lasts very long in the freezer as we continue to find new ways to incorporate it into our favorite recipes. The flavor, aroma, and color are so superior to standard broth that I only regret that I didn’t start making bone broth sooner. Once you discover the simplicity of making homemade bone broth and its amazing depth of flavor, you’ll be wondering the same thing!

 


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

thanksgiving-gallery-ss


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/how-to-make-thanksgiving-turkey-bone-broth/

Colcannon Style Mashed Potatoes

Colcannon Style Mashed Potatoes at 1840 Farm

When it comes to mashed potato recipes, making them colcannon style is my family’s favorite way to enjoy them. Colcannon is an Irish dish that probably came to this country in the early 1800s with the Irish immigrants who brought the flavor of their beloved homeland with them. Traditionally, it combines potatoes, butter, cream, leeks, and cabbage into one comforting dish that is equal parts potato puree and hearty cabbage.

Colcannon was strongly associated with the Halloween holiday in Ireland. There are countless legends about groups of young Irish women participating in a ritual of going to the family garden to select a cabbage to be used in the night’s colcannon. Before serving the colcannon at the family table, a small ring would be hidden inside. The young woman at the table who discovered the ring in her serving was predicted to find herself married before the next Halloween arrived.

Here at 1840 Farm, we enjoy the folklore that accompanies this dish, but prepare it time and time again for its delicious flavor. We enjoy it all year long, not wanting to relegate it to a single Halloween meal during our calendar year. I love how this recipe beautifully combines potatoes, butter, cream, leeks, and sautéed cabbage into one harmonious and delicious dish. The earthiness from the cabbage elevates the flavor of the potatoes and lends beauty and a depth of flavor to each bite.

I find that colcannon is a lovely addition to the Thanksgiving meal. It pairs deliciously with roasted turkey, gravy, and our other favorite holiday side dishes. If you don’t care for the flavor of cabbage, you can easily omit it from the recipe and produce a lovely mashed potato dish for your celebration.

As much as I love to make and enjoy mashed potatoes in our farmhouse kitchen, I receive countless messages and pleas for help from my readers who are frustrated by the process. They’ve tried so many different recipes and have yet to create the lovely, creamy mashed potatoes they’re dreaming of.

Making amazing mashed potatoes is simple once you understand the role a potato’s starch plays in the finished texture of the dish. You don’t need fancy tools or ingredients, just a few simple techniques for controlling the starch contained in the potatoes you’re working with.

First, carefully choose the type of potato you use and the method of preparing them for boiling. Yukon Golds are my preferred type of potato to use when making mashed potatoes. They are waxy and ideally suited for creating a smooth mashed potato. I love their flavor and texture and use them when creating any mashed potato recipe.

Next, let’s discuss preparing the potatoes for cooking. I like to resist cutting the potatoes into small pieces before boiling. The more surface area you create, the more water will be absorbed by the boiling potatoes, causing the starch molecules to swell and absorb too much water. Instead, cut the potatoes into pieces approximately 2” square which allows the potatoes to cook quickly without soaking up too much liquid.

As soon as the potatoes are fork tender, remove the boiled potatoes from the hot water immediately to a colander. Allow the hot potatoes to drain for a few moments before returning them to the pan. Use a potato ricer or an old fashioned potato masher to break down the potatoes. Do not use a blender, mixer, or food processor to mash your potatoes as they will over work the starch molecules and produce gummy mashed potatoes that no amount of butter or cream will be able to tame.

Finally, do not add cold liquid to the boiled potatoes. A hot, steaming pile of potatoes doused in cold liquid will seize up due to the drastic difference in temperature, producing and releasing far too much starch to create the velvety smooth dish we all love. Instead, warm your liquids before adding them to the cooked potatoes. You’ll be amazed at the difference in texture and rewarded with glorious mashed potatoes to serve at your family table.

