Category Archive: Main Courses

An 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Celebration

Fall at 1840 Farm

For me, Thanksgiving is a holiday marked by time spent with family gathered around the table and the delicious tastes of our favorite holiday dishes. I have fond childhood memories of Thanksgiving meals prepared by my paternal grandmother and a team of aunts and uncles. The food was delicious and comforting and the conversation was lively. There was laughter and joy at that table and the meal always ended with my grandmother’s homemade pies.

It’s really no wonder that Thanksgiving traditions have remained so strong over the years. A day that combines family, friends, and comforting homemade food is a holiday to cherish. In many ways, our annual celebration is much like the original harvest celebration that took place 400 years ago, a celebration of all that we are grateful for in our daily lives and the marking of the end of another year’s homegrown harvest of fresh food from our gardens.

The Thanksgiving meal has evolved significantly over the years, but its importance has not diminished.  The first feast would have probably featured wild fowl instead of our modern-day turkey. History tells us that there would not have been cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, or pumpkin pie at that first celebration.  When they sat down to enjoy their meal, the settler’s sugar stores had been depleted, the potato had not yet made its way to North America, and using butter and flour to make a pie crust was a luxury far beyond their wildest imagination.ThanksgivingSquashDecor

Instead, their celebration would have revolved around food that was seasonal,  rustic, simple, and local.  Most likely, it would have featured venison and seafood that had been hunted and caught by the men of the group along with corn, beans, and squash from the land that they had tended during the growing season.  The celebration took place over a series of days instead of at a single meal.

By the mid-1800s, sage dressing and mashed potatoes had begun to take their place on a traditional Thanksgiving table.  In 1863, Abraham Lincoln made Thanksgiving a national holiday.  Since then, we have been marking the day and celebrating with our favorite dishes.

Three generations of my family will gather around our farmhouse table for our Thanksgiving meal in a house that was built at a time before Thanksgiving was declared a national holiday.  I will inevitably turn my thoughts towards all that I am thankful for.  The list is too long to mention, but family, friends, and our life here on the farm are all at the top of my list.

I am also thankful for you, Dear Reader.  You have inspired me to continue telling my family’s story and have returned the favor by sharing yours.  I have enjoyed learning about your farms and families as much as I have enjoyed sharing news from mine.  So, on this holiday that celebrates family, friends, and food enjoyed together, I wish you a day overflowing with all three.  I hope that you have a holiday filled to the brim with laughter, memories in the making, and those nearest and dearest to you.

 

 


Here’s a peek at a few of the recipes that will be found on our Thanksgiving table.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

You can click on any of the photos to visit the original post so that you can add them to your celebration.

 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/1840farm_thanksgiving/

Heirloom Tomato Pie

Heirloom Tomato Pie at 1840 FarmIf I ranked my favorite foods, heirloom tomatoes and homemade pie would both be at the top of my list.  In fact, they might occupy the first and second spot.  Please don’t ask me to choose one of them as my absolute favorite because I’m not sure that I could.

Thanks to this recipe, I can combine my love of the two and serve a delicious dinner at our family table.  Heirloom Tomato Pie is a family favorite when we are harvesting ripe heirloom tomatoes from our garden every day.  It combines the delicious flavors of heirloom tomatoes with the richness of buttery pie crust.  It also beautifully pairs the soft texture of the ripe fruit with flaky pie crust.  One bite and you’ll understand why we love it so much!

 

Heirloom Tomato Pie
Serves 4 to 6

If you have a favorite pie crust recipe, it can be put to good use in this recipe.  I like to make a slightly savory crust by adding my favorite olive oils from the Fresh-Pressed Olive Oil Club instead of the ice water usually called for in a pie crust recipe.  The resulting pie crust is flaky and delicious, filled with the earthy flavor of great olive oil. You can read my favorite pie crust tips to create a delicious pie crust every single time.

The pie crust in this recipe should be blind baked, or prebaked before the filling is added.  Because the tomato filling is so juicy, adding it to an unbaked pie crust would result in a soggy crust.  By blind baking the crust and topping it with a bit of grated cheese, the crust will develop into a flaky base for the unctuous filling.Heirloom Tomato Pie Crust at 1840 Farm

1 1/2 pounds ripe heirloom tomatoes
2 cups (240 grams) All-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
8 Tablespoons (4 ounces) butter, grated
4 Tablespoons (2 ounces) extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 onion, minced
2 Tablespoons basil, chopped
2 ounces mozzarella cheese, grated
2 ounces smoked mozzarella cheese, grated
8 ounces ricotta cheese
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 eggs
Balsamic glaze for serving, if desired

Slice the tomatoes into 1″ thick rounds.  Place them in a colander to drain as you prepare the crust.  Allowing some of the excess liquid to drain away will help to concentrate the tomato flavor and yield a rich, thick filling.

To make the crust, place the flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor.  Pulse the dry ingredients to combine.  Add the grated butter and pulse until the butter has begun to incorporate into the flour and resembles small grains of rice.

With the motor running, add the olive oil one Tablespoon at a time until the dough forms a ball.  Take care not to over process the dough.  Over processing will help to develop the gluten in the flour and lead to a crust that is chewy and tough.  Less is more when it comes to working pie crust and will result in a flaky, light crust.

