Category Archive: Pie

Pie recipes, tips, and methods from 1840 Farm

Chocolate Cream Pie

Chocolate Cream Pie BrandedChocolate.  Cream.  Pie.  Need I say more?  I didn’t think so.  What could be better than a combination of rich, chocolate cream made from scratch over a crumb pie crust topped with vanilla bean whipped cream?  For a pie lover like me, adding chocolate to the mix sends this recipe to the top of my favorites list.

With Valentine’s Day fast approaching, this recipe is perfect for treating your loved ones to a delicious homemade dessert.  My Valentines are chocolate lovers, so this pie often finds a place at our table on and around Valentine’s Day.  It never fails to delight each and every one of them.

In our house, we bake and eat around food allergies, so the first step in any recipe is ensuring that the ingredients are safe to keep in our nut free home.   Finding premium quality chocolate that is free from nut allergens would be a difficult task if it wasn’t for Vermont Nut Free Chocolates.  Thanks to their delicious line of nut free baking ingredients, chocolates, and treats, I always know that the baking ingredients I keep in the pantry and use in our farmhouse kitchen are safe for our whole family.

In this recipe, I use three different types of chocolate from Vermont Nut Free Chocolates.  I found that combining milk chocolate, dark chocolate, and unsweetened chocolate yielded the most delicious result.  If you don’t have nut allergies to consider when making this dessert, you can substitute your favorite brand of chocolate when making this recipe with equally delicious results.

This pie is also the perfect recipe to use the very best vanilla extract you have available.  In our house, that means reaching for our homemade vanilla extract.  Its rich amber color, intense flavor, and fragrant aroma are the perfect counterpoint to the chocolate filling and whipped cream topping.  You can learn more about making your own vanilla extract and our vanilla extract kits in our Mercantile Shop.

I hope that you will enjoy making and serving this delicious pie as much as I do.  I turn to it time and time again when I want to treat my family to a dessert that puts a smile on every face gathered around our table.  It never disappoints!

 

Chocolate Cream Pie
Print
For the Crumb Pie Crust
  1. 200 grams (approximately half a box) of graham crackers
  2. 6 Tablespoons butter, melted
For the Chocolate Filling
  1. 4 large egg yolks
  2. 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  3. ¼ cup cornstarch
  4. ½ teaspoon salt
  5. 2 ½ cups whole milk
  6. 3 ounces milk chocolate
  7. 3 ounces dark chocolate
  8. 1 ounce unsweetened baking chocolate
  9. 2 Tablespoons butter
  10. 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
For the Whipped Cream Topping
  1. 8 ounces heavy whipping cream
  2. 1 Tablespoon granulated sugar
  3. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
To Make the Crust
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Place the graham crackers in a food processor or blender. Pulse/process until the crackers have been reduced to fine crumbs. If you prefer, you can place the graham crackers on a sheet tray and use a rolling pin to crush them to a uniform, fine crumb.
  3. Melt the butter in a small saucepan or microwave. Place the graham cracker crumbs and butter in a medium bowl and stir until the crumbs are evenly moistened. Transfer the crumb mixture to a pie plate and gently press it into the bottom and sides of the pan. The crumbs should come together to form a crust.
  4. Transfer the pie plate to the preheated oven. Bake for 15 minutes. Remove the plate from the oven and allow the crust to cool to room temperature.
To Make the Chocolate Filling
  1. In a medium saucepan, combine the egg yolks, sugar, cornstarch, and salt. Whisk the ingredients together until they form a thick, smooth mixture. Slowly add the whole milk, whisking to fully combine and prevent lumps from forming. Place the saucepan over low heat and add the chocolate, whisking until it is completely melted and the mixture is smooth. Increase the heat to medium and bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally to prevent the mixture from scorching on the bottom of the pan. Simmer until the mixture is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.
  2. Remove the pan from the heat. Add the butter and vanilla and stir until the butter is melted and the mixture is smooth. Allow to cool slightly as you prepare the whipped cream, stirring occasionally to prevent a skin from forming on the surface. Once the mixture has cooled to lukewarm or room temperature, transfer it to the pie plate, spreading it evenly over the baked pie crust.
To Make the Whipped Cream Topping
  1. Place the whipping cream, sugar, and vanilla extract in the bowl of a stand mixer or a large mixing bowl. Using a whisk attachment for your stand mixer or beaters for a hand mixer, beat the cream and sugar on high speed until it forms stiff peaks.
  2. Transfer the whipped cream to the pie, spreading it gently to evenly cover the surface of the chocolate filling. Chill the pie until you are ready to serve.
Notes
  1. Our family lives and bakes around nut allergies, so our farmhouse kitchen is nut free. This recipe uses one of our nut free favorites: Vermont Nut Free Chocolates baking pieces and cocoa powder. You can learn all about them at www.vermontnutfree.com.
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This recipe is included in our Valentine’s Day recipe gallery.  You’ll find our favorite homemade Valentine’s Day recipes there just waiting for you!