Colcannon Style Mashed Potatoes
I like a rustic mashed potato dish, so I skip the step of peeling the potatoes before boiling. If you prefer, you can peel the potatoes before boiling. If you choose to omit the cabbage and leeks from the dish to make a traditional mashed potato, be sure to warm the liquids before incorporating them into the potatoes. I like to use the remaining cabbage to make our Classic Sauerkraut.
Print
Ingredients
  1. One half head of green cabbage, core removed and finely shredded
  2. 1 leek, halved lengthwise, sliced thinly, and soaked and drained to remove grit
  3. 1 Tablespoon lard or butter
  4. 1 cup bone broth or high quality stock
  5. ½ cup whole milk
  6. ¼ cup heavy cream
  7. 3 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, washed and cut into 2” cubes
  8. butter for serving
  9. salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. In a medium saucepan over medium high heat, melt the lard or butter, coating the bottom surface of the pan. Add the cabbage and washed and cleaned leeks. Season with salt and pepper. Sauté until translucent. Add bone broth, milk, and cream to the pot and bring to a simmer. Reduce heat to low to steep the flavor of the cabbage and leeks into the liquid. Keep the mixture warm as you prepare the potatoes.
  2. In a large pot, combine the cubed potatoes with enough cold water to cover and allow them to move freely as they boil. Place the pot over a burner on high heat, bringing it to a rapid boil. Reduce the heat as needed to maintain the boil but prevent the pot from boiling over. Continue to cook until the potatoes are fork or knife tender, approximately 15 minutes.
  3. Immediately remove the pot from the heat and drain the potatoes in a colander. Allow the hot potatoes to drain for a few minutes before continuing. You can use a potato ricer to break down the potatoes or return the cubed potatoes to the boiling pot to mash using an old fashioned potato masher. Take care to mash the potatoes without overworking them.
  4. Add half of the warm liquid mixture to the pot, stirring it into the mashed potatoes. Continue adding more liquid until the mashed potatoes are the desired consistency. If you find that you need more liquid, simply warm a bit of bone broth, cream, or milk before adding it to the potato mixture. Taste the potatoes, seasoning with salt and pepper as needed. Serve hot with an ample topping of butter.
1840farm.com http://1840farm.com/

 

 


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

thanksgiving-gallery-ss


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/colcannon-mashed-potataoes/

Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie – Nut Free

Nut Free Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie As a child, every Thanksgiving and Christmas was celebrated with my paternal grandmother’s homemade pies. She always had a collection of them fresh out of the oven, ready to mark the end of another family meal. I could always count on finding some sort of seasonal pie along with pecan and her famous schwatzenberry.

ChocolateBourbonPecanPieTopThose warm memories have stayed with me over the years. They’ve also ensured that we mark Thanksgiving and Christmas celebrations with homemade pies at our farmhouse table.   Because of the food allergies we cook and bake around, we haven’t always been able to enjoy the flavor of a pecan pie at our family table. I missed the earthy, nutty flavor of pecan pie, but there was simply no safe way to enjoy the flavor without worry of cross contamination and allergic reactions.

It was almost five years ago that I first discovered that I could create completely nut free baked goods in our farmhouse kitchen that had the delicious nutty flavor we were missing due to nut allergies.  Wheat Nuts® became a pantry staple, allowing me to bring back a few flavors from my past without introducing nuts into our home.

Sadly, Wheat Nuts® products disappeared from the market in 2013, leaving us without the ingredient and snack we loved so much. Earlier this year, I received the wonderful news that these nut free and tasty snacks were being produced and were available to purchase. It was a moment worth celebrating in our nut free kitchen. When we discovered that there was an entirely new collection of nut free snacks and ingredients being offered, I couldn’t wait to place my order and start creating new recipes to enjoy during the holiday season and beyond.

You can order the following varieties which are all manufactured in a 100% nut free facility:Wheat Nuts and Nadanut

Wheat Nuts®
Nadanut® Salted Pecans
Nadanut® Unsalted Pecans
Nadanut® Salted Cashews
Nadanut® small chopped pecan pieces
Nadanut® medium chopped pecan pieces
Nadanut® small chopped walnut pieces
Nadanut® small chopped pistachio pieces

For the first time in far too many years, I will be serving this nut free pecan pie at our Thanksgiving table.  I hope that you will join us in serving this delicious pie to your friends and family and that they will enjoy it as much as we do.

Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie

In our nut free home, we use Nadanut® snacks to add the flavor of pecans without any worry of allergens paying a visit to our family table. If you aren’t baking with nut allergies in mind, you can easily substitute 2 cups of pecans in this recipe with delicious results. If you find yourself struggling when making homemade pie crust, read my simple pie crust tips and make flaky, delicious pie crust like a pro.

