Jennifer Burcke

Author's details

Name: Jennifer Burcke
Date registered: July 12, 2012
URL: http://www.1840farm.com

Biography

Jennifer Burcke is a writer and fifth generation New England farmer who lives with three generations of her family at 1840 Farm in New Hampshire. She shares their journey on her blog at www.1840farm.com.

Latest posts

  1. Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard — July 14, 2017
  2. Farmhouse Coleslaw — June 30, 2017
  3. Brown Sugar Dry Spice Rub — June 17, 2017
  4. Raspberry Rhubarb Curd — May 29, 2017
  5. Memorial Day 2017 — May 27, 2017

Most commented posts

  1. 2014 Heirloom Seed Collection from 1840 Farm and Fresh Eggs Daily — 93 comments
  2. The Best Way to Store Fresh Bread — 49 comments
  3. 1840 Farm and The Fresh Eggs Daily Blog Tour — 39 comments
  4. Rhubarb and Strawberry Brown Butter Crumble Cake — 21 comments
  5. A Backyard Rabbit Giveaway — 21 comments

Author's posts listings

Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard

Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard BannerIt’s difficult not to fall in love with ice cream.  It’s so delicious and such a welcome treat on a warm summer day. Ice cream is certainly delicious, but you haven’t lived until you have been treated to frozen custard.  The difference may seem subtle on paper, but one taste and you’ll understand the distinction between the two. At our house, vanilla custard almost always takes the place of standard vanilla ice cream.  Once we tasted frozen custard made with our hens’ fresh eggs, there was simply no going back.

So, what’s the difference between ice cream and frozen custard?  To begin with, ice cream is a frozen concoction that does not necessarily contain eggs.  In fact, Philadelphia style ice cream specifically excludes them.  During our egg free years due to a food allergy, Philadelphia style ice cream was our go to.  Those simple recipes that were intentionally egg free allowed us to make batch after batch of homemade ice cream that tasted delicious and didn’t carry with it the potential of causing an allergic reaction.

According to the USDA, something labeled “ice cream” should contain at least 20 percent milk solids and 10 percent milk fat by weight.  Premium brands tend to include a higher percentage of fat, using a combination of milk and cream to deliver a smooth texture.  Eggs can be used, but they are not required and often omitted as they add steps to the ice cream making process and increase the cost to produce each batch.

Frozen custard relies on egg yolks to deliver a velvety texture and richer flavor.  The lecithin in the yolks naturally emulsifies the custard, creating a creamier texture.  The USDA requires food billed as “frozen custard” to contain at least 1.4 percent egg yolk by weight.  Some brands include more than required and deliver a richer, fuller flavor thanks to the extra yolks.

It’s hard for me to argue against adding egg yolks to your frozen concoction during this time of year.  Our chickens and ducks are leaving us full nests every day and making batches of frozen custard seems like a great way to enjoy our fresh eggs and create a delicious treat for dessert that doesn’t heat up the farmhouse by baking in the oven.  On a warm summer’s day, nothing seems quite as decadent as a scoop of creamy, delicious homemade custard made with fresh eggs collected from our own hens.

Over the years, I have made several different types of ice cream and custard.  When it came to vanilla bean frozen custard, I had used a few recipes, but we didn’t have a clear favorite.  This year, I decided that with a mountain of fresh chicken and duck eggs accumulating in the farmhouse kitchen, it was high time to develop a recipe we would love.

I gathered the four recipes I had tried in the past and then went in search of a few new ones to consider.  They were all remarkably similar combinations of cream, egg yolks, sugar, and vanilla.  I tried a few of them and set my family to the task of tasting the different variations and registering their opinions about the taste and texture.  Each batch was slightly different.  They were all yummy, but there wasn’t a clear front runner. 

Luckily, I remembered that a book in my cookbook collection had a custard recipe that Thomas Jefferson had written.  While it had been years since I had read the book, that recipe stuck with me.  It was hard to forget the fact that Thomas Jefferson had the distinction of being the first American to write a recipe for ice cream.  In 1780, he detailed the ingredients and the steps required in his day to create vanilla Jefferson Ice Cream Recipebean ice cream.  While he called it ice cream, the recipe is in fact custard due to the high number of egg yolks in the batch.  Thanks to Thomas Jefferson, I made a few changes to my own recipe and gathered the ingredients to make the next batch.

Jefferson references using “2 bottles of good cream, 6 yolks of eggs, 1 ½ pounds sugar, and a stick of vanilla” in his recipe.  I decided to use 6 yolks which was one more than I had used in any of my recipes.  With regard to the sugar, I didn’t need nearly as much.  Instead of using all heavy cream, I used a mixture of heavy cream, whipping cream, and half and half.  I hoped that the result would be just as decadent and delicious but with a slightly lighter, creamier feel. 