Valentines Gallery


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Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2017/01/chocolate-cream-pie/

Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie – Nut Free

Nut Free Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie As a child, every Thanksgiving and Christmas was celebrated with my paternal grandmother’s homemade pies. She always had a collection of them fresh out of the oven, ready to mark the end of another family meal. I could always count on finding some sort of seasonal pie along with pecan and her famous schwatzenberry.

ChocolateBourbonPecanPieTopThose warm memories have stayed with me over the years. They’ve also ensured that we mark Thanksgiving and Christmas celebrations with homemade pies at our farmhouse table.   Because of the food allergies we cook and bake around, we haven’t always been able to enjoy the flavor of a pecan pie at our family table. I missed the earthy, nutty flavor of pecan pie, but there was simply no safe way to enjoy the flavor without worry of cross contamination and allergic reactions.

It was almost five years ago that I first discovered that I could create completely nut free baked goods in our farmhouse kitchen that had the delicious nutty flavor we were missing due to nut allergies.  Wheat Nuts® became a pantry staple, allowing me to bring back a few flavors from my past without introducing nuts into our home.

Sadly, Wheat Nuts® products disappeared from the market in 2013, leaving us without the ingredient and snack we loved so much. Earlier this year, I received the wonderful news that these nut free and tasty snacks were being produced and were available to purchase. It was a moment worth celebrating in our nut free kitchen. When we discovered that there was an entirely new collection of nut free snacks and ingredients being offered, I couldn’t wait to place my order and start creating new recipes to enjoy during the holiday season and beyond.

You can order the following varieties which are all manufactured in a 100% nut free facility:Wheat Nuts and Nadanut

Wheat Nuts®
Nadanut® Salted Pecans
Nadanut® Unsalted Pecans
Nadanut® Salted Cashews
Nadanut® small chopped pecan pieces
Nadanut® medium chopped pecan pieces
Nadanut® small chopped walnut pieces
Nadanut® small chopped pistachio pieces

For the first time in far too many years, I will be serving this nut free pecan pie at our Thanksgiving table.  I hope that you will join us in serving this delicious pie to your friends and family and that they will enjoy it as much as we do.

Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie

In our nut free home, we use Nadanut® snacks to add the flavor of pecans without any worry of allergens paying a visit to our family table. If you aren’t baking with nut allergies in mind, you can easily substitute 2 cups of pecans in this recipe with delicious results. If you find yourself struggling when making homemade pie crust, read my simple pie crust tips and make flaky, delicious pie crust like a pro.

1 ½ cups (180 grams) All-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon salt
4 ounces (1 stick) butter, grated
4-6 Tablespoons ice water

2 Tablespoons butter
¾ cup bittersweet chocolate chips or chunks
2 Tablespoons heavy cream
2 large eggs
1 cup (120 grams) dark brown sugar
¼ cup maple syrup
2 Tablespoons bourbon
1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
¼ teaspoon salt
1 cup Nadanut® small chopped pecan pieces
½ cup Nadanut® Unsalted Pecans
½ cup Nadanut® medium chopped pecan pieces

To make the crust, place flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor.  Pulse the dry ingredients to combine.  Add the grated butter and pulse until the butter has begun to incorporate into the flour and resembles small grains of rice.

With the motor running, add ice water one Tablespoon at a time until the dough forms a ball.  Take care not to over process the dough.  Over processing will help to develop the gluten in the flour and lead to a crust that is chewy and tough.  Less is more when it comes to working pie crust and will result in a flaky, light crust.

Transfer the pie crust dough to a pie plate.  Using your fingers, press the dough into shape gently until it is a uniform thickness and completely covers the bottom and sides of the pie plate. Work around the plate, rolling any excess crust underneath to form a thick ridge along the edge of the pie.  Using your fingers, flute the edge of the crust or use a fork to crimp along the edge.  Continue until the entire perimeter has been sealed. Transfer the pie plate to the refrigerator to chill while the oven warms and the filling is prepared.

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit.  Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil to catch any pie filling that may bubble over during baking.  Set aside.

In a small pan set over low heat, warm the butter and chocolate until melted and smooth, stirring often to prevent scorching. Remove the pan from the heat and add the heavy cream, stirring until completely smooth.

In a large mixing bowl, combine the eggs, sugar, and maple syrup. Whisk until smooth. Add the bourbon, vanilla, and salt. Stir to combine before adding the Nadanut® pieces (or pecans). Add the melted chocolate mixture to the bowl and stir until the filling is well combined.

Remove the pie plate from the refrigerator. Transfer the filling to the pie plate, spreading evenly. Place the pie on top of the prepared baking sheet and transfer it to the preheated oven.  Bake for 55 minutes or until the top of the filling has developed a crisp golden brown shell and the pie crust is evenly brown.  Rotating the pie midway through the baking time will help to ensure that your pie is evenly baked.

Remove the pie from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool.  Serve warm or at room temperature.  Top with vanilla ice cream or freshly whipped cream if desired.