1 ½ cups (180 grams) All-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon salt
4 ounces (1 stick) butter, grated
4-6 Tablespoons ice water

2 Tablespoons butter
¾ cup bittersweet chocolate chips or chunks
2 Tablespoons heavy cream
2 large eggs
1 cup (120 grams) dark brown sugar
¼ cup maple syrup
2 Tablespoons bourbon
1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup Nadanut® small chopped pecan pieces
½ cup Nadanut® Unsalted Pecans
½ cup Nadanut® medium chopped pecan pieces

To make the crust, place flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor.  Pulse the dry ingredients to combine.  Add the grated butter and pulse until the butter has begun to incorporate into the flour and resembles small grains of rice.

With the motor running, add ice water one Tablespoon at a time until the dough forms a ball.  Take care not to over process the dough.  Over processing will help to develop the gluten in the flour and lead to a crust that is chewy and tough.  Less is more when it comes to working pie crust and will result in a flaky, light crust.

Transfer the pie crust dough to a pie plate.  Using your fingers, press the dough into shape gently until it is a uniform thickness and completely covers the bottom and sides of the pie plate. Work around the plate, rolling any excess crust underneath to form a thick ridge along the edge of the pie.  Using your fingers, flute the edge of the crust or use a fork to crimp along the edge.  Continue until the entire perimeter has been sealed. Transfer the pie plate to the refrigerator to chill while the oven warms and the filling is prepared.

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit.  Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil to catch any pie filling that may bubble over during baking.  Set aside.

In a small pan set over low heat, warm the butter and chocolate until melted and smooth, stirring often to prevent scorching. Remove the pan from the heat and add the heavy cream, stirring until completely smooth.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the eggs, sugar, and maple syrup. Whisk until smooth. Add the bourbon, vanilla, and salt. Stir to combine before adding the Nadanut® pieces (or pecans). Add the melted chocolate mixture to the bowl and stir until the filling is well combined.

Remove the pie plate from the refrigerator. Transfer the filling to the pie plate, spreading evenly. Place the pie on top of the prepared baking sheet and transfer it to the preheated oven.  Bake for 55 minutes or until the top of the filling has developed a crisp golden brown shell and the pie crust is evenly brown.  Rotating the pie midway through the baking time will help to ensure that your pie is evenly baked.

Remove the pie from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool.  Serve warm or at room temperature.  Top with vanilla ice cream or freshly whipped cream if desired.

Our family lives and bakes around nut allergies, so our farmhouse kitchen is nut free.  This recipe uses one of our nut free favorites: Nadanut Nut Free Snacks.  You can learn all about them at www.nadanut.com

 


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

thanksgiving-gallery-ss


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/chocolate-bourbon-pecan-pie-nut-free/

1840 Farmhouse DIY: Glittery Pumpkins

1840 Farmhoue DIYA few weeks ago, I promised to share a few simple projects to help decorate your Thanksgiving table. First up are these glittery pumpkins.  Our Thanksgiving holiday just wouldn’t seem complete without them.

We have been using these glittery pumpkins to decorate the farmhouse for years. They are on display from late September until we put away the fall decor to decorate for Christmas. These pumpkins are ideally suited for decorating your home for fall and bringing a little sparkle to your Thanksgiving table. We have a pair in the farmhouse kitchen, a few in the dining room, and I love to keep a couple in my studio.  They catch the sunlight shining in through the window behind my sewing machine and brighten up my space.

This is a simple project that the kids will love helping with. My daughter helped me make these many years ago. The steps are simple to follow, don’t require any potentially dangerous tools, and the active time needed to complete them is short. Add in the fun of painting with glue and liberally applying sparkly glitter, and it’s easy to see why kids will love helping to create these fabulous pumpkins.

While it was many years ago when my young daughter helped me to make our glittery little pumpkins, I think of that moment in time every time I see them. It’s really no wonder that I look forward to decorating the farmhouse with them every year.  I hope that you will making and decorating your home with these glittery little pumpkins as much as we do here at 1840 Farm!

Glittery Decorative Pumpkins

Craft pumpkins are available in a variety of shapes and sizes.  I find that they are deeply discounted as soon as Halloween has passed. When selecting glue, choose one that dries clear in order to allow the color of the pumpkin to be visible. While any color of glitter can be used, I prefer to use clear glitter in order to allow the color of the pumpkin to shine through.