We watched as this batch churned away in our ice cream maker.  As it began to freeze and come together, we could no longer resist the urge to dip a spoon in to grab a taste.  One taste was all it took for us to decide that this version was a showstopper.  We had found our perfect vanilla bean frozen custard recipe.

Since then, I have made this recipe countless times.  It always comes together beautifully and delivers a delicious, creamy, rich frozen treat that our family just loves.  With each batch, I can’t help but marvel at the fact that the recipe I am making in our farmhouse kitchen isn’t much different from the recipe Jefferson wrote down nearly 250 years ago.  I guess that this delicious custard recipe proves that sometimes you simply can’t improve upon perfection.

Vanilla Bean Frozen Custard
If you don’t have a vanilla bean on hand, don’t let that deter you from making a batch of this frozen custard. You can omit the vanilla bean and still make delicious vanilla custard thanks to the vanilla extract. Sure, the resulting custard will be missing the pretty vanilla bean flecks and have a slightly less pronounced vanilla flavor, but it will still taste amazing. I like to use our duck’s eggs in this recipe as they have enormous, rich yolks that impart a beautiful pale yellow color to the finished custard. A version made with fresh chicken eggs is equally delicious and no less beautiful. I reserve the whites and scramble them as a special treat for Penny Lane.
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Ingredients
  1. 6 large egg yolks
  2. 1 ½ cups half and half
  3. 1 cup granulated sugar
  4. 1 vanilla bean, split
  5. 1 pinch salt
  6. ¾ cup heavy cream
  7. ¾ cup whipping cream
  8. 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
Instructions
  1. Separate the eggs, placing the yolks in a medium bowl. Whisk them briskly until they thicken slightly.
  2. In a medium saucepan, heat the half and half, sugar, vanilla bean, and salt over medium-low heat, stirring frequently to encourage the sugar to fully dissolve into the liquid. Remove the pan from the heat once the liquid is nearly ready to come to a simmer.
  3. Temper the egg yolks by slowly drizzling the warm half and half mixture into the yolks, whisking constantly to prevent the eggs from scrambling. Whisk briskly to combine before transferring the mixture back to the saucepan.
  4. Place the saucepan over medium-low heat. Whisk as the mixture warms to keep the custard from scorching as it cooks. The custard will thicken as it warms, combing to a pudding like consistency when finished. The properly thickened custard will coat the back of a spoon.
  5. Remove the pan from the heat. Place a fine mesh strainer or colander lined with cheesecloth over a large bowl. Transfer the warm custard to the strainer and allow it to pass through to the bowl beneath. This will ensure that the custard is completely smooth and does not contain any undissolved grains of sugar or cooked egg. Continue until all of the custard has been strained.
  6. Add the heavy cream, whipping cream, and vanilla extract to the bowl. Whisk to combine all of the ingredients. Chill the custard base until it is completely cooled. Attempting to churn ice cream or custard before the mixture is completely chilled will result in a custard with a grainy texture. If you can, allow the custard to cool overnight in the refrigerator. You can also place the bowl of custard inside a larger bowl filled with ice water to hasten the cooling by several hours.
  7. After the base has cooled completely, process it in your ice cream freezer according to the manufacturer’s directions. Remove the frozen custard from the machine and place it in a freezer safe container. Freeze until firm and enjoy every single bite!
Notes
  1. If you don’t have a vanilla bean on hand, don’t let that deter you from making a batch of this frozen custard. You can omit the vanilla bean and still make delicious vanilla custard thanks to the vanilla extract. Sure, the resulting custard will be missing the pretty vanilla bean flecks and have a slightly less pronounced vanilla flavor, but it will still taste amazing.
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Farmhouse Coleslaw

Farmhouse Coleslaw BannerI love cabbage.  I like it raw.  I like it cooked, especially in the traditional German dishes my grandmother made when I was a child.  Hand me a soft Bierock filled with seasoned ground beef and sautéed cabbage and prepare for me to get misty at the thought of the version she made when I was young.

Ironically, I don’t like most preparations of coleslaw.  As much as I love cabbage, I just don’t usually enjoy the dressing portion of a traditional slaw as much as I would like.  Fortunately, preparing a homemade version is simple and the ingredients can easily be tailored to your family’s taste.

When I decided to create my own version at home, I filled it with my favorite fresh flavors.  Since then, this slaw has become a family favorite here at the farmhouse.  It’s delicious served with burgers, sandwiches, or grilled sausages.  It also makes a great topping for tacos.