Our family lives and bakes around nut allergies, so our farmhouse kitchen is nut free.  This recipe uses one of our nut free favorites: Nadanut Nut Free Snacks.  You can learn all about them at www.nadanut.com

 


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

thanksgiving-gallery-ss


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/chocolate-bourbon-pecan-pie-nut-free/

Homemade Fresh Pumpkin Purée

Homemade Fresh Pumpkin Puree at 1840 FarmFor me, Thanksgiving would be incomplete without a homemade pumpkin pie. In fact, I hold pumpkin pie in such high regard that I spent weeks perfecting my artwork of a pumpkin pie for our Etsy Shop.

For years, I made my pumpkin pie using canned pumpkin purée. Organic canned pumpkin purée was readily available at my local grocery store and both the color and flavor were good enough to be included in our holiday pumpkin pie. Then I noticed that the supply seemed to dwindle each year and the price increased every season. Suddenly, I began to wonder if I could make my own homemade pumpkin purée.

We had some sugar pie pumpkins from our garden that year and our local farmer’s markets and farm stands had them in abundance and at a very affordable price. Once I made my first batch, I found myself wondering why I hadn’t started making my own fresh pumpkin purée sooner. The process was simple, hands off, and produced a thick, rich purée full of fresh flavor.

This homemade pumpkin purée will be featured in the pumpkin pie at our Thanksgiving feast this year. Now you can follow this simple recipe and make your own fresh pumpkin purée for yours!

PumpkinPureeFinalHomemade Fresh Pumpkin Purée

I choose small Sugar Pie Pumpkins for my homemade purée. I find that they are full of earthy pumpkin flavor and are easy to work with. Their small size makes them easy to handle and fit two or mPumpkinPureeSeedsPulpore in the slow cooker at once. A small pumpkin that weighs around 1 ½ pounds will produce approximately one pound of purée, slightly more than a single can of store bought pumpkin purée.

Wash the pumpkins to remove any dirt and debris from the exterior. Using a sharp knife, quarter the pumpkin and remove the stem. With a spoon, remove the seeds and pulpy flesh connecting the seeds to the pumpkin.

I reserve this pumpkin to share with our hens. You can read my post to learn more about pumpkin’s health benefits for your hens and learn how to make them a warm, nutritious oatmeal. The seeds and flesh provide our flock with a delicious and healthy treat.

Place the pumpkin quarters in the slow cooker. Place the cover on the slow cooker and turn the heat on high.

At the two hour mark, check the pumpkin for doneness with the tip of a sharp knife or fork. It should easily yield and be soft and fully cooked. At this point, I turn off the heat, return the lid to the pot, and allow the pumpkin to cool to room temperature.

When cool, scrape the tender pulp from the skin using a large spoon. Purée the pulp in a food processor, blender, or by hand with a potato masher.

Homemade pumpkin purée can be used immediately, stored for several days in the refrigerator, or frozen for up to one year.

This process can also be used with other winter squashes to create homemade squash puree for soups and savory dishes.

 


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

thanksgiving-gallery-ss


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/homemade-fresh-pumpkin-puree/

Heirloom Tomato Pie

Heirloom Tomato Pie at 1840 FarmIf I ranked my favorite foods, heirloom tomatoes and homemade pie would both be at the top of my list.  In fact, they might occupy the first and second spot.  Please don’t ask me to choose one of them as my absolute favorite because I’m not sure that I could.

Thanks to this recipe, I can combine my love of the two and serve a delicious dinner at our family table.  Heirloom Tomato Pie is a family favorite when we are harvesting ripe heirloom tomatoes from our garden every day.  It combines the delicious flavors of heirloom tomatoes with the richness of buttery pie crust.  It also beautifully pairs the soft texture of the ripe fruit with flaky pie crust.  One bite and you’ll understand why we love it so much!

 

Heirloom Tomato Pie
Serves 4 to 6

If you have a favorite pie crust recipe, it can be put to good use in this recipe.  I like to make a slightly savory crust by adding my favorite olive oils from the Fresh-Pressed Olive Oil Club instead of the ice water usually called for in a pie crust recipe.  The resulting pie crust is flaky and delicious, filled with the earthy flavor of great olive oil. You can read my favorite pie crust tips to create a delicious pie crust every single time.

The pie crust in this recipe should be blind baked, or prebaked before the filling is added.  Because the tomato filling is so juicy, adding it to an unbaked pie crust would result in a soggy crust.  By blind baking the crust and topping it with a bit of grated cheese, the crust will develop into a flaky base for the unctuous filling.Heirloom Tomato Pie Crust at 1840 Farm

1 1/2 pounds ripe heirloom tomatoes
2 cups (240 grams) All-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
8 Tablespoons (4 ounces) butter, grated
4 Tablespoons (2 ounces) extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, grated
1 teaspoon olive oil
1 onion, minced
2 Tablespoons basil, chopped
2 ounces mozzarella cheese, grated
2 ounces smoked mozzarella cheese, grated
8 ounces ricotta cheese
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 eggs
Balsamic glaze for serving, if desired

Slice the tomatoes into 1″ thick rounds.  Place them in a colander to drain as you prepare the crust.  Allowing some of the excess liquid to drain away will help to concentrate the tomato flavor and yield a rich, thick filling.

