Savory Husk Cherry and Rosemary Jam Branded

    Husk Cherries (Physalis pruinosa) are related to the tomatillo and tomato.  They share the same scientific family with tomatoes and the same genus as the tomatillo.  The marble shaped fruits are sweet and earthy with a tropical note.  Their flavor defies easy explanation.  Each bite is equal partsRead More →

West Indian Heirloom Gherkin at 1840 Farm

West Indian Burr Gherkin Cucumis anguria Planting Depth: 1″ below the soil’s surface Plant Spacing: 12 inch hills containing 6-8 seeds each Row Spacing:  18-24 inches Days to Maturity:  60-65 The West Indian Burr Gherkin is a native of Africa.  It is believed that it was brought to the CaribbeanRead More →

Freezing Tomatoes at 1840 Farm

I love heirloom tomato season.  When our garden is producing ripe tomatoes, we enjoy them at almost every meal.  We also put them up for the long New England winter that lies ahead.  We have found that cherry tomatoes are ideally suited for long-term storage in the freezer. I knowRead More →

1840 Farm Flag

I grew up celebrating Independence Day with sparklers and barbecue. We lived in Kansas and didn’t really need the guise of a holiday as an excuse to eat barbecue. Fourth of July parades and celebrations seemed to be as ubiquitous as sunshine on a summer day during those years. ThereRead More →

Refrigerator Dilly Beans at 1840 Farm

For the past several years, I have been making refrigerator dill pickles using the cucumbers we harvest fresh from our garden. Making those simple, fresh pickles is a great way of pickling cucumbers without needing to spend hours standing over the canning pot.  In minutes, I can prepare several masonRead More →

I am proud to introduce you to 1840 Farm’s newest sponsor:  Mike the Gardener’s Seeds of the Month Club.  The Seeds of the Month Club offers a unique opportunity to receive a collection of open pollinated, heirloom, non-GMO seed varieties delivered to your mailbox each month.  Their club offers seasonedRead More →

The 1840 Farm Pollinators Garden

French Marigolds have a centuries old secret:  they aren’t really French.  It is believed that they made their way to France in the 1500s.  An illustration of a striped French Marigold appeared as early as a 1791 edition of Curtis’ Botanical Magazine.  This marigold was described as being yellow withRead More →

The Easy Keepers Garden Heirloom Seed Collection

We have been growing heirlooms here at 1840 Farm since 2006.  Every summer, we embark on a challenge that lasts through the entire growing season:  we try to grow heirloom tomatoes from seed.  For added fun, we add in a geography component to the challenge. Here in New England, weRead More →

Tennis Ball Heirloom Lettuce at 1840 Farm

Tennis Ball Lettuce was found in the United States as early as the eighteenth century.  It was a favorite of Thomas Jefferson.  He grew it in the famed garden at Monticello beginning in 1809.  When describing Tennis Ball, he wrote, “it does not require so much care and attention” asRead More →

French Breakfast Heirloom Radishes at 1840 Farm

Here at 1840 Farm, we eagerly await radish season each spring.  Radishes are the first vegetable crop harvested from our garden and announce the happy arrival of the growing season.  They also enable us to enjoy eating a spring menu favorite:  sliced radish tartine. French Breakfast Heirloom Radishes are alwaysRead More →

Kale at 1840 Farm

Each year, it seems that a particular food takes center stage.  Suddenly, it appears in the food sections of popular magazines, on the menus of my favorite restaurants, and in the cookbook section of our local bookstore.  For the past year or so, that food has been kale.  Everywhere IRead More →