Transfer the pie crust dough to a pie plate.  Using your fingers, press the dough into shape gently until it is a uniform thickness and completely covers the bottom and sides of the pie plate. Flute or decorate the top edge if desired and transfer the pie plate to the refrigerator to chill while the oven warms.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit.  Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil to catch any pie filling that may bubble over during baking.  When the oven has come up to temperature, remove the pie plate from the refrigerator and place on the baking sheet. Line the plate with a sheet of aluminum foil, pressing very gently to settle it into the edges of the crust.  Add dried beans, rice, or ceramic pie weights to weigh down the crust as it bakes.

Place the pie plate on the lined baking sheet before transferring to the hot oven. Blind bake for 15-20 minutes, until the crust begins to set up but before it begins to brown. Remove the crust from the oven.  Carefully remove the foil and beans, rice, or weights.  These items will be extremely hot, so take care when removing them. After the weights have cooled, they can be stored and used over and over again.

Heirloom Tomato Pie FillingReduce the oven temperature to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.  Sprinkle half of the grated Parmesan cheese over the bottom of the blind baked pie crust.  Allow the crust to cool as you prepare the filling.

In a small skillet over medium heat, sauté the onion in a teaspoon of olive oil until translucent, approximately 5-8 minutes.  Stir frequently to prevent the onion from burning.  Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.

In a large bowl, create the filling.  Combine the mozzarella cheese, smoked mozzarella, ricotta, mayonnaise, and eggs.  Stir until smooth.  Season with salt and pepper.

Arrange the sliced tomatoes to cover the bottom of the pie crust.  Spread the sautéed onions over the tomatoes and sprinkle the basil on top.  Season with salt and pepper.  Transfer the filling to the pie, spreading gently to completely cover the tomatoes.  Sprinkle the remaining Parmesan cheese on top.

Transfer the pie to the 400 degree oven.  Bake until the filling is lightly set in the middle and bubbly and browned on top, approximately 30 minutes.  If the filling sets before it has browned sufficiently on top, simply broil the pie for a brief few minutes.  Remove from the oven and allow to cool for 5-10 minutes before slicing and serving.


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Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/09/heirloom-tomato-pie/

Cast Iron Skillet Pork and Potato Hash

Cast Iron Skillet Pork and Potato HashWhen we sit down at our farmhouse table to enjoy a meal featuring Beer and Brown Sugar Braised Pork, I can count on someone to ask if there will be enough pork to make Cast Iron Skillet Pork and Potato Hash for dinner the following evening. I have come to expect that question, so I always buy a cut of pork that is large enough to ensure that there will be plenty of pork to make this hash.

Leftovers often get a bad rap, but this preparation can change that with the first bite. This hash is a star main dish in its own right. It is delicious, comforting, and full of flavor. Leftovers never had it so good.

This is one of those recipes that welcomes interpretation and substitution. You can add other vegetables to the mix or substitute another cut of meat you have on hand. No matter the ingredients, the results are always delicious.

Hash

 

 

 

 

Cast Iron Skillet Pork and Potato Hash

This recipe makes use of one of my favorite pans: a cast iron skillet. I like to use my Lodge 12 inch cast iron skillet when preparing this hash. If your skillet is smaller, you can reduce the proportions to fit your pan. I love to use the reserved cooking liquid from the Beer and Brown Sugar Braised Pork Roast, but an equal amount of bone broth or a good quality stock can be used.

1 Tablespoon butter
1 large onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 ½ pounds potatoes, washed and cut into ½ inch cubes
¼ teaspoon dried thyme
12 ounces reserved cooking liquid from Beer and Brown Sugar Braised Pork or bone broth
8 ounces shredded pork
2 ounces heavy cream
salt and pepper to taste
2 ounces smoked cheddar, grated

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Position an oven rack in the middle of the oven.

Heat a large cast iron skillet over medium high heat. Add the butter to the hot pan and swirl to coat the bottom surface. Add the onion and cook until almost translucent, about five minutes. Add the garlic and cook one minute before adding the potatoes to the pan, stirring to combine.

Add the thyme and reserved cooking liquid or bone broth to the pan. Bring the liquid to a simmer. Cover the pan and reduce the heat to low. Cook for 10 minutes undisturbed.

Remove the cover and stir the mixture. The potatoes should have begun to soften and absorbed some of the liquid. Add the pork and heavy cream to the pan and stir to combine. Taste for seasoning, adding salt and pepper to taste. Press the mixture firmly into the pan and top with the grated cheddar. Transfer the skillet to the warm oven.

Cook the hash for ten minutes. Check the potatoes for doneness before turning on the broiler. Broil for two minutes to brown the top surface of the hash. Remove from the oven and serve hot.  We like to serve this hash with a side of Classic Sauerkraut.

 

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Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/04/cast-iron-skillet-pork-and-potato-hash/

Warm Chickpea Salad


Photo Dec 16, 1 13 49 PMPhoto Dec 16, 1 13 27 PMDuring the busy holiday season, I find myself looking for recipes that are simple to prepare for our family table.  I find that this time of year is all about finding time to spend together and creating holiday memories that will last a lifetime.

