Category Archive: Chickens

New Community Chickens Post: Coop Planning

Click to read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

Coop Planning:  Five Features to Incorporate in to Your Coop

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/05/new-community-chickens-post-coop-planning/

New Community Chickens Post: The Best Breed of Chicken for Your Flock

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

The Best Breed of Chicken for Your Flock

(click to view the entire post)

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/05/new-community-chickens-post-the-best-breed-of-chicken-for-your-flock/

Who’s Watching Who?

Since our day old baby chicks arrived three weeks ago, I’ve kept our Wingscapes BirdCam busy capturing photos and videos of them in their brooding pen.  Today as I was looking through the hundreds of images captured earlier this week, I was taken with two photos of one of our Mottled Cochin Bantam chicks.

In them, she has the stage to herself and seems to be taking full advantage of the moment to pose for the camera.  Then she turns and looks at the BirdCam rather inquisitively.  It was as if she was investigating the camera as much as it was investigating her. So, judge for yourself. Who’s watching who?

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/05/whos-watching-who/

New Community Chickens Post: My Pet Chicken (and Yours)

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

My Pet Chicken (and Yours)

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/05/new-community-chickens-post-a-naturally-beautiful-celebration-2/

Nearly Wordless Wednesday – May 2, 2012

1840 Farm has twelve new residents of the feathered variety.  They arrived yesterday and I am happy to report that they are all active and well.  They spent the better part of today exploring and trying to master two very important skills:  eating and getting along with your roommates!

They are adorable and we are all enjoying watching them.  There will be daily pictures and videos to share on our Facebook page, but I wanted to give you all a glimpse of them on their first full. day living at 1840 Farm.  Here they are after we gave them all a health check this afternoon.  Moments later, they were back in their brooding pen warming up and exploring their surroundings.

Stay tuned – there will be an unending supply of chick pictures to share!

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/05/nearly-wordless-wednesday-may-2-2012/

New Community Chickens Post: A Naturally Beautiful Celebration

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

A Naturally Beautiful Celebration

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/04/new-community-chickens-post-a-naturally-beautiful-celebration/

New Community Chickens Post: Welcome to a Year in the Life at 1840 Farm

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

Welcome to a Year in the Life at 1840 Farm


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/03/new-community-chickens-post-welcome-to-a-year-in-the-life-at-1840-farm/

New Community Chickens Post: Cue the Sun (or a Compact Fluorescent Light Bulb)

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:

Cue the Sun (or a Compact Fluorescent Light Bulb)

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2012/01/new-community-chickens-post-the-birth-of-a-new-season-2/

Purina FLIP Camera Giveaway

During the past two months, 1840 Farm has been proud to participate in the Purina 60 Day See the Difference Challenge.  I was given the incredible opportunity to share my experience with the readers of the Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine Community Chickens forum.  In fact, I just published the final post regarding the challenge to the forum this morning:

The Challenge Remains

by Jennifer Burcke

I learned a lot during the See the Difference Challenge.  We happily solved our dilemma of how to supplement our chicken’s calcium intake without the use of oyster shell which might trigger my son’s shellfish allergy.  By feeding our heritage breed hens the Purina Layena Sunfresh feed, we enjoyed sixty days of egg collecting without finding even one broken shell.

While improving the strength of the eggs produced in our coop was reward enough, Purina also provided me with a FLIP camera to help document our participation in the Challenge.  I was surprised by how easy the camera was to use and find myself using it on a regular basis here on our farm.  In fact, I have posted many videos of our hens and our baby goat kids on FaceBook and Twitter for readers to enjoy.

Here’s the best news for you, Dear Reader.  Purina also provided me with a FLIP camera to give away to one lucky reader.  I will randomly select a reader on Monday, November 21, 2011.  The winner will be notified via Email and announced to all of my readers via FaceBook, Twitter, the Community Chickens forum, and on this blog.

If you would like to enter the drawing, simply comment on this post below.  Be sure to include your Email address so that I can contact you if you are chosen as the lucky winner.

Good luck to all who enter and thank you Purina for allowing us to participate in the 60 Day See the Difference Challenge!

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2011/11/purina-flip-camera-giveaway/

New Community Chickens Post: The Birth of a New Season

Read my latest post on the Community Chickens  forum from the publishers of Mother Earth News and Grit Magazine:


The Birth of a New Season

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2011/10/new-community-chickens-post-the-birth-of-a-new-season/

And Then There Were Seven

I  have a wide variety of duties here at 1840 Farm.  I am a wife, mother, cook, housekeeper, gardener, handyman, appliance repairman, etc.  Luckily, I’ve never had to be an undertaker.  Well, until a few days ago.

We just added eight baby chicksto our farm.  It was a big step, but as soon as they arrived, we jumped right into chicken farming.  My kids took their new responsibilities very seriously.  My daughter has been spotted more than once cleaning out the brooding box and changing their water without the painful prompting that only a mother can apply.

My son helps in his own preschool way.  That is to say that he fills up their feeder and almost manages to get some food into the feeder instead of onto the bottom floor of the brooding box.  Now if I could just get them to feed the dog.  Oh well, I mustn’t be greedy.

The first day with the chicks was all fun and games.  We checked on them every few hours and laughed at how funny they were.  It was like watching bobbleheads move around the brooder.  They were unsteady on their feet and didn’t know quite what to make of life.  They were adorable.  It was great entertainment.

Then we noticed that one of the chicks seemed a little off.  While they were all sleepy from their long journey to the farm, this one seemed not only sleepy, but lethargic.  She didn’t travel with the rest of the flock.  She stayed under the heat lamp while they explored their new surroundings.  When I picked her up, sometimes she didn’t have the strength to open her eyes.

So, I did what any modern-day farmer would do.  I went straight to the Internet.  I searched.  I read.  I only came up with one option:  feed the chick sugar-water with a syringe.  I have to be honest and say that I never imagined myself standing in the garage after midnight doling out the elixir of life by hand to a sickly animal.  I just didn’t.  Not that I’m not an animal lover.  Not that I don’t love a challenge.  I just never pictured myself as an avian Nurse Ratched.

But it was all for naught.  The next morning, the little chick was no longer with us.  The rest of the flock was going about their business.  They were eating and drinking and keeping each other in line.  Now it was time for me to bury the chick.  Here I go, still in my pajamas, out to the field with a shovel and the baby chick wrapped in newspaper.

It was grey and rainy out.  Good weather for undertaking, I suppose.  So, I did what I needed to do and then headed inside.  Fast forward a few rainy morning hours and it was time to tell my children before they saw it with their own eyes at the pre-breakfast chick check.  They took it surprisingly well, but with understandable questions.

The most popular question was “why?”  I didn’t have a good answer because sometimes there just isn’t one.  I reminded them that we had prepared for this before the chicks arrived.  We talked about how delicate they were and that they might not all make it.  It’s one thing to say it might happen.  It’s another to explain that it actually has.

But we were farmers now.  It was time to take a deep breath, grab our boots and head out to check on our remaining charges.  We did and my children were happy to see that the remaining seven chicks were all very active.  They were going on with their day.  Somehow they knew that they had to.  In nature, there is no time for mourning because it isn’t productive for an animal to stop their daily quest for survival to dwell on the past.  They were living in the moment and marching forward.  If the seven of them wanted to survive, they had to.  It wasn’t a choice.  It was necessity.

I hadn’t intended to teach my children a life lesson when we ordered eight baby chicks for the farm.  I should have known better.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2010/09/and-then-there-were-seven/

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