Glittery Pumpkins at 1840 Farm Glittery Pumpkin at 1840 Farm Glittery Pumpkins at 1840 Farm

Glittery Pumpkin Supplies at 1840 Farm Glue on Glittery Pumpkins at 1840 Farm Applying Glitter to Pumpkins at 1840 Farm

Materials and Tools Needed

Craft pumpkins
Clear drying glue
Brush for applying glue
Glitter

I like to cover my work surface with freezer paper before beginning a project that involves paint or glue.  The nonstick surface makes cleanup a breeze.  I also like to apply the glitter over a large plastic container.  The large container will catch any excess glitter.  This way, no glitter goes to waste as I can reuse that glitter to apply to the next pumpkin or return it to the container of glitter for my next project.

Remove any labels from the craft pumpkins as the clear drying glue and clear glitter will allow them to show through.  Apply an even layer of glue to the bottom of a pumpkin.  Sprinkle glitter over the glue, shaking the pumpkin lightly to remove any excess glitter.  Set the pumpkin upside down to dry fully.  Repeat with other pumpkins until they have all had glitter applied to their bottom surface.  When dry, the glue will be clear.

After the bottoms of the pumpkins are completely dry and no longer tacky, apply glue to the remaining surface of each pumpkin.  Sprinkle glitter liberally over the glue, shaking lightly to remove excess glitter.  Repeat with the other pumpkins and set aside until the pumpkins are completely dry.  Touch up any bare spots if needed, adding more glue and glitter to fully cover the surface of the pumpkins.

We have used our glittery pumpkins for many years and find that they have retained their fabulous glittery appearance.  When fall gives way to Christmas, we wrap each pumpkin in a sheet of tissue paper and pack them away until the next year.


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes and crafts all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes and DIY projects right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

ThanksgivingGallery1111

 


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/1840-farmhouse-diy-glittery-pumpkins/

Homemade Fresh Pumpkin Purée

Homemade Fresh Pumpkin Puree at 1840 FarmFor me, Thanksgiving would be incomplete without a homemade pumpkin pie. In fact, I hold pumpkin pie in such high regard that I spent weeks perfecting my artwork of a pumpkin pie for our Etsy Shop.

For years, I made my pumpkin pie using canned pumpkin purée. Organic canned pumpkin purée was readily available at my local grocery store and both the color and flavor were good enough to be included in our holiday pumpkin pie. Then I noticed that the supply seemed to dwindle each year and the price increased every season. Suddenly, I began to wonder if I could make my own homemade pumpkin purée.

We had some sugar pie pumpkins from our garden that year and our local farmer’s markets and farm stands had them in abundance and at a very affordable price. Once I made my first batch, I found myself wondering why I hadn’t started making my own fresh pumpkin purée sooner. The process was simple, hands off, and produced a thick, rich purée full of fresh flavor.

This homemade pumpkin purée will be featured in the pumpkin pie at our Thanksgiving feast this year. Now you can follow this simple recipe and make your own fresh pumpkin purée for yours!

PumpkinPureeFinalHomemade Fresh Pumpkin Purée

I choose small Sugar Pie Pumpkins for my homemade purée. I find that they are full of earthy pumpkin flavor and are easy to work with. Their small size makes them easy to handle and fit two or mPumpkinPureeSeedsPulpore in the slow cooker at once. A small pumpkin that weighs around 1 ½ pounds will produce approximately one pound of purée, slightly more than a single can of store bought pumpkin purée.

Wash the pumpkins to remove any dirt and debris from the exterior. Using a sharp knife, quarter the pumpkin and remove the stem. With a spoon, remove the seeds and pulpy flesh connecting the seeds to the pumpkin.

I reserve this pumpkin to share with our hens. You can read my post to learn more about pumpkin’s health benefits for your hens and learn how to make them a warm, nutritious oatmeal. The seeds and flesh provide our flock with a delicious and healthy treat.

Place the pumpkin quarters in the slow cooker. Place the cover on the slow cooker and turn the heat on high.

At the two hour mark, check the pumpkin for doneness with the tip of a sharp knife or fork. It should easily yield and be soft and fully cooked. At this point, I turn off the heat, return the lid to the pot, and allow the pumpkin to cool to room temperature.

When cool, scrape the tender pulp from the skin using a large spoon. Purée the pulp in a food processor, blender, or by hand with a potato masher.

Homemade pumpkin purée can be used immediately, stored for several days in the refrigerator, or frozen for up to one year.

This process can also be used with other winter squashes to create homemade squash puree for soups and savory dishes.

 


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

thanksgiving-gallery-ss


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/homemade-fresh-pumpkin-puree/

An 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Celebration

Fall at 1840 Farm

For me, Thanksgiving is a holiday marked by time spent with family gathered around the table and the delicious tastes of our favorite holiday dishes. I have fond childhood memories of Thanksgiving meals prepared by my paternal grandmother and a team of aunts and uncles. The food was delicious and comforting and the conversation was lively. There was laughter and joy at that table and the meal always ended with my grandmother’s homemade pies.