While I may be short on time during the last month of the year, I still want to serve something full of comfort, flavor, and nourishment to my family. Creating a dish using pantry and refrigerator staples makes that a much simpler task.  It also allows me to spend more time with my family whether we’re gathered at the dinner table or finding ways to celebrate the season together.

When Mezzetta invited me to share a recipe using their products with the members of The 1840 Farm Community, I was thrilled.  We love their products and keep a supply of them in our pantry all year long.  I love to add them to recipes or serve them as part of our afternoon cheese course.

Warm Chickpea Salad is just that type of dish. It is delicious, full of flavor, and simple to prepare. It can be served as a main course with pita bread or chips and a green salad or as a side dish paired perfectly with grilled meats or a burger.  This warm salad is also perfect for entertaining and serving with appetizers or a cheese course.  When entertaining, I prepare a double batch and serve the remaining kalamata olives and Giardiniera to accompany the other nibbles we’ve prepared for our guests.

These ingredients work so well together that you can adjust the quantities to suit your taste or make use of what you happen to have on hand. I love the combination of the earthy chickpeas and hummus with the briny kalamata olives, smoky sweet roasted bell peppers, and the brightness of the crunchy cauliflower, carrots, and celery from the Giardiniera. Together, they combine to make a delicious dish that my family is happy to see during the holiday season and beyond!

Mezzetta Favorites Holiday Gift Basket

If you’d like to try Mezzetta products, then you’ll want to be sure to enter Mezzetta’s Daily Holiday Gift Basket Giveaway is going on now. They’re generously giving away a fabulous prize package each day during the month of December. To enter, visit Mezzetta and share one of your favorite holiday memories. Each day a winner will be selected at random. Prizes will be shipped within 2 weeks.

Mezzetta Favorites Holiday Gift Basket  includes:

  • 100% Italian Estate Grown Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Golden Greek Peperoncini
  • Garlic Stuffed Olives
  • Castelvetrano Olives
  • Pitted Greek Kalamata Olives
  • Roasted Marinated Red & Yellow Sweet Bell Peppers
  • Cocktail Onions
  • 1 Apron (from House Party contents)
  • 1 Metal Olive Spoon (from House Party contents)
  • 1 Tote Bag (from House Party contents)
  • 1 Ceramic Bowl

Warm Chickpea SaladWarm Chickpea Salad with Hummus at 1840 Farm

This recipe can be made using canned chickpeas or dried chickpeas that have been fully cooked. When using dried chickpeas, I like to cook them in the oven. Bring a large pot of water to boil in an oven safe pot with a lid. Boil the water on the stove top for five minutes before covering and transferring to a preheated 350 degree Fahrenheit oven. Allow the chickpeas to cook until tender. The length of cooking time will vary slightly due to oven temperature and the age of the dried beans. I check the chickpeas after 60, 90, and 120 minutes, removing them from the oven when they are nearly tender. I allow the covered pot to sit on the stove top and cool to room temperature before using in any recipe that calls for chickpeas.

1 Tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced (or ½ teaspoon dried)
2 cups chickpeas, rinsed and drained
2 Mezzetta Roasted Bell Pepper halves, diced
12 Mezzetta Pitted Greek Kalamata Olives, halved
2 Tablespoons hummus
¼ cup Mezzetta Italian Mix Giardiniera, cut into bite sized pieces
salt and pepper to taste
balsamic glaze to garnish
warm pita bread

Warm a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the olive oil, swirling to coat the bottom surface of the pan. Add the garlic and rosemary and cook until fragrant, approximately one minute. Add the chickpeas and cook for until warm, stirring to prevent sticking, approximately 4 minutes. Add the bell peppers, olives, and hummus, stirring to warm the hummus and coat all of the ingredients.

Remove the pan from the heat. Stir in the Giardiniera and season with salt and pepper to taste. Drizzle with a bit of balsamic glaze and serve with toasted triangles of pita bread.

Mezzetta is offering a downloadable $.50 off coupon on any Mezzetta products. The coupon is located here and is available from December 1st through December 31st.

 

 


This recipe was sponsored by Mezzetta.  We’re thrilled to have the opportunity to share one of our favorite brands with our readers.  1840 Farm abides by word of mouth marketing standards. We believe in honesty of relationship, opinion and identity.  Compensation received from sponsors will not influence the topics or posts made on this blog.  Sponsored posts will be clearly labeled as such. Product reviews will include our honest opinions about the product(s) reviewed.  Products that do not meet our standards of daily use on our farm will not be reviewed. Samples of the products that I review are sent to me at no expense in order to allow me to use the product and evaluate its performance.  The framework of our review process does not guarantee a positive review in exchange for the product provided.  Our product reviews contain both facts about the product and my personal opinion of its performance while it was used at 1840 Farm.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2014/12/warm-chickpea-salad/

Strawberry Puff Pancake

Strawberry Puff Pancake at 1840 FarmI have many fond memories of this dish from my childhood.  My mother made this recipe for countless holiday morning breakfasts.  It was always topped with fresh strawberries, sour cream, and a sprinkling of brown sugar.  It was always called Strawberry Puff Pancake.

The name made sense given that the dish was topped with strawberries and the batter puffed dramatically while it baked in the oven.  It seemed magical to me that you could pour a thin batter into the pie plate, slide it in the oven and watch as it transformed into an airy, delicate concoction.