I love to include apples in this slaw.  They add such a delicious sweetness to pair with the earthy cabbage.  Their crisp flesh is also a nice texture to include in the mix.  To keep the apples from browning, I used to sprinkle a little apple cider vinegar on them before adding them to the slaw.  Then I had the wild idea to use a bit of the pickle brine I always have on hand in the refrigerator from our batches of Spicy Ginger and Garlic Quick Pickles.  The brine works just as well to prevent browning and also adds a lovely flavor to the slaw.  You can use any acidic brine you might have lingering in the fridge or simple add a bit of lemon juice or vinegar to the apples with equally good results.

This slaw is a great side dish during the warm summer months.  While the main course is cooking on the grill, I make a batch of this slaw and dinner is ready without heating up the farmhouse.  The next night, any leftovers can be served after a gentle toss to redistribute the components.  The colors of the two colors of cabbage and apples are so beautiful on the plate and the crisp texture and flavors are sure to be a hit at your dinner table.

Farmhouse Coleslaw
I love to include apples in this slaw. They add such a delicious sweetness to pair with the earthy cabbage. Their crisp flesh is also a nice texture to include in the mix. To keep the apples from browning, I used to sprinkle a little apple cider vinegar on them before adding them to the slaw. Then I had the wild idea to use a bit of the pickle brine I always have on hand in the refrigerator from our batches of Spicy Ginger and Garlic Quick Pickles. The brine works just as well to prevent browning and also adds a lovely flavor to the slaw. You can use any acidic brine you might have lingering in the fridge or simple add a bit of lemon juice or vinegar to the apples with equally good results. I like to cut the apples into matchstick sized pieces and use a vegetable peeler to create thin ribbons of carrot. You can cut the fruit and vegetables into any size and shape of bite sized pieces based on your preference. I use Head Country spice seasoning blends in my slaw. I have also used other grill blends and even taco seasoning blend when it was all that I had on hand. Your favorite blend of grilling or seasoning spices will be delicious. Add more seasoning if needed and a pinch of cayenne pepper if you’d like a little extra spice.
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Ingredients
  1. ¼ cup mayonnaise
  2. 1 Tablespoon seasoning blend
  3. 1 green apple
  4. 1 red apple
  5. ½ cup pickle brine
  6. 2 large carrots
  7. 6 radishes
  8. ½ head green cabbage
  9. ½ head purple cabbage
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl, whisk together mayonnaise and 1 Tablespoon of your favorite seasoning blend.
  2. Slice the apples into ½ thick slices. Cut each slice into matchstick shaped pieces, omitting the core. Add the apple pieces and pickle brine to a small bowl and toss gently to coat. Allow the apples to remain in the brine as you prepare the other ingredients.
  3. Using a vegetable peeler, peel the carrots. Use the peeler to cut ribbons from the peeled carrots. Add the carrots to the large bowl with the seasoned mayonnaise. Thinly slice the radishes and add them to the bowl.
  4. Prepare the cabbage by cutting each head into quarters. Remove the core of the cabbage before slicing each quarter into thin slices. You can also grate the cabbage if you prefer. Add all of the cabbage to the large bowl. Using a slotted spoon, remove the apple pieces from their brine and add to the large bowl. Reserve the brine.
  5. Toss the slaw gently to coat with the seasoned mayonnaise. Taste for seasoning. Add more seasoning if desired and a bit of the brine if needed to thin the mayonnaise and coat the components. Serve cold and sprinkle with the seasoning mix before serving if desired.
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Brown Sugar Dry Spice Rub

Brown Sugar Dry Spice Rub BannerThe warm weather months are in short supply here in New England.  We try to make the most of them, packing as many outdoor projects and activities as we can into the months of the year when our landscape isn’t covered in a thick blanket of snow.

Between gardening, tending to our animals, working on projects, and trying to find time to just enjoy the sunny days, time often runs short.  It’s not uncommon for us to come inside from a long day of work to then ask the important question:  “What’s for dinner?”

When prep time is short and the temperature is warm, dinner is often cooked on the grill.  On a night when we don’t want to warm up the farmhouse by cooking in the kitchen, the backyard’s grill is a much more appealing option.

Dry rubs are a great way to add flavor to whatever you’re cooking on the grill.  They don’t require hours of resting time like liquid marinades do in order to impart their flavor to the meat.  If you have the luxury of time, dry rubs can be allowed to flavor the meat for a few hours before cooking.  I find that they deliver great flavor even when applied minutes before grilling.