It’s really no wonder that Thanksgiving traditions have remained so strong over the years. A day that combines family, friends, and comforting homemade food is a holiday to cherish. In many ways, our annual celebration is much like the original harvest celebration that took place 400 years ago, a celebration of all that we are grateful for in our daily lives and the marking of the end of another year’s homegrown harvest of fresh food from our gardens.

The Thanksgiving meal has evolved significantly over the years, but its importance has not diminished.  The first feast would have probably featured wild fowl instead of our modern-day turkey. History tells us that there would not have been cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, or pumpkin pie at that first celebration.  When they sat down to enjoy their meal, the settler’s sugar stores had been depleted, the potato had not yet made its way to North America, and using butter and flour to make a pie crust was a luxury far beyond their wildest imagination.ThanksgivingSquashDecor

Instead, their celebration would have revolved around food that was seasonal,  rustic, simple, and local.  Most likely, it would have featured venison and seafood that had been hunted and caught by the men of the group along with corn, beans, and squash from the land that they had tended during the growing season.  The celebration took place over a series of days instead of at a single meal.

By the mid-1800s, sage dressing and mashed potatoes had begun to take their place on a traditional Thanksgiving table.  In 1863, Abraham Lincoln made Thanksgiving a national holiday.  Since then, we have been marking the day and celebrating with our favorite dishes.

Three generations of my family will gather around our farmhouse table for our Thanksgiving meal in a house that was built at a time before Thanksgiving was declared a national holiday.  I will inevitably turn my thoughts towards all that I am thankful for.  The list is too long to mention, but family, friends, and our life here on the farm are all at the top of my list.

I am also thankful for you, Dear Reader.  You have inspired me to continue telling my family’s story and have returned the favor by sharing yours.  I have enjoyed learning about your farms and families as much as I have enjoyed sharing news from mine.  So, on this holiday that celebrates family, friends, and food enjoyed together, I wish you a day overflowing with all three.  I hope that you have a holiday filled to the brim with laughter, memories in the making, and those nearest and dearest to you.

 

 


Here’s a peek at a few of the recipes that will be found on our Thanksgiving table.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

You can click on any of the photos to visit the original post so that you can add them to your celebration.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/1840farm_thanksgiving/

Nut Free Pecanless Pie Bars

It was almost five years ago that I first discovered that I could create completely nut free baked goods in our farmhouse kitchen that had the delicious nutty flavor we were missing due to nut allergies.  Our home has been nut free for nearly a decade since we discovered that our son has food allergies.  Suddenly, the peanuts and tree nuts that we had turned to as nutritious snacks and baking ingredients were off limits.

I learned to enjoy brownies and cookies that didn’t contain nuts.  I even experimented until I found a peanut butter replacement that could be used to create a tasty substitute for peanut butter cookies.  But there were a few recipes that I just couldn’t seem to create nut free versions of.  Pecan pie, peanut brittle, and trail mix were eventually written off as something that we just couldn’t make in our kitchen.

Then I discovered a product called Wheat Nuts®.  I doubted that they would have the nutty flavor we missed so much, but I couldn’t help but give them a hopeful taste.  I was so happy to be wrong after taking the first bite and enjoying the flavor of nuts all over again.

I came to learn that Wheat Nuts® had been developed in the late 1970s, well before nut allergies became such a common issue for so many families.  I was so grateful to be able to keep our pantry stocked with them and set to work on recipes for the elusive pecan pie and peanut brittle.

As I was working to perfect my pecan pie filling in time for Thanksgiving that year, I decided to try my hand at creating a recipe for a nut free pecan pie bar.  The recipe became an immediate hit with our family and was a staple in our farmhouse kitchen during the colder months of the year when fresh berries for pies and crumbles weren’t being harvested from our gardens.

Sadly, Wheat Nuts® were pulled from the market in 2013, leaving us to meter out our remaining supply until it was gone.  We used the last of our stash to make a pan of these bars and then returned to the reality of not being able to enjoy the flavor of nuts in our nut free home.