For a chicken keeper, this is a delicious celebration of the fresh eggs that we collect from our heritage breed hens.  The resulting pancake is full of the fresh, rich flavor of fresh eggs.  The flavor is paired with the beautiful golden color of the yolks provided by hens that enjoy sunshine, fresh air, and plenty of fresh green grass and treats.

I know now that this dish bears a remarkable resemblance to the German Dutch Baby or Dutch Pancake.  No matter its name, the recipe is similar to a popover and yields a light, eggy, custard-like pancake that is delicious when topped with fresh fruit. While the combination of sour cream and brown sugar with the fresh strawberries may seem curious at first, I promise that it won’t disappoint.  We have tried topping this pancake with whipped cream and syrup, but this is our favorite trio of toppings.

This is a family favorite here at 1840 Farm and sure to become one around your family table.  I hope that you’ll enjoy it just as much as we do!

Strawberry Puff Pancake (German Dutch Baby)
Print
Ingredients
  1. 3 Tablespoons (1 ½ ounces) butter
  2. 3 large eggs
  3. 1 ½ cups (12 ounces) whole milk
  4. 6 Tablespoons (72 grams) granulated sugar
  5. ¾ cup (90 grams) All-purpose flour
  6. ¼ teaspoon salt
For Serving
  1. strawberries
  2. brown sugar
  3. sour cream
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Place the butter in a glass pie pan, 9 inch cast iron skillet, or similarly sized casserole dish and transfer to the warm oven as you prepare the batter. I like to place the baking dish or skillet on top of a cookie sheet to catch any excess batter that might overflow the pan as it bakes.
  2. In a large bowl, beat the eggs using a whisk until they are light and frothy. Add the milk and whisk until well combined. Add the sugar, flour, and salt and whisk until the mixture is completely smooth.
  3. Remove the warm baking dish from the oven. Pour the batter into the pan and return it to the oven. Bake for 25-30 minutes or until the edges are puffed and lightly brown. When the pancake is fully baked, a sharp knife inserted into the middle of the pan will come out clean.
  4. Remove the pancake from the oven and serve topped with a sprinkling of brown sugar, fresh sliced strawberries, and a dollop of sour cream. Enjoy!
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Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2014/04/strawberry-puff-pancake-recipe/

Cast Iron Skillet Cinnamon Rolls with Bourbon Caramel Sauce

A few months ago, I was given the opportunity to review the new cookbook, Put An Egg On It by Lara Ferroni.  It was filled with fantastic recipes featuring one of my favorite foods:  eggs.  I loved it so much that I was thrilled to be presented with the chance to review a second cookbook from the Sasquatch Books catalog.  I was even more excited when I learned that it was a cookbook that focused on the use of one of my favorite tools in the kitchen:  a cast iron pan.

The Cast Iron Skillet Cookbook by Sharon Kramis and Julie Kramis Hearne contains over 90 recipes that all utilize a cast iron skillet.  These recipes represent the full range of dishes from breakfast fare to hearty dishes to serve at your family’s dinner table.  This beautiful book also includes helpful information to guide readers through the process of selecting a cast iron skillet, seasoning its surface, and caring for it properly.

The recipe featured on the cover caught my attention right away.  The pecan sticky buns looked amazing in the pan and on the plate.  I couldn’t wait to open the cover and read the recipe.  After I had read that recipe, I continued on through the entrees, vegetables and sides, and delectable looking desserts.

All of the recipes looked delicious, but I was drawn to the idea of making my family’s favorite cinnamon rolls in our own cast iron skillet before diving in and trying a new recipe.  I wondered if using my favorite pan would make any difference in the cinnamon rolls I was planning to serve for dinner.

After the first bite, my family proclaimed that these were the most delicious cinnamon rolls that I had ever made.  As dinner went on, so did their happy comments.  By the time the last bite had been enjoyed, they were all inquiring about when I would be making these Cast Iron Skillet Cinnamon Rolls with Bourbon Caramel Sauce again.

I promised that I would make this recipe again soon.  I want to share the recipe with you first so that you can make them yourself.  These cinnamon rolls are delicious and sure to delight your friends and family.

 

Cast Iron Skillet Cinnamon Rolls with Bourbon Caramel Sauce
serves 4-6

I like to use our WonderMill to mill our own organic, non-GMO flour for this recipe, but there’s no need to pass up making these rolls if you don’t have the ability to mill your own flour. You can substitute high quality whole wheat flour or All-purpose flour. 

I find that adding Grandma Eloise’s Dough Enhancer helps to create lighter dough and improve the overall texture of the rolls.  If you don’t have it on hand, you can simply omit it from the recipe.  The resulting recipe will still be absolutely delicious. You can learn more about the dough enhancer in my recipe for our Farmhouse Country Loaf.