I keep a Mason jar of this spice rub on hand in the pantry so that we can season cuts of chicken, pork, or beef and have them on the grill in minutes.  It’s a delicious blend that appeals to everyone in our family.  The brown sugar caramelizes over the heat and the cornstarch creates a light crust which helps to prevent moisture from escaping from the meat as it cooks.

The result is a delicious dinner that comes together quickly and cooks beautifully on the grill.  During the warm summer months, this spice rub becomes part of our dinner plans at least once a week.  It’s the taste of our summer.  I hope that you’ll make it a part of yours!

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

Brown Sugar Dry Spice Rub
I mix up a double batch of this spice mix and keep it in a Mason jar so that it is at the ready all summer long. The spices can be adjusted based on your taste preference. When we want something spicy, I often add a bit of cayenne pepper to the mix. I haven’t found anything that isn’t more delicious with this spice rub sprinkled liberally on it!
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Ingredients
  1. ¼ cup brown sugar
  2. 1 Tablespoon cornstarch
  3. 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  4. 1 teaspoon salt
  5. 1 teaspoon black pepper
  6. 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  7. 1 teaspoon chili powder
  8. 1 teaspoon thyme
Instructions
  1. Combine all the ingredients in a container with a tight fitting lid. Fasten the lid on the container and shake to mix. This spice mix can be kept in a lidded container in the pantry indefinitely.
  2. Before grilling, sprinkle this spice mix liberally over chicken, pork, or beef. Grill as usual and enjoy!
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Raspberry Rhubarb Curd

Raspberry Rhubarb Curd SquareA few weeks ago, I shared my recipe for Creamy Lemon Curd.  It’s a staple here during the spring when we’re all craving the light, crisp flavor of fresh fruit months before our New England gardens will have anything ready to harvest. 

This is also the time of year that we begin evaluating what we have on hand from last year’s harvest.  It’s time to start using the last of the pantry and freezer’s stores of raspberries, rhubarb, and heirloom tomatoes.  Last year’s banner crops of raspberries and rhubarb gave us plenty to enjoy over the winter with enough to carry us right into this year’s harvest.

So, when I made fresh pound cake a few weeks ago, I wondered if I could create a raspberry rhubarb curd to serve with it.  I knew that I could make a delicious raspberry rhubarb simple syrup because we use one all summer long to flavor lemonade and cocktails.  I also knew that I had some of that very syrup in the refrigerator, saving me a step.

In a few minutes, I had a pot of that syrup bubbling along, thickening into a gorgeous smooth curd.  It was sweet with just the right hint of tartness.  It was a beautiful orchid purple color.

Since making this curd, it has become even more popular here at the farmhouse than our Creamy Lemon Curd.  We love to spoon it over slices of Old Fashioned Pound Cake, Daffodil Cake, or on our homemade Lemon Drop Cookies.  It’s as beautiful as it is delicious.  I hope that your family will enjoy it as much as we do!

Raspberry Rhubarb Curd
I keep a jar of fresh raspberry rhubarb syrup on hand in the refrigerator during the spring and summer. We use that beautiful syrup to flavor lemonades and cocktails. When I have plenty of the syrup on hand, I simply use 1 cup of that syrup to make this curd. If not, I make a fresh batch of syrup, using 1 cup to make curd and keeping the rest on hand in the refrigerator.
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For the Raspberry Rhubarb Syrup
  1. 10 ounces raspberries, fresh or frozen
  2. 6 ounces sliced rhubarb stalks, fresh or frozen
  3. 1 cup water
  4. 1 cup granulated sugar
  5. 1 Tablespoon lemon juice
For the Curd
  1. 1 cup raspberry rhubarb syrup
  2. 2 Tablespoons lemon juice
  3. 4 large eggs
  4. pinch of salt
  5. 2 sticks (16 Tablespoons) butter
For the Raspberry Rhubarb Syrup
  1. Place all of the ingredients in a medium saucepan placed over medium heat. Stir gently to combine the ingredients. Bring the mixture to a simmer, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking.
  2. Once the mixture comes to a simmer, reduce the heat to low and simmer gently for five minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and allow to cool to room temperature.
  3. Strain the mixture through a fine sieve or a colander lined with cheesecloth to remove the fruit and seeds. Press the fruit to release all of the liquid.
  4. Transfer the strained syrup to a container with a tight fitting lid. I like to store my homemade syrups in glass bottles with a pour spout for easy dispensing. Refrigerate until ready to use.
For the Curd
  1. Cut the butter into Tablespoon sized pieces, reserving 2 Tablespoons to be added to the curd after it is finished cooking.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the raspberry rhubarb syrup, lemon juice, eggs, and salt. Whisk gently to combine Place a medium saucepan over low heat. Add 14 Tablespoons of the butter to the pan. Once the butter melts, add the raspberry rhubarb syrup mixture and whisk to combine. Increase the heat slightly and whisk constantly until the mixture thickens. A perfectly thickened curd will be what the French would call “Nappe”.
  3. Nappe is a fancy term for the consistency a sauce reaches when it is thick enough to coat a dish without being too thick. Checking to see if a curd or custard is nappe is simple. Immerse a clean spoon into the mixture; remove the spoon, turning it so that the back of the spoon is facing you. Run a finger down the length of the spoon from the handle to the tip. If a clean path is created and the curd remains on both sides of the spoon, you have achieved nappe. If not, simply continue to cook the sauce while whisking until it thickens properly.
  4. Once the curd reaches nappe consistency, remove the pan from the heat. I like to strain my curd to into a large bowl to ensure that there are no lumps or bits of scrambled egg in the finished curd, but this step can be skipped. Add the remaining 2 Tablespoons of butter, whisking to incorporate the butter into the curd as it melts.
  5. Transfer the finished curd to a large bowl or Mason jar with a tight fitting lid. Curd can be kept in the refrigerator for one week.
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Memorial Day 2017