Since that time, I have received countless messages and comments from nut free families just like ours who were desperate to find Wheat Nuts® again.  We shared in the disappointment of not being able to enjoy their delicious flavor in our homes without worry of cross contamination or allergic reactions.Wheat Nuts and Nadanut

On a morning a few months ago, I received a comment that changed my disappointment into sheer excitement.  Imagine my surprise when I read a message sharing the happy news that the product we loved was back!  Even better, there were several new products to try that were also nut free.

You can order the following varieties which are all manufactured in a 100% nut free facility:

Wheat Nuts®
Nadanut® Salted Pecans
Nadanut® Unsalted Pecans
Nadanut® Salted Cashews
Nadanut® small chopped pecan pieces
Nadanut® medium chopped pecan pieces
Nadanut® small chopped walnut pieces
Nadanut® small chopped pistachio pieces

For the first time in far too many years, we will be enjoying the flavor of pecan pie at our Thanksgiving table.  We couldn’t bear to wait until Thanksgiving dinner to enjoy the flavor that we have missed so much, so a celebratory batch of these completely nut free pecanless pie bars is definitely in order!

Nut Free Pecanless Pie Bars
makes 24 bars

Shortbread Crust
240 grams (2 cups) All-purpose flour
72 grams (6 Tablespoons) brown sugar
6 ounces butter, cubed

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  Line a 13 x 9 inch pan with parchment paper.

Place all ingredients in food processor.  Process using on/off turns until the mixture has just formed small clumps.  Do not over process.  Sprinkle mixture over the bottom of prepared pan.  Lightly press the mixture evenly into the bottom of the pan.  Bake for 20 minutes until light golden brown.  Prepare filling as the crust is baking.

 
Nut Free Pecanless Pie Filling
168 grams (2 cups) Nadanut® medium chopped pecan pieces
144 grams (3/4 cup) brown sugar
4 ounces butter
63 grams (3 Tablespoons) honey
1 ounce (2 Tablespoons) half and half

Melt butter in heavy saucepan over medium heat.  Stir in brown sugar, honey, and half and half.  Bring to a gentle simmer and cook for 1 minute, stirring constantly.  Remove from heat and stir in chopped Wheat Nuts.

When the shortbread crust is finished baking, remove it from the oven and  immediately pour warm filling over the top.  If necessary, spread filling evenly over the crust.  Return pan to the oven and bake for 20 minutes.  Remove from the oven and cool completely.

Run a sharp knife or spatula around the edges of the pan to loosen the cooled bars.  Use the edges of the parchment paper to lift cooled bars from the pan to a cutting board.  Using serrated knife, cut into bars.  Serve warm or at room temperature.

Our family lives and bakes around nut allergies, so our farmhouse kitchen is nut free.  This recipe uses one of our nut free favorites: Nadanut Nut Free Snacks.  You can learn all about them at www.nadanut.com


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

thanksgiving-gallery-ss


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/nut-free-pecanless-pie-bars/

1840 Farmhouse Style Sweet Potatoes Anna

Sweet Potatoes Anna Ingredients at 1840 FarmWhen I was asked to create a recipe to help showcase Castello Cheese to promote their Unlock Your Inner Chef Sweepstakes and the release of the new movie Burnt, I couldn’t wait to head into the farmhouse kitchen and get started. I love blue cheese. In fact, it might be my favorite type of cheese. I also love a good movie, especially if it involves food. Many of my favorite films highlight the ability of food to feed the soul and rebuild the spirit.SweetPotatoAnnaSlices at 1840 Farm

The movie Burnt opened in theaters last week. It tells the tale of a chef played by Bradley Cooper who loses his way while working in Paris. As the movie progresses, his character finds himself and self-redemption in the food that he creates. The food is a worthy co-star in the film, with beautifully crafted dishes appearing on the plate.

The cuisine featured in the film is classical French, so I wanted to create a modern, farmhouse style approach for a recipe that appears in the film. After carefully considering my options, I decided to put my seasonal New England spin on the Pommes Anna with Extra Cream Danish Blue Cheese showcased in the movie.

I first came to know the classic preparation for Pommes Anna through my culinary idol Julia Child. She describes the dish in her epic tome Mastering the Art of French Cooking Volume Two. She introduces the recipe by sharing that it was “created during the era of Napoleon III and named, as were many culinary triumphs in those days, after one of the grande cocotte of the period.” I can almost hear Julia’s trilling voice telling the tale. Legend has it that Pommes (potatoes) Anna was indeed named after a beautiful young woman who visited the palace’s court during the reign of Napoleon III.