Dough
¼ cup (2 ounces) warm water
1 Tablespoon (20 grams) molasses
1 package (2 ½ teaspoons) active dry yeast
¼ cup (2 ounces) warm milk
2 large eggs, room temperature
1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
2 cups (240 grams) All-purpose flour
1 cup (120 grams) whole wheat flour
½ teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons Grandma Eloise’s Dough Enhancer
4 Tablespoons (2 ounces) butter, cut into small cubes

Bourbon Caramel Sauce
½ cup (96 grams) brown sugar
4 Tablespoons (2 ounces) butter
1 Tablespoon honey
1 Tablespoon maple syrup
1 Tablespoon bourbon

Filling
4 Tablespoons (2 ounces) butter, softened
¼ cup (48 grams) granulated sugar
¼ cup (48 grams) brown sugar
2 Tablespoons ground cinnamon

If you are using a dough proofer, preheat the proofer following the manufacturer’s instructions as you prepare the dough.  If you don’t have a proofer, you can provide the dough with a warm, draft free location to rise.  Additional time may be necessary for the dough to rise sufficiently, but the cinnamon rolls will taste equally delicious.

In a large bowl, combine the warm water and molasses, stirring to dissolve the molasses.  Sprinkle the yeast over the mixture and set aside to bloom as you measure the dry ingredients, approximately five minutes.

Measure and combine the flour, dough enhancer, and salt in a bowl.  Use a whisk to mix the dry ingredients and evenly distribute the salt throughout the flour.

When the five minutes have elapsed, whisk the liquid ingredients and then add the warm milk, eggs, and vanilla.  Whisk until the eggs are incorporated and the mixture is smooth.

Add the dry ingredients in one addition to the yeast mixture.  Use a dough hook on a stand mixer or a wooden spoon, mix until a shaggy dough forms.  If you are using a stand mixer, continue to mix the dough on the lowest setting for 5 minutes or until a smooth, elastic dough forms before beginning to add the butter slowly.  Add the butter a piece at a time, allowing the mixer to work the dough between each addition.  Continue to mix until all of the butter is incorporated into the dough.

Transfer the dough to a large bowl that has been brushed with butter or oil.  Place the dough in the warm proofer or a draft free spot to rest and rise for approximately 60 minutes.  Remove the dough from the bowl and knead lightly before returning the dough to the bowl to rise for another 60 minutes or until doubled in size.

As the dough is rising for a second time, prepare the bourbon caramel sauce.  Add the brown sugar, butter, honey, maple syrup, and bourbon to an 8 inch or 10 inch cast iron skillet.  Place the skillet over medium high heat.  Bring the mixture to a boil without stirring.  Reduce the heat to medium and continue to simmer until the mixture thickens slightly, approximately five minutes.  Remove the skillet from the heat and allow the caramel to cool to room temperature.

In a small bowl, combine the sugar, brown sugar, and cinnamon for the filling.  Ideally, the butter should be soft enough to spread across the dough easily without stretching the dough.  If it needs a bit of encouragement, a fork can be used to mash it onto a plate before rolling out the dough.

When the dough has risen sufficiently, transfer it to a floured surface.  Lightly flour the surface of the dough before using a rolling pin to roll it into a rectangle approximately 18 by 12 inches in size.

Using a pastry brush or your hands, brush away any excess flour from the surface of the dough.  Spread the softened butter evenly over the dough before sprinkling the cinnamon sugar mixture on top of the butter.  Begin rolling the dough from one long side of the rectangle to the other, forming a tight tube and brushing away excess flour as you roll.

Using a sharp knife, cut the rolled dough into rolls approximately 1 ½ inches in width.  Gently transfer the individual rolls to the cast iron skillet, placing each one cut side down on top of the bourbon caramel sauce.  Continue until all of the rolls are evenly spaced within the skillet.

Place the skillet in preheated bread proofer or a warm, draft free location to rise for another 30-60 minutes or until the rolls have expanded to fill the pan.  As the rolls rise, preheat the oven to 350 degrees.

Transfer the skillet to the preheated oven.  Bake the rolls for 20-30 minutes, until lightly browned and slightly firm.  Remove the skillet from the oven and allow to cool for at least five minutes.  Using oven mitts and a healthy dose of caution, carefully cover the skillet with a larger plate or pan and turn the skillet to release the cinnamon rolls.

Remove the cast iron skillet, scraping any caramel from the pan.  The bourbon caramel sauce will now be on the top surface of the rolls.  Serve the rolls while still warm and enjoy every last bite!

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2014/01/cast-iron-skillet-cinnamon-rolls-with-bourbon-caramel-sauce/

Oven Roasted Heirloom Tomato Spaghetti

Oven Roasted Heirloom Tomato Spaghetti BrandedThis recipe hails from RIalto restaurant in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  I happened upon it by way of The Tomato Festival Cookbook.  For an heirloom tomato lover like me, this cookbook is filled with delicious possibilities.  It includes everything imaginable from cold salads to chocolate cakes that incorporate green tomatoes that simply won’t have enough time to ripen on the vine.

While we enjoy many recipes from or inspired by this cookbook, Chef Jody Adams’ recipe for roasted spaghetti is our absolute favorite.  The dish has a wonderfully rich flavor that we look forward to all year long.  The tomatoes take on a sweet earthiness after their time roasting in the oven which pairs perfectly with the arugula, onion, and basil.  This dish is also beautiful, a real showstopper.

I love to tinker with recipes, adding a little of this or taking away a little of that.  I am especially prone to doing so with pasta recipes, making alterations that tailor the finished dish to my family’s taste.  This dish is so perfect that I have made very few changes.  I didn’t need to.  It’s perfectly delicious just the way it is written and sure to impress and delight everyone gathered around your table at dinnertime.