Memorial Day Favorites Branded

Memorial Day is the official kickoff to summer and we feel like celebrating!  We’ll be marking the holiday weekend with a few of our favorite seasonal recipes, time spent outside working in the gardens, and by doing a little something special in The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.

We’re making our Memorial Day dinner on the grill with dry aged beef or Asian pork burgers for everyone.  Those grilled burgers will be topped with each person’s favorite toppings including our homemade Spicy Ginger & Garlic Quick Pickles , Classic Sauerkraut, Kimchi, and Smoky Tomato Jam.  We’ll be serving up Farmhouse Style Onion Rings and Grilled Romaine Salad on the side topped with a lemony garlic homemade dressing.

I just made a fresh batch of our Raspberry Rhubarb Syrup using fruit from last year’s berry patch.  We’ll use that beautiful, tangy red syrup to dress up lemonade or make a warm weather favorite, the Franklin Cooler cocktail. Last year’s raspberries are pulling double duty this year.  They’ll also make the filling for dessert in a homemade Raspberry Pie

Monday morning will start off with a Strawberry Puff Pancake using the bounty of fresh eggs our hens are providing.  I can’t wait until we have fresh strawberries in our own garden to enjoy spooned over this delicious breakfast treat.  The plants are loaded with flowers, so I have my fingers crossed that we’ll have a bumper crop of red berries this year.

Happy Memorial Day from all of us here at 1840 Farm.  For those of you who have served in the military or are on active duty, please accept my heartfelt thanks for your service to our country.  To the families and friends who support those who serve, thank you for the sacrifices you make to support the bravest Americans among us.  As the flag waves on our farmer’s porch, I am forever reminded that we owe a debt of gratitude to all who serve that can never be repaid.

I hope that you have a holiday weekend spent with friends and family filled to the brim with laughter, delicious food and drink, and memories in the making.  We’ll try to do the same!


We’re celebrating the holiday weekend by doing a little something special in The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.

First, we’re marking the occasion of the one year anniversary of adding ducks to our farm by offering coupon code “QUACK” so that you can save $5.00 off any purchase (yes, that even includes custom orders)!  Second, we’re adding in a free handmade 4″ coaster sized trivet to every order we send out.  And last but not least, we’re making a donation to Red Nose Day along with our friends from Good Dirt and Gingham Creative.  Red Nose Day is an annual event to raise awareness and funds to help end childhood poverty around the world.  Together, we can help make a difference in the lives of children all over the world.

Here’s a peek at what’s available in our shop:

Shop SS 052717

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Egg Drop Soup

Egg Drop Soup SquareIt’s egg season here, so I am forever looking for ways both new and old to use our seemingly unending supply of fresh eggs.  This weekend, it was unseasonably chilly and rainy outside.  We broke out our winter clothes and turned on the pellet stove to keep cozy.  Even with the fire burning, we were still looking for ways to warm up. 

With dinnertime looming, soup seemed like a great idea.  Yet, I didn’t have the luxury of a day’s time to simmer soup on the stove for hours in order to create a soup with the deep and delicious flavor I wanted.  I also hadn’t planned on making soup when I made my weekly trip to the grocery store, so I was limited to the ingredients I had on hand in the refrigerator and pantry.