To make the crust, place the flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor.  Pulse the dry ingredients to combine.  Add the grated butter and pulse until the butter has begun to incorporate into the flour and resembles small grains of rice.

With the motor running, add the olive oil one Tablespoon at a time until the dough forms a ball.  Take care not to over process the dough.  Over processing will help to develop the gluten in the flour and lead to a crust that is chewy and tough.  Less is more when it comes to working pie crust and will result in a flaky, light crust.

Transfer the pie crust dough to a pie plate.  Using your fingers, press the dough into shape gently until it is a uniform thickness and completely covers the bottom and sides of the pie plate. Flute or decorate the top edge if desired and transfer the pie plate to the refrigerator to chill while the oven warms.

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit.  Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil to catch any pie filling that may bubble over during baking.  When the oven has come up to temperature, remove the pie plate from the refrigerator and place on the baking sheet. Line the plate with a sheet of aluminum foil, pressing very gently to settle it into the edges of the crust.  Add dried beans, rice, or ceramic pie weights to weigh down the crust as it bakes.

Place the pie plate on the lined baking sheet before transferring to the hot oven. Blind bake for 15-20 minutes, until the crust begins to set up but before it begins to brown. Remove the crust from the oven.  Carefully remove the foil and beans, rice, or weights.  These items will be extremely hot, so take care when removing them. After the weights have cooled, they can be stored and used over and over again.

Heirloom Tomato Pie FillingReduce the oven temperature to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.  Sprinkle half of the grated Parmesan cheese over the bottom of the blind baked pie crust.  Allow the crust to cool as you prepare the filling.

In a small skillet over medium heat, sauté the onion in a teaspoon of olive oil until translucent, approximately 5-8 minutes.  Stir frequently to prevent the onion from burning.  Remove from heat and allow to cool slightly.

In a large bowl, create the filling.  Combine the mozzarella cheese, smoked mozzarella, ricotta, mayonnaise, and eggs.  Stir until smooth.  Season with salt and pepper.

Arrange the sliced tomatoes to cover the bottom of the pie crust.  Spread the sautéed onions over the tomatoes and sprinkle the basil on top.  Season with salt and pepper.  Transfer the filling to the pie, spreading gently to completely cover the tomatoes.  Sprinkle the remaining Parmesan cheese on top.

Transfer the pie to the 400 degree oven.  Bake until the filling is lightly set in the middle and bubbly and browned on top, approximately 30 minutes.  If the filling sets before it has browned sufficiently on top, simply broil the pie for a brief few minutes.  Remove from the oven and allow to cool for 5-10 minutes before slicing and serving.


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Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/09/heirloom-tomato-pie/

Pi Day 3.1415

FB_PiDay_2015
When asked to declare my favorite food to prepare and enjoy with my family, I don’t have to ponder long.  The answer is simple:  pie.  I love to make pie almost as much as I love to eat a delicious, flaky pie crust filled to the brim with the best of what the season (or our panty and freezer) have to offer.

A homemade berry pie has the power to transport me to my paternal grandmother’s humble kitchen.  My grandmother was a wonderful cook and baker, but pie was her specialty.  Her schwatzenberry pie was my favorite.  It would not be overstating its power to say that those berry pies forever changed my life.

My grandmother’s homemade berry pie taught me that food had the ability to feed my soul. I now know that it also holds the incredible power of transcending time and space, bringing back memories of a grandmother long gone, but known fondly by my children who never had the opportunity to meet her in person.

Instead, they met her memory with the first bite of berry pie savored at our family table while listening to me share my fondest memories about her. Every summer, we carefully pick the schwatzenberries from our garden and look forward to the day when we have gathered enough to make the season’s first pie.

Throughout the year, we enjoy pies of every sort.  Our annual Kentucky Derby Day celebration would seem incomplete without a homemade Bourbon Peach Pie.  Summer would be much less sweet if raspberry season didn’t include the promise of a Double Crusted Raspberry Pie.  When fall’s apple season arrives at our local farmer’s market, I find myself dreaming of a slice of Brandied Apple Pie topped with a generous scoop of vanilla ice cream.

Each year, we celebrate Pi Day on March 14th by making and enjoying a homemade pie together here at 1840 Farm.  The day is publicized in the hope of inviting us to all learn more about the mathematical significance of Pi and the importance of math in our daily lives.  I’m happy to extol the virtues of math, especially if I can do so by spending time in the farmhouse kitchen making my favorite dish for our family table.