Oven Roasted Heirloom Tomato Spaghetti
Serves 4
I have made very few changes to the original recipe. I find that our homegrown heirloom tomatoes don’t need the sugar called for in the original recipe, but you can certainly add it to your tomatoes if you feel that they could use a little hint of sweetness. I have also found that I can roast the tomatoes at a higher temperature than called for, reducing the cooking time by more than half with the same results. After a long day of working on the farm, I opt for getting dinner on the table in an hour instead of the three that the original recipe promises.
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 ounces olive oil
  2. 1 large onion, chopped
  3. 4 cloves garlic, minced
  4. 16 – 20 basil leaves, torn or roughly chopped
  5. 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  6. 2 pounds ripe cherry tomatoes, rinsed and dried
  7. 2 ounces olive oil
  8. 2 teaspoons Sugar (optional)
  9. sea salt
  10. 1 pound spaghetti
  11. 2 cups (3.5 ounces) arugula
  12. Parmesan cheese
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Heat two ounces (1/4 cup) of olive oil in a small saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, for five minutes. Add the garlic and cook for one minute or until fragrant. Remove from heat and add the basil leaves and red pepper flakes.
  2. Add the cherry tomatoes to an oven safe casserole dish that can hold them in a single layer. If you are using the sugar, add two teaspoons and toss the tomatoes to coat. Using a large spoon, transfer the onion olive oil mixture to the dish, placing on top of the tomatoes. Sprinkle generously with salt. Gently add the remaining 2 ounces (1/4 cup) olive oil to the sides and transfer the pan to the warm oven. Roast until the tomatoes have softened and the skins are slightly charred, approximately 45 – 60 minutes.
  3. Near the end of the roasting time, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add a generous teaspoon of salt to the water and return to a rapid boil. Add the spaghetti to the pot and cook until al dente according to the package instructions.
  4. Remove the tomatoes from the oven. Add the cooked pasta and arugula to the tomatoes and toss to fully combine and coat the spaghetti with the tomato infused olive oil. Serve immediately garnished with Parmesan cheese.
Adapted from Adapted from Spaghetti with Slow Roasted Tomatoes, Basil, and Parmesan Cheese in The Tomato Festival Cookbook
Adapted from Adapted from Spaghetti with Slow Roasted Tomatoes, Basil, and Parmesan Cheese in The Tomato Festival Cookbook
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Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/oven-roasted-heirloom-tomato-spaghetti/

Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta Pasta

When it comes to simple summer dinners, this recipe is as good as it gets.  In the time it takes for the water to come to a boil, I can have the entire recipe prepped and ready to cook.  By the time the pasta is perfectly cooked, the sauce is ready and dinner is served.

The inspiration for this pasta dish came from another summer favorite:  Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta with Basil.  We love to celebrate our beloved heirloom tomato season with fresh bruschetta on a warm summer afternoon.  So, why not prepare the rustic bruschetta topping and serve it with pasta instead of the traditional crusty loaf of bread?

The results are equally delicious.  It’s nice to have more than one way to celebrate the long-awaited arrival of heirloom tomato season.  It’s also nice to be able to serve a delicious, fresh dinner at our family table in less than 30 minutes from start to finish!

Heirloom Tomato Bruschetta Pasta
Serves 4 as a main course

1 pound heirloom tomatoes, cut into chunks
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 ounce sun-dried tomatoes packed in oil
1 Tablespoon oil from sun-dried tomatoes
1 Tablespoon  extra virgin olive oil
4 ounces mozzarella, cut into cubes
2 ounces smoked mozzarella, cut into cubes
12 ounces penne pasta
1 handful basil leaves, torn
salt and pepper to taste
Balsamic Vinegar Glaze

Bring a large pot of water to a roiling boil.  Add 1 Tablespoon of salt to the water and return to boil.  Add pasta and cook until al dente.

Meanwhile, combine the oil from the jar of sun-dried tomatoes with the olive oil and minced garlic in a large skillet.  Warm gently over low heat until the garlic is fragrant.  Roughly chop or julienne the sun-dried tomatoes before adding them to the warm oil.  Add the fresh tomatoes to the skillet and warm over low heat.

Add the cooked pasta to the skillet and toss to coat.  If the pan is dry, add water from the pasta pot to moisten.  Remove from the heat and add the basil and mozzarella.  Gently stir the mixture.  Taste for seasoning and add more salt or pepper if needed. Serve warm garnished with balsamic vinegar glaze.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/heirloom-tomato-bruschetta-pasta/

Slow Roasted Cherry Tomato Sauce

During the height of heirloom tomato season, we harvest several pounds of cherry tomatoes every day.  It’s intentional:  we plant two dozen cherry tomato plants every summer in our garden.  We have found that they store amazingly well in the freezer, allowing us to make this fresh sauce all winter long.  When the snow is flying outside, a pot of this sauce bubbling on the stove is a wonderful way to remind ourselves that summer will indeed come again.

At 1840 Farm, we enjoy this rich sauce served on fresh polenta made from cornmeal we grind ourselves.  It is also delicious tossed with spaghetti or served with pasta and meatballs. The flavor is rich and earthy with just the right amount of acidity and natural sweetness.