After a quick survey of our options, it was clear that egg drop soup was the winner.  I had all of the ingredients on hand and I knew that I could create a delicious soup with complex flavors that would bring comfort with every spoonful.  Best of all, I could use a few of those fresh eggs resting on the counter in our egg basket!

 

Egg Drop Soup
I make this soup using our homemade bone broth. If you don’t have bone broth on hand, a high quality stock or broth may be substituted.
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Ingredients
  1. 6 cups chicken bone broth or stock
  2. ½ teaspoon fresh ginger root, grated
  3. 2 Tablespoons soy sauce
  4. 4 Tablespoons cornstarch
  5. ¼ cup chicken bone broth or stock
  6. ¼ teaspoon white pepper
  7. salt to taste
  8. 3 large eggs, beaten
  9. 2 Tablespoons chives or green onion, sliced finely
  10. sriracha and soy sauce for serving
Instructions
  1. In a large pot, combine the broth, ginger, and soy sauce. Bring to a gentle simmer. In a small bowl, combine the cornstarch and ¼ cup broth, stirring until smooth. Add the cornstarch mixture to the simmering broth, stirring or whisking to combine. After a few minutes of simmering, the broth will take on a velvety texture, thickening slightly.
  2. In a small bowl, beat the three eggs until light and frothy. Using a spoon or ladle, stir the broth to create movement in the pan. As the broth is moving, drizzle the beaten egg into the broth. The egg will immediately begin to cook and form delicate ribbons in the broth. Continue until all of the egg has been added. Remove the pan from the heat.
  3. Add the chives or green onion to the soup and stir to combine. Taste for seasoning, adding more salt and white pepper to your liking. Ladle into serving bowls and garnish with a drizzle of soy sauce and sriracha if desired. Enjoy!
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Farmhouse Style Onion Rings

Farmhouse Style Onion Rings at 1840 FarmOnion rings seem like such a simple thing, yet so many onion rings are pedestrian at best.  A great onion ring perfectly combines the earthy flavor of the onion with a seasoned coating, the soft texture of the cooked onion with the crunchy breading.  I find that very few onion rings live up to that promise.  Luckily, the perfect onion ring can easily be created at home in your own kitchen.

With humble ingredients and a deep pot or deep fryer, you can create the most delicious onion rings I have ever tasted. You can adjust the seasoning to your liking, use beer to replace the sparkling water if you prefer, and make the crisp and delicious onion ring of your dreams. 

No matter how many times I make these onion rings, the family just can’t seem to get enough of them.  Burger night seems to be requested even more frequently than before in the hopes that I’ll make a batch of these onion rings to serve alongside.  Once you’ve made a batch of these golden, crunchy onion rings, you’ll wonder how you could possibly have burger night without them!

 

Farmhouse Style Onion Rings
I find that large, slightly flattened yellow onions produce the best size onion rings for frying. Any onion will do, but choosing a large onion will allow you to create enough onion rings for a crowd without having to batter and fry as many individual rings as a smaller onion will produce. The sparkling water can be replaced with an equal measurement of your favorite beer to create beer battered onion rings.
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For the Onions
  1. 2 extra-large yellow onions (weighing about a pound each)
  2. 1 cup All-purpose flour
For the Batter
  1. 2 cups All-purpose flour
  2. 1 cup cornstarch
  3. 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  4. 2 teaspoons onion powder
  5. 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  6. 4 teaspoons salt
  7. 2 teaspoons sugar
  8. 1 cup buttermilk
  9. 2 cups sparkling water
  10. 1 large egg
For Frying and Finishing
  1. 4-6 cups frying oil (or more as needed for your chosen frying vessel)
  2. salt to season the hot onion rings
Instructions
  1. Slice the onions crosswise into ½ to ¾ inch thick slices. Separate each slice into individual rings. Place the rings in a large bowl before sprinkling with 1 cup of flour. Gently toss the rings to coat with the flour without breaking. Allow the rings to rest in the flour for at least 30 minutes. This process will help to dry the exterior surface of the onion and allow the batter to adhere firmly to the onion.
  2. When you are ready to prepare the onion rings, preheat the oven to 250 degrees Fahrenheit. Set cooling rack over a baking sheet. This will provide a perfect resting place for the onion rings as you fry successive batches. Line a small tray or baking pan with a clean tea towel. The small tray will provide you with a safe and efficient way to transfer the cooked onion rings to the oven and the towel will absorb any excess oil.
  3. Begin heating your frying oil to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Choose a deep pot that will allow for the oil to expand as the onions rings are fried. Take care to not overfill the pot with oil as it will expand as the rings are fried.
  4. As the oil and oven come up to temperature, mix the batter. In a large bowl, combine the 2 cups of flour, cornstarch, seasonings, buttermilk, sparkling water (or beer), and egg. Whisk until smooth. The batter should resemble a thin pancake batter.
  5. Add several rings to the batter, turning them to coat completely. Transfer the battered onion rings to the hot oil, taking care not to splash the oil out of the vessel and without overcrowding. Move the onion rings slightly to ensure that they do not stick to each other or the sides of the pan. Fry each batch for 3-4 minutes, turning at least once to ensure that they are an even golden brown.
  6. Remove the onion rings from the hot oil carefully to the towel lined pan. Sprinkle with salt and transfer to the wire rack in the warm oven. Repeat the process until all of the rings have been fried and seasoned. Serve hot.
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Creamy Lemon Curd