This year, we’re gearing up to celebrate a Pi Day of epic proportions.  In 2015, Pi Day falls on 3/14/15.  Given that Pi begins with “3.1415”, it seems like this year’s celebration should be extra special.  We’re still debating which of our favorite pie recipes should be called into service for our celebration tomorrow.

I hope that you will join in the celebration and add one of these pie recipes to your weekend plans.  I’ve included a few pie crust making tips for good measure.  I receive so many messages from readers who are intimidated by the thought of making a homemade pie crust.  Using these tips, you will make a deliciously flaky pie crust that will delight your friends and family, I promise!

You can view our special Pi Day Newsletter and add your name to our thousands of subscribers.  Our newsletter is the best way to make sure that you don’t miss our favorite seasonal recipes, giveaways, and posts.  You can subscribe in a few seconds and know that we will never share your Email address with anyone.

We have our biggest giveaway EVER coming to you in the next few weeks and our subscribers will be the first to know about it.  Believe me, you’re not going to want to miss out on this one.  Well, at least not if you’d be happy to win a fantastic piece of kitchen equipment that was tested right here in the farmhouse kitchen and has a value of more than $350!

Happy Pi Day!

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/03/pi-day-3-1415/

Pie Crust Tips

PieCrustTipsBrandedIf you’ve been following this blog for very long, you know how much I love pie.  I was fortunate to grow up with a Grandmother who loved to bake pie.  She loved to serve me and the other members of our family one of her pies.  Now I find myself making homemade pies for my family and our friends.

I don’t have my Grandmother’s recipe.  In fact, I doubt that she had a recipe that was written down on paper.  She cooked and baked by feel, adding a bit of this or a bit of that.  She had been honing her skills for decades, recipes were no longer necessary by the time I was sitting in the kitchen watching her work her magic.

Pie was one of the first dishes that I taught myself to make.  I wanted so badly to master that flaky, delicious crust that my Grandmother had seemed to make so effortlessly.  I tried in vain, turning out pies that had tough, chewy dough where I had hoped that the light, flaky crust would be.

With each pie, my skills improved.  Along the way, I picked up a few tricks that have helped me to make flaky, light pie crusts without fail.  It seemed only fair for me to share a few of those tips with you.  I hope that you’ll find them helpful and that you’ll be enjoying a delicious homemade pie with your family this holiday season.

Pie Crust Tip 01

 

Pie Crust Tip 02

 

Pie Crust Tip 03

 


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes  right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

thanksgiving-gallery-ss


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2014/11/pie-crust-tips/

Raspberry Pie

Raspberry Pie at 1840 FarmI adore fresh pie.  I love to make it as much as I love to enjoy a slice with my family.  One bite of a freshly baked berry pie and I am magically transformed to a time and place deeply imbedded in my childhood.  I simply can’t eat a slice of berry pie without thinking of the time I spent in my Grandmother’s kitchen as a young child.

I don’t wait for a holiday to bake pie.  We enjoy them all year long.  Bourbon Peach Pie with Brown Sugar Topping is a Derby Day tradition.  Brandied Apple Pie with Cinnamon Sugar Topping is a wonderful way to celebrate the arrival of fall.  Berry pie is a summer staple, allowing us to showcase the fresh raspberries, blackberries, blueberries, and schwatzenberries that we grow right in our backyard.

During raspberry season, I love to make double crusted pies filled with fresh raspberries picked from the 1840 Farm garden.  A warm slice topped with a small scoop of vanilla bean ice cream is a powerful reminder of why we toil all year to enjoy our garden harvest.  With every bite, we’re reminded of the delicious rewards of farming on the homestead.