SweetPotatoAnnawithBlueCheese at 1840 FarmThe traditional dish is a delicate preparation of waxy potatoes and clarified butter. I wanted to stay true to the spirit of the classic dish while featuring the best of what is in season this time of year. Local white potatoes are available, but I couldn’t help thinking of beautiful sweet potatoes. I had a hunch that I could prepare sweet potatoes in the classic style of Pommes Anna but cooked simply in a cast iron skillet. It seemed like the perfect combination of classic French technique and rustic farmhouse cooking.

The resulting dish is delicious and beautiful. It is full of the earthy flavor of sweet potatoes and accented by the butter and herbs layered between the thin slices. The cast iron skillet provides even heat, producing a beautiful dish that is cooked through yet retains its shape and looks stunning on the plate.

The Castello Cheese Danish Blue Cheese Crumbles sprinkled on top provides the perfect bright accent for the sweet potatoes. The creamy, tangy texture and flavor transform this dish from delicious to spectacular. I hope that you’ll enjoy serving this stunning dish to your friends and family as much as I do. It’s so delicious that it might just make an appearance on our Thanksgiving table this year.

I also hope that you’ll visit Castello’s Burnt campaign page to enter their Unlock Your Inner Chef Sweepstakes. You’ll find a collection of delicious recipes from the film and great prizes including a private cooking class for two and a year’s worth of Castello cheese. I entered and hope that you will too!

 

1840 Farmhouse Style Sweet Potatoes (Pommes) AnnaSweetPotatoAnnaOven at 1840 Farm
Serves 4-6 as a side dish

I like to prepare this recipe in my 12 inch cast iron skillet. It can also be cooked in a large skillet that can withstand the 425 degree heat of the oven. The classic preparation of this dish calls for the potatoes to be peeled, but I prefer to leave the peel on my sweet potatoes. I like to incorporate the beautiful contrast in color and nutritional benefits of the skins into the finished dish. If you prefer, the potatoes can be peeled. The results will be equally delicious.

4 pounds medium sized sweet potatoes
4 Tablespoons butter
2 Tablespoons fresh minced herbs (rosemary, thyme, and sage)
sea salt
pepper
Castello Cheese Danish Blue Cheese crumbles

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Using a sharp knife, carefully slice the sweet potatoes into slices that are approximately 1/8” thick. Mince the fresh herbs and set aside.

Heat the large skillet over medium low heat. Add the butter and cook until completely melted. Remove the skillet from the heat and pour the butter off into a small bowl. Using a heat safe brush, fully coat the bottom and sides of the pan with melted butter to prevent the potatoes from sticking.

Arrange a layer of the sweet potato slices on the bottom of the skillet, overlapping to fully cover the skillet’s surface. Brush the layer with the melted butter before seasoning with a sprinkling of the minced herbs and a bit of salt and pepper. Add a second layer of sweet potato slices to fully cover the first layer. Brush the second layer with melted butter and season with herbs, salt, and pepper. Continue layering until all of the potatoes are used. Brush the top layer with butter and sprinkle the remaining herbs on top. Season with salt and pepper.

SweetPotatoAnnaSkilletStackButter one side of a piece of aluminum foil large enough to fully cover the pan. Place the foil buttered side down on top of the potatoes. Place another slightly smaller oven safe skillet on top of the foil. The weight of the smaller skillet will help to hold the layers of sweet potatoes in place and help the dish to retain its shape as it cooks.

Place the dish in the warm oven and bake for 25 minutes. Remove the dish from the oven. At this point, the top skillet can be removed and the foil can be carefully peeled back using a spatula if necessary to separate it from the top layer of sweet potato slices.

Return the pan to the oven and bake uncovered for 20 to 30 minutes. When finished, the potatoes should be tender yet hold their shape. They will begin to take on a beautiful caramelized color as they finish baking.

Remove the pan from the oven. Cut into wedges and serve topped with a sprinkling of Castello blue cheese. The heat from the sweet potatoes will melt the cheese, creating a beautiful and delicious dish that you’ll be proud to serve at your family table.


This post was sponsored by Castello Cheese.  We’re thrilled to have the opportunity to share new brands and products with our readers.  1840 Farm abides by word of mouth marketing standards. We believe in honesty of relationship, opinion and identity.  Compensation received from sponsors will not influence the topics or posts made on this blog.  Sponsored posts will be clearly labeled as such. Product reviews will include our honest opinions about the product(s) reviewed.  Products that do not meet our standards of daily use on our farm will not be reviewed. Samples of the products that I review (or reimbursements) are sent to me at no expense in order to allow me to use the product and evaluate its performance.  The framework of our review process does not guarantee a positive review in exchange for the product provided.  Our product reviews contain both facts about the product and my personal opinion of its performance while it was used at 1840 Farm.