Creamy Lemon Curd BrandedThere’s something about lemon curd that I just love.  I’ll confess that I’m not a huge fan of everything lemony, but for some inexplicable reason I adore lemon curd.  I love the burst of bright citrusy flavor as much as I enjoy the creamy texture.  It just seems to taste of spring and you can count on me to make it every year when winter gives way to warmer weather and the snow finally begins to melt away.

Curd is simple to make and adds a touch of decadence to scones, pound cake, sponge cake, or as a base filling for berry tarts and tartlets.  With its gorgeous yellow color and satiny smooth appearance, it is as beautiful as it is delicious.

Take your time when making curd just as you would when making custard.  The process is simple, but rushing the thickening process can result in a grainy curd or even tiny bits of scrambled egg.  Instead, spend a few more minutes bringing the liquid to a simmer over low to medium heat, whisking constantly.  The reward will be a perfectly smooth curd that will be well worth a few extra minutes at the stove.

Creamy Lemon Curd
Yields 2
During Meyer Lemon season, I love to make this recipe using Meyer Lemons which tend to be a bit sweeter and less acidic than traditional lemons. When I do, I simply reduce the sugar to a scant cup and proceed as usual. The resulting curd has a bit more of an orange undertone from the color of the Meyer Lemons, but otherwise tastes amazingly similar.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
  2. 1 Tablespoon finely grated lemon zest
  3. 1 ¼ cup sugar
  4. 4 large eggs
  5. pinch of salt
  6. 2 sticks (16 Tablespoons) butter
Instructions
  1. Cut the butter into Tablespoon sized pieces, reserving 2 Tablespoons to be added to the curd after it is finished cooking.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the lemon juice, zest, sugar, eggs, and salt. Whisk gently to combine Place a medium saucepan over low heat. Add 14 Tablespoons of the butter to the pan. Once the butter melts, add the lemon juice mixture and whisk to combine. Increase the heat slightly and whisk constantly until the mixture thickens. A perfectly thickened curd will be what the French would call “Nappe”.
  3. Nappe is a fancy term for the consistency a sauce reaches when it is thick enough to coat a dish without being too thick. Checking to see if a curd or custard is nappe is simple. Immerse a clean spoon into the mixture; remove the spoon, turning it so that the back of the spoon is facing you. Run a finger down the length of the spoon from the handle to the tip. If a clean path is created and the curd remains on both sides of the spoon, you have achieved nappe. If not, simply continue to cook the sauce while whisking until it thickens properly.
  4. Once the curd reaches nappe consistency, remove the pan from the heat. I like to strain my curd to into a large bowl to ensure that there are no lumps or bits of scrambled egg in the finished curd, but this step can be skipped. Add the remaining 2 Tablespoons of butter, whisking to incorporate the butter into the curd as it melts.
  5. Transfer the finished curd to a large bowl or Mason jar with a tight fitting lid. Curd can be kept in the refrigerator for one week.
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Old Fashioned Pound Cake

Old Fashioned Pound Cake SquarePound cake is the simplest of recipes yet creates something that seems extravagant, rich, and delicious.  The recipe is simple purely out of necessity.  Pound cake dates back to Britain in the early 1700s.  At that time, many citizens couldn’t read and write, so the recipe needed to be easy to remember and pass down orally.

Pound cake in that era was literally a cake made from one pound each of butter, sugar, eggs, and flour.   As far as recipes go, you can’t create a recipe any easier to remember than that.  The cake included no leavening agents, relying on fresh eggs instead.  The resulting cake was often very dense, but its easy preparation and lengthy shelf life ensured that this recipe would live on.

Over the years, the recipe has changed slightly in order to create a lighter cake with a more balanced flavor.  Today’s pound cake no longer includes one pound of each ingredient, but it does stay true to the original intent.  This recipe is simple, includes no leavening agents, and tastes as good four days later as it does the first day it is made.  The very best attributes of pound cake have lived on for centuries, a true testament to the delicious nature of pound cake.