Raspberry Pie
Print
Ingredients
  1. 2 cups (240 grams) All-purpose flour
  2. ½ teaspoon salt
  3. 5 ounces butter, cubed
  4. 6-7 Tablespoons ice water
  5. 1 pound (approximately 4 cups) fresh berries
  6. ¾ cup (144 grams) granulated sugar
  7. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  8. 3 Tablespoons cornstarch
  9. 2 Tablespoons tapioca
  10. 4 Tablespoons water
  11. 3 Tablespoons butter, cubed
Instructions
  1. To make the crust, place flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse the dry ingredients to combine. Add the cubed butter and pulse until the butter has begun to incorporate into the flour and resembles small grains of rice.
  2. With the motor running, add ice water one Tablespoon at a time until the dough forms a ball. Take care not to over process the dough. Over processing will help to develop the gluten in the flour and lead to a crust that is less flaky. Remove the crust from the processor, shape into a flat disk, and place on a sheet of waxed paper or plastic wrap. Refrigerate while the filling is prepared.
  3. To prepare the berry filling, combine berries, sugar, vanilla, cornstarch, tapioca, and water in a large bowl. Mix gently to combine. Set aside to allow the berries to begin releasing their juices.
  4. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil to catch any pie filling that may bubble over during baking. Set aside.
  5. Remove the chilled pie dough from the refrigerator. Cut the disk into two equal pieces. Roll the bottom crust into a smooth disk large enough to line the pie plate. Rolling will be much easier if done on a well-floured surface or between two sheets of freezer paper or waxed paper.
  6. Place the bottom crust in the pie plate, taking care not to stretch the dough. By gently lifting the edges of the crust, the dough will naturally come to rest on the bottom of the pie plate without stretching. Stretching the crust too much will yield a chewy crust instead of one that is flaky and light. Continue this technique around the perimeter of the pie plate.
  7. Stir the prepared filling before gently placing it on top of the bottom crust in the pie plate. Evenly distribute the cubed 3 Tablespoons of butter on top of the filling. Roll out the remaining portion of pie crust until it is large enough to cover the top surface of the pie. If you will be using a pie bird, place it in the middle of the filling before setting the top crust and cut a slit in the middle of the crust to accommodate the pie bird. If not, simply place the crust on top of the filling, centering it over the pie plate.
  8. Work around the plate, rolling the excess crust underneath to form a thick ridge along the edge of the pie. Using your fingers, flute the edge of the crust or use a fork to crimp along the edge. Continue until the entire perimeter has been sealed. Using a sharp knife, cut several slits in the surface of the top crust. Doing so will allow steam to escape from the filling as it bakes.
  9. Place the pie on top of the prepared baking sheet and transfer it to the preheated oven. Bake for 15 minutes before reducing the temperature to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Continue to bake for 45-55 minutes or until the top crust is a beautiful, light golden brown. Rotating the pie midway through the baking time will help to ensure that your pie is evenly brown.
  10. Remove the pie from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool. Serve warm or at room temperature. Top with vanilla ice cream if desired.
Notes
  1. I make this pie using blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries with great success. If you don’t have fresh berries, frozen berries may be substituted. Gently thaw or defrost frozen berries before making the filling mixture and omit the added water from the recipe. I prefer my berry pie to be on the tart side. If your preference is for a sweeter pie, increase the sugar to a full cup.
  2. To save time, I usually mix my pie crust in my food processor. This recipe can be made in a bowl using a dough blender or a large fork. Either way, the result will be a flaky, buttery crust that pairs deliciously with the berry filling.
  3. I like to use a ceramic pie bird when baking a double crusted pie. If you don't have a pie bird, simply cut a few more slits in the top crust to allow excess steam to escape. Doing so will ensure that your filling will be thick and that the top crust will be flaky.
  4. If you're looking for a fabulous handmade ceramic pie bird like the one shown in this recipe's photo, visit Blue Hen Pottery. Photos simply don't do these little birds justice. My collection keeps growing and I often give them as gifts to friends and family. Tell them 1840 Farm sent you and choose a beautiful handmade bird to last for generations to come. You'll find them at http://www.bluehenpottery.net/
1840farm.com http://1840farm.com/

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/07/raspberry-pie/

Bourbon Peach Pie with Brown Sugar Topping

Bourbon Peach Pie with Brown Sugar Topping at 1840 FarmI love to make pie. I have written several times about the reasons why I enjoy making and eating homemade pie. I shared them last year during The Daily Meal and Kikkoman’s Tradition Exchange.  In fact, I truly enjoy writing pie recipes and incorporating my memories of my Grandmother and the pies that were always waiting to welcome us to her home.

Pie was among the first recipes I taught myself to make.  I was in junior high when I finally mastered pie making.  It had taken me several attempts to get a feel for rolling out the dough evenly and transferring it to the pie plate without ending up with holes, rips, tears, and a rising frustration level.

Luckily, my parents were willing taste testers.  They didn’t comment when the crust wasn’t as flaky as I had hoped.  They didn’t complain when the crust’s edge was more towards the burnt end of the baking spectrum than I had ever intended.  Through their patience and my persistence, I emerged as a capable pie baker.

I don’t recall my grandmother ever making peach pie, but this is perhaps the most requested pie recipe in my collection.  If I announce that I will be making pie, my family begins making a case for this recipe in the hopes that I will make one of these for our family table.  Each fall, we pick local peaches that I peel and slice to freeze and keep on hand for just such an occasion.

Be forewarned.  Once you serve one of these delicious pies to your family and friends, you’ll find yourself in the same predicament.  When you head into the kitchen to make pie, your family will react as my family does by asking, “Are you making bourbon peach pie?”