To freeze cherry tomatoes, simply wash them and allow them to dry fully on a clean kitchen towel.  Line a baking sheet or pan that fits into your freezer with freezer paper or parchment.  Place the tomatoes on the pan and place in the freezer.  Allow the tomatoes to freeze solid overnight before transferring to a freezer bag.  Don’t be concerned if the skins rupture as they freeze.  The tomatoes will still store incredibly well and produce a delicious sauce.

Slow Roasted Cherry Tomato Sauce

We love to use our favorite heirloom cherry tomato, the Black Cherry, in this recipe.  You can substitute your favorite cherry or grape tomato variety with equally delicious results.

1 Tablespoon butter
1 Tablespoon olive oil
1 large onion, diced
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 ounce dry vermouth
2 ounces tomato paste
1 pound Black Cherry Heirloom Tomatoes or your favorite variety
1/2 cup vegetable stock or water
salt and pepper to taste

Place a large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat.  Add butter and olive oil.  Once the butter is melted, add the onion and stir to coat.  Cook until the onion is translucent, approximately 5 minutes.  Add the garlic and cook for one minute.  Add the vermouth, scraping the bottom of the pan to release any caramelized pieces of onion or garlic.  Add the tomato paste and stir to fully combine.

Add the cherry tomatoes to the pan and stir to combine.  Allow the tomatoes to cook for 2-3 minutes or until they begin to soften and release their juices.  Using the back of a spoon or a potato masher, lightly crush the tomatoes.  Reduce the heat the low.  Allow the sauce to simmer for 10 minutes or until thick.  Taste for seasoning, adding salt and pepper as needed.   Add more broth if necessary to achieve the desired consistency.

Reduce the heat to low and allow the sauce to continue to simmer, adding liquid if necessary.  The longer the tomatoes are allowed to cook, the more intense their flavor will be.  Serve the sauce spooned over polenta, spaghetti, or tossed with your favorite pasta, topping with freshly grated Parmesan cheese if desired.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/slow-roasted-cherry-tomato-sauce/

Broiled Cast Iron Skillet Eggs with Heirloom Tomatoes

I am always looking for a recipe that offers me a new way to prepare our fresh eggs to serve at our family table.  If that new recipe also includes heirloom tomatoes, all the better.  I happened upon this recipe in a copy of Martha Stewart Living from June 2011.  The technique was so simple and the photo so beautiful, that I couldn’t wait to try it.

The original recipe calls for using a nonstick skillet, but I prefer to prepare it in one of our seasoned cast iron skillets. I chose to use a locally produced smoked cheddar cheese and the heirloom tomatoes fresh from our raised bed  garden.  In a matter of minutes, this dish was ready to be served alongside a salad of fresh greens and a homemade flatbread.

The eggs were delicious.  They paired so well with the melted smoked cheddar and heirloom tomatoes that we couldn’t wait to enjoy them again.  Of course, we also couldn’t wait to try them with other types of cheese.  When heirloom tomato season ends, we’ll be experimenting with other flavor combinations.  Don’t worry, we’ll share our seasonal favorites right here with you!

Broiled Cast Iron Skillet Eggs with Heirloom Tomatoes
Inspired by Eggs Kevin from Martha Stewart Living, June 2011
Serves 2 as a main course

When preparing this dish for more than two people, I like to use two skillets.  You could use a single skillet, increasing the cooking time as needed to compensate for the slightly crowded pan.

1 Tablespoon butter
4 fresh eggs
salt and pepper
1 large heirloom tomato, sliced
fresh thyme
1/4 cup to 1/2 cup smoked cheddar cheese, grated

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.  By preheating the oven, your broiler will be better able to properly finish the eggs in an incredibly short amount of time.

Heat a large cast iron skillet over medium high heat.  When the pan is hot, add the butter, swirling to coat the surface of the bottom of the pan.  Crack the eggs into the skillet and season with salt and pepper.  Allow the eggs to cook for 1-2 minutes or until the whites are beginning to set.

Remove from the pan from the heat.  Evenly arrange the heirloom tomato slices in the pan.  Top with a sprinkling of fresh thyme and cover with the shredded cheddar.

Transfer the skillet to the preheated oven.  Turn on the broiler and broil until the whites are completely set and the yolks are done to your liking, approximately 1-2 minutes.  Remove from the oven and serve warm.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/broiled-cast-iron-skillet-eggs-with-heirloom-tomatoes/

Oven Roasted Heirloom Tomato Ricotta Tart

I originally posted this recipe back in the very early days of writing this blog.  It seems fitting that this would be one of the longest lived recipes on the blog as it has been a family favorite since before we made 1840 Farm our home.  Each summer, we look forward to this rustic tart topped with our homegrown heirloom tomatoes.

The combination of flavors in this dish is perfectly balanced.  The acidity and earthiness of the tomatoes is the star, but the creamy ricotta and bright basil accent it deliciously.  It’s no wonder that this dish is a perennial family favorite.

 

Oven Roasted Heirloom Tomato Ricotta Tart
serves 4 – 6 as a main course

This recipe was inspired by a recipe published in Martha Stewart’s FOOD.  I use homemade bread crumbs from our Farmhouse Country Loaf for the crust.  Prepared bread crumbs or panko are also delicious. 