.

This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

thanksgiving-gallery-ss


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/1840-farmhouse-style-sweet-potatoes-anna/

A Healthy Fall Treat for our Hens – Pumpkin Oatmeal

1840 Farm CoopFall is here. Our landscape is becoming more colorful every day. The foliage has been just glorious this year, the most beautiful I have seen in several years. Each day, I am astounded by the intense colors Mother Nature has treated us to this year.  Even the hens are enjoying a more colorful backdrop as the beautiful red maple leaves collect around their coop and run.

Now that fall has enveloped our farm, it is time to admit that we all know what is coming next: the long New England winter. A cold, snowy winter is to be expected here in New England. It simply goes with the geography. We don’t have to love the thought of months on end spent shoveling snow, watching the sun go down before 4:00 pm, and battling the perils of a drafty farmhouse built a full two decades before Abraham Lincoln became President. No, we don’t have to love it, but it’s coming and we might as well prepare ourselves to endure it in gritty New England fashion.

Long Island Cheese Heirloom Squash at 1840 FarmAs we ready the farm and its animals for winter weather, the meals served at our farmhouse table begin to celebrate the best of what is available during the season when our gardens are at rest. We begin to utilize the food we have put up in the pantry and freezer, pairing it with locally raised meat and produce from our favorite farms. The cast iron skillets go in the heavy rotation and tall pots of homemade chili and soup become a common sight.

One of those warm, comforting meals is our Smoky Black Bean Chili with Butternut Squash. It’s full of the deep flavors of chilies, tomatoes, and coffee from the fresh chili paste that flavors the bubbling pot. It has an intoxicating aroma which always brings my family to the kitchen to ask if their nose has correctly informed them of the meal that will grace that evening’s dinner table.

Our heritage breed hens are equally enthusiastic about my fall menu Pumpkin Seeds at 1840 Farmplanning. When squash and pumpkin are featured on our dinner table, the hens are treated to the pulp and seeds for days to come. On warmer days, I serve the seeds as is and the girls gobble them quickly. On brisk mornings, I often mix a hearty amount of the seeds and pulp into a bowl of warm oatmeal for them. On a cold morning, a steaming bowl of oatmeal is a welcome treat and doesn’t last more than a few minutes.

As a chicken keeper, I can’t help but love finding a healthy treat for our chickens that they love to eat and makes use of kitchen scraps. Not only do our girls love the flavor of the squash or pumpkin seeds and pulp, they deliver amazing nutritional and health benefits with every bite. Seeds from cucurbits are delicious and hold the incredible power of helping our hens to fight off internal parasites.

While you’re carving up Halloween Jack O’Lanterns and serving up squash and pumpkins to your family, save the seeds and pulp for your flock. They’ll be happy to enjoy their healthy treat and reward you with good health and fresh eggs.

You can learn more about the health benefits of feeding your flock pumpkin and squash along with other natural chicken and duck keeping strategies from our friends at Fresh Eggs Daily. While you’re reading, I’ll be carving up a Halloween Jack O’Lantern for the front porch, putting on a pot of chili, and taking out a bowl of nutritious pumpkin seeds to our girls!

Butternut Squash/Pumpkin Oatmeal for the Hens at 1840 Farm
This recipe is a great place to use the remaining butternut squash or pumpkin from your favorite fall recipes. Remember to include the seeds and you’ll find that only the peel will be making its way to your compost pile.

4 – 6 ounces winter squash or pumpkin, peeled and cubed (seeds included)
16 ounces water
2 1/4 cups old-fashioned oats
2 ounces yogurt or kefir

Place butternut squash and seeds in a large microwave-safe bowl with the water. Select a large bowl as the oatmeal will expand greatly as it cooks. Microwave on high for 4 minutes.

Carefully remove the bowl from the microwave and add the oats, stirring to combine. Return bowl to microwave and cook on high for an additional 5 minutes.

Remove bowl from the microwave. Add yogurt or kefir and stir to combine. Allow to cool slightly and serve to the lucky residents of your coop.

 


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!

 


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/10/a-healthy-fall-treat-for-our-hens-pumpkin-oatmeal/

Next page »

« Previous page