 

Bourbon Peach Pie with Brown Sugar Topping
Yields 9
Each year, I peel and slice peaches when they’re at their seasonal best before freezing them on a sheet pan. Once they’re completely frozen, I place them in resealable freezer bags and keep them all year long. When using frozen peach slices, simply warm them for 2 minutes in a microwave safe bowl before using them to make the filling.
Print
For the crust
  1. 1 1/2 cups (180 grams) All-purpose flour
  2. 1/4 teaspoon sea salt
  3. 8 Tablespoons (4 ounces) butter, chilled
  4. 4 – 6 Tablespoons ice water
For the filling
  1. 3 cups (1 pound) peeled, sliced peaches
  2. 2 ounces bourbon ( I prefer Buffalo Trace brand)
  3. 3/4 cup (144 grams) granulated sugar
  4. 1 Tablespoon lemon juice
  5. 2 Tablespoons tapioca
For the topping
  1. 3/4 cup (144 grams) brown sugar
  2. 1 cup (120 grams) All-purpose flour
  3. 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  4. 4 Tablespoons (2 ounces) butter, melted
Instructions
  1. To save time, I usually make my pie crust in my food processor. This recipe can also be made in a bowl using a dough blender or a large fork. Either way, the result will be a flaky, buttery crust that pairs deliciously with the peach filling.
  2. To make the crust, place flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor. Pulse the dry ingredients to combine. Add the cubed butter and pulse until the butter has begun to incorporate into the flour and resembles small grains of rice.
  3. With the motor running, add ice water one Tablespoon at a time until the dough forms a ball. Take care not to over process the dough. Over processing will help to develop the gluten in the flour and lead to a crust that is less flaky. Remove the crust from the processor, shape into a flat disk, and place on a sheet of waxed paper or plastic wrap. Refrigerate while the filling is prepared.
  4. To prepare the filling, combine the peach slices, bourbon, sugar, lemon juice and tapioca in a large bowl. Mix gently to combine. Set aside.
  5. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil to catch any pie filling that may bubble over during baking. Set aside.
  6. Remove the chilled pie dough from the refrigerator. Roll the crust into a smooth disk large enough to line the pie plate. Rolling will be much easier if done on a well-floured surface or between two sheets of freezer paper or waxed paper.
  7. Place the bottom crust in the pie plate, taking care not to stretch the dough. By gently lifting the edges of the crust, the dough will naturally come to rest on the bottom of the pie plate without stretching. Continue this technique around the perimeter of the pie plate. Stir the prepared filling and gently place it on top of the crust in the pie plate.
  8. Prepare the topping by combining the brown sugar, flour, and cinnamon in a small bowl. Add the melted butter and stir to distribute evenly and moisten the dry ingredients. Using your hands or a large spoon, place mounds of the topping on the peach pie filling, distributing evenly. Take care to leave gaps in the topping to allow steam to escape from the fruit filling as the pie bakes.
  9. Transfer the pie plate to the lined baking sheet and place in the preheated oven. Bake approximately 40-45 minutes, turning the pan halfway through the baking time to help ensure even browning. The pie is done when the filling is bubbly and the topping and crust are golden brown.
  10. Place the baking sheet on a wire rack to cool. Serve warm or at room temperature topped with a scoop of vanilla bean ice cream. Enjoy!
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Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/07/bourbon-peach-pie-with-brown-sugar-topping/

Traditions Old and New

Jennifer Burcke at 1840 Farm on The Daily Meal

A few months ago, I was asked by The Daily Meal to share the story of my oldest family recipe.  They went on to ask if I had created a dish that could become a new family tradition.  I couldn’t wait to answer both questions with a single answer:  berry pie.

A homemade berry pie has the power to transport me to my paternal grandmother’s humble kitchen.  My grandmother was a wonderful cook and baker, but pie was her specialty.  Her schwatzenberry pie was my favorite.  It would not be overstating its power to say that those berry pies forever changed my life.

My grandmother’s homemade berry pie taught me that food had the ability to feed my soul. I now know that it also holds the incredible power of transcending time and space, bringing back memories of a grandmother long gone, but known by my children who never had the opportunity to meet her in person.

Instead, they met her memory with the first bite of berry pie savored while listening to me share my fondest memories about her. Every summer, we carefully pick the schwatzenberries from our garden and look forward to the day when we have gathered enough to make the season’s first pie.

Now my love of berry pie has been shared with the world thanks to The Daily Meal.  I’m honored to be mentioned in the same story with the likes of Michael Chiarello, Carla Hall, Marc Murphy, and a collection of other chefs and bloggers who also shared their favorite dishes.

You can see the entire collection in the Kikkoman Tradition Exchange Slideshow.  The collection was assembled and used to introduce The Daily Meal‘s readers to an amazing new documentary, Make Haste Slowly: The Kikkoman Creed.

The documentary from Academy Award nominated filmmaker Lucy Walker tells the inspiring story of the Kikkoman brand.  The mini-documentary traces the evolution of a brand that was started over 300 years ago.  The film also focuses on the bold decision by The Kikkoman Company to begin producing their products in the United States in the 1970s, partnering with Midwestern farmers and local communities.

The film is beautiful and treats the subject with the respect it deserves.  I was particularly taken with the profile of Art Anderson, a retired farmer featured prominently in the film’s narrative.  I challenge you to listen to his personal story without being moved by his dedication and pride.  I was taken with his story and by the fact that he was a dairy farmer before he began his employment at Kikkoman.