180 grams (2 cups) breadcrumbs
2 ounces (4 Tablespoons) olive oil
16 ounces ricotta cheese
2 ounces mozzarella cheese, cubed or shredded
1 ounce Parmesan cheese, grated
1 large egg
2 Tablespoons chopped fresh basil
1 pound heirloom tomatoes
olive oil for brushing
salt and pepper

Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.  Prepare a 9 inch springform pan by wrapping the bottom in aluminum foil.  Set aside.   j

Slice bread into thick slices and place in the oven to dry.  When dry and cool, use a food processor to chop the toasted bread into fresh breadcrumbs.  With the motor running, add the olive oil and process until evenly moist.  Press mixture evenly in prepared pan, covering the bottom of the pan.

Rinse out the bowl and blade from the food processor.  Add ricotta cheese, mozzarella and Parmesan cheese, and egg to the food processor and process until completely smooth.  Add basil and pulse until basil is evenly distributed throughout the ricotta mixture.

Carefully add the ricotta mixture to the springform pan., spreading to cover. Slice heirloom tomatoes and place on top of the ricotta, overlapping where needed to fully cover the top.  Brush the top of the tart with olive oil and sprinkle with salt and pepper.

Place springform pan on a baking sheet and transfer to the preheated oven.  Bake for 40 minutes or until the tomatoes are beginning to dry and the ricotta mixture has become firm and golden.

Remove from the oven and allow to cool for ten minutes.  Carefully run a thin metal spatula or paring knife around the outside edge of the tart to loosen it from the pan.  Unmold the tart, cut into slices and serve warm.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/oven-roasted-heirloom-tomato-ricotta-tart/

1840 Farm Multigrain Waffles

I began making these waffles a few years ago. When I came across a recipe for “Waffles of Insane Greatness”, I couldn’t help myself. My curiosity simply got the best of me. I had to know. Were these waffles really that good?

My entire family was a bit skeptical. We already had a favorite recipe for homemade waffles. We didn’t think that this recipe would win us over. We were so wrong.  After the first bite, we were sold. It was crispy on the outside with a light interior and wonderful flavor. It was official: we had a new favorite recipe for homemade waffles.

A few months ago, I was invited to take part in the Grain Mill Wagon Challenge to create a series of recipes using freshly ground flours and meals using a WonderMill Electric Grain Mill.  Our tried and true recipe for waffles was one of the first recipes I incorporated our home ground flour and meal into.

I wouldn’t have believed that it was possible to improve upon our waffle recipe, but I was wrong again.  The fresh flour and meal added such a fantastic, earthy flavor to the batter.  Once the waffles were topped with butter and our favorite maple syrup from Lowell’s Sugar Shack, they were better than great.  They were perfect.

1840 Farm Multigrain Waffles
adapted from Aretha Frankenstein’s Waffles of Insane Greatness
Makes 6 large Belgian waffles

Our version of the original recipe has evolved quite a bit since that infamous first bite.  I substitute our freshly milled wholegrain flour for much of the All-purpose flour called for in the original recipe.  Adding a bit of our freshly ground cornmeal helps to create a waffle with fantastic texture.  If you don’t have access to freshly ground flour or cornmeal, you can substitute whole wheat flour and standard cornmeal.

I also like to use both butter and vegetable oil in the batter.  I find that the butter delivers a crispier crust while the oil keeps the interior of the waffle moist.  Instead of using sugar to sweeten the batter, I like to substitute real maple syrup.  When combined with our home brewed vanilla extract, it lends a sweet, earthy flavor to the batter.

¾ cup (90 grams) freshly milled whole wheat flour
½ cup (60 grams) freshly ground cornmeal
¼ cup (30 grams) All-purpose flour
½ cup cornstarch
1 teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon baking soda
½ teaspoon salt
6 Tablespoons butter
1 ¾ cup (14 ounces) milk
1 Tablespoon apple cider vinegar
¼ cup vegetable oil
2 large eggs
2 Tablespoons pure maple syrup
1 Tablespoon vanilla extract

In a large bowl, combine the flours, cornmeal, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.  Gently whisk to combine.

In a microwave safe bowl or measuring cup, melt the butter by microwaving in 20 second intervals.  Add milk, apple cider vinegar, and oil to the butter and whisk to combine.  Add the eggs, maple syrup, and vanilla to this mixture and whisk until smooth.

Add the liquid ingredients to the dry and whisk until completely smooth.  Allow the batter to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.

Near the end of the half hour, preheat your waffle maker.  Preheat the oven to 200 degrees Fahrenheit.  Once they come to temperature, oil the plates of the waffle iron using oil or pan spray.  Follow the guidelines for your waffle maker to fill and cook the waffles.

Keep the cooked waffles warm by placing them on a wire rack in the preheated oven.  Continue preparing the waffles until you have used all of the batter.  Serve hot with butter and pure maple syrup.

Leftover waffles can be frozen for later use.  Allow the waffles to cool to room temperature before freezing.  Frozen waffles can be reheated in a toaster, toaster oven, or waffle maker.


This recipe was shared on the Grain Mill Wagon Challenge.


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/08/1840-farm-multigrain-waffles/

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