Today, I am renewing the traditions of my family’s past and find myself milking our dairy goats in the quiet of our circa 1840 barn.  Apparently, I have more than one family tradition that will be continuing for several years to come.  Luckily, those traditions will ensure that we have homemade berry pie to enjoy with a fresh glass of milk at our family table.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2013/01/traditions-old-and-new/

Brandied Apple Pie with Cinnamon Sugar Topping

I love to make homemade pies from scratch.  It’s a family tradition that started with my paternal grandmother.  She was a gifted pie baker and enjoyed making pies in her tiny kitchen.  More importantly, she wanted to share those pies with the people she loved.

I was lucky enough to be one of those people.  I always knew that there would be homemade pies waiting for me when we visited.  She would proudly announce that there “might be a little pie” moments after we walked through her front door.  A little pie meant that there would be at least three pies waiting for us that she had baked earlier that day.

Ironically, I found myself making three pies earlier this week. One was for my husband and children.  The second was for my parents.  The third was for dear friends who we count as family.

I don’t say that lightly:  they have become an important part of our family.  Making them a homemade pie seemed like the perfect way to ensure that they knew just how much we love them.  If we deem you as pie worthy, believe me, you’re family.

While I might make a chocolate cake or a batch of cookies for a casual friend of acquaintance, pie is reserved for those near and dear to my heart.  It’s not because I feel that pie making is a chore.  It’s quite the contrary.  I love making pie for someone I love just as much as my Grandmother did.  Making the pie for someone I love is as much a part of my mental ingredient list as anything else in the actual recipe.

I involve my two children in my pie making sessions. They gather to help me make the crust and the filling.  I allow them to flute the edge of each pie, literally leaving their mark on the dough and making it their own.

I can only hope that they will continue the family tradition of making a homemade pie for someone they love when they are grown.  If I’m lucky, they might even make one when I come to visit.  Maybe they’ll greet me by mentioning that there “might be a little pie”.

Brandied Apple Pie with Cinnamon Sugar Topping
makes one 9 inch pie

The cinnamon sugar topping for this pie was adapted from a pie recipe in Ruth Reichl’s Comfort Me With Apples.  It develops a lovely, crunchy texture as the pie cools after baking.

To save time, I usually mix my pie crust in my food processor.  This recipe can be made in a bowl using a dough blender or a large fork.   Either way, the result will be a flaky, buttery crust that pairs deliciously with the apple filling.

1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
¼ teaspoon salt
4 ounces butter, cubed
4-6 Tablespoons ice water

1 pound apples, peeled, cored, and cut into thick slices
1 cup (192 grams) granulated sugar
2 Tablespoons tapioca
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 teaspoon lemon juice
1 Tablespoon brandy

4 Tablespoons butter
6 Tablespoons granulated sugar
6 Tablespoons all-purpose flour
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

To make the crust, place flour and salt in the bowl of a food processor.  Pulse the dry ingredients to combine.  Add the cubed butter and pulse until the butter has begun to incorporate into the flour and resembles small grains of rice.

With the motor running, add ice water one Tablespoon at a time until the dough forms a ball.  Take care not to over process the dough.  Over processing will help to develop the gluten in the flour and lead to a crust that is less flaky.  Remove the crust from the processor, shape into a flat disk, and place on a sheet of waxed paper or plastic wrap.  Refrigerate while the filling is prepared.

To prepare the apple filling, combine the apple slices, sugar, tapioca, cinnamon, lemon juice and brandy in a large bowl.  Mix gently to combine.  Set aside.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.  Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil to catch any pie filling that may bubble over during baking.  Set aside.

To make the topping, melt the butter over low heat in a small saucepan.  Add the sugar, flour, and cinnamon and stir until fully incorporated.  Remove from the heat and continue to stir until the mixture is completely smooth.  Set aside to cool.

Remove the chilled pie dough from the refrigerator.  Roll the crust into a smooth disk large enough to line the pie plate.  Rolling will be much easier if done on a well-floured surface or between two sheets of freezer paper or waxed paper.

Place the bottom crust in the pie plate, taking care not to stretch the dough.  By gently lifting the edges of the crust, the dough will naturally come to rest on the bottom of the pie plate without stretching.  Continue this technique around the perimeter of the pie plate.

Stir the prepared filling before gently placing it on top of the crust in the pie plate.  Evenly distribute the topping mixture over the apple filling using a spatula.  Alternately, the topping can be crumbled evenly over the surface of the pie using your fingers.

Place the pie on top of the prepared baking sheet and transfer to the preheated oven.  Bake for 10 minutes before reducing the temperature to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.  Continue to bake for 45 minutes or until the top crust is a beautiful, light golden brown.  Rotating the pie midway through the baking time will help to ensure that your pie is evenly browned.

Remove the pie from the oven and place on a wire rack to cool.  Serve warm or at room temperature.  Top with vanilla ice cream if desired.

To download a printable copy of this recipe, click the link below to open the PDF file.
Brandied Apple Pie with Cinnamon Sugar Topping

 

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Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/09/brandied-apple-pie-with-cinnamon-sugar-topping/