Since we became chicken keepers, and later duck keepers, I find myself looking for recipes that celebrate the fresh eggs we collect from the coop and duck house each day.  During spring, those eggs abound and I find myself reaching for the recipes in my collection that use a good number of them.  I have found that eight eggs is the ideal amount for this cake, giving it a beautiful yellow color from our girl’s fresh eggs and a lovely texture.  When I decide to make a batch of fresh lemon curd to serve alongside this cake, I can put a full dozen of our fresh eggs to delicious use.

I like to use a homemade cake flour substitute for most cakes, including this one.  Cake flour is difficult for me to purchase at the store due to our family’s food allergies.  Luckily, I’ve learned that a combination of All-purpose flour and cornstarch from our pantry deliver the same qualities as store bought cake flour.  As an added bonus, I don’t have to keep another specialty flour on hand.

To me, this cake is a harbinger of spring, a celebration of egg season, and a wonderful way to share a beautiful and a delicious old fashioned treat with friends and family.  I’m willing to bet that this recipe will live on in your baking arsenal for years to come just as it has endured in mine.

Old Fashioned Pound Cake
Serves 10
This cake is the perfect way to celebrate spring’s bounty of fresh eggs from our flock of chickens and ducks. I find that the texture is even better when I use my homemade cake flour mix of All-purpose flour and cornstarch. If you prefer, you can use 3 cups of All-purpose flour or store bought cake flour with delicious results.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 ½ cups All-purpose flour
  2. ½ cup cornstarch
  3. ¾ teaspoon salt
  4. 2 sticks butter, softened
  5. 3 cups sugar
  6. 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  7. 8 large eggs, at room temperature
  8. 1 cup heavy cream
Instructions
  1. Position an oven rack in the middle of the oven. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Butter a Bundt or tube pan and dust lightly with flour, tapping to knock any excess flour out of the pan. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, cornstarch, and salt.
  2. Using a stand mixer or sturdy hand mixer, cream the butter and sugar at medium speed. Add the vanilla extract and increase the speed to high, beating for 5 minutes if using a stand mixer or 8 minutes if using a hand mixer. The increased mixing time will help to incorporate air into the mix, lightening the texture of the cake. The mixture should be pale yellow and fluffy when finished.
  3. Add the eggs one or two at a time, beating on medium speed after each addition to fully incorporate. Scrape down the sides of the bowl before adding approximately half of the dry ingredients. Mix on low speed just until the flour has been incorporated. Add the heavy cream and mix on low speed until well mixed. Add the remaining flour and mix on low speed just until the batter is smooth and the dry ingredients have been fully incorporated.
  4. Transfer the batter to the prepared pan. Rap the pan on the counter to help release air bubbles and create a more even texture in the finished cake. Transfer the pan to the warm oven. Bake for 60 – 75 minutes until the surface of the cake is a beautiful golden brown and a toothpick or skewer inserted into the middle of the cake comes out clean or with small crumbs attached.
  5. Remove the cake from the oven to a wire rack to cool. After 15 minutes, invert the pan onto the wire rack, remove the cake from the pan, and allow to cool completely. Serve warm or at room temperature with lemon curd or whipped cream and fresh berries.
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Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars with Nut Free Skippers

Chocolate Chip Cookie Bar BrandedFor me, there are few foods more comforting than a warm chocolate chip cookie.  My family feels the same way, so our Farmhouse Kitchen Chocolate Chip Cookies are a common sight cooling on the kitchen counter.  We never seem to tire of them.  I can perk up any day by adding a batch of chocolate chip cookies to them.

It doesn’t take long to make a batch of chocolate chip cookie dough, but portioning the individual cookies, baking them, and allowing them too cool before loading up the baking sheets again does take time.  Granted, it’s time well spent and work that ends with a pile of delicious cookies.  So, I’m happy to make individual cookies with time allows.

Some days, I am short on time, yet we still want to enjoy that delicious flavor of a chocolate chip cookie.  On those days, I put away the baking sheets and bake one pan of cookie bars instead.  The entire batch of dough fits beautifully in a 9×9 baking pan and the cookie bars are baking in the oven in minutes.

To up the flavor, I like to add a little something extra to the top of the bars just before placing them in the oven.  We live and bake around nut allergies here at the farmhouse.  It’s been a decade since we were able to enjoy an M&M candy or a cookie studded with M&M candies because they aren’t an allergy safe option for us. Luckily, we can enjoy the same fun flavor and crunch with Vermont Nut Free’s Skippers without any need to worry about an allergic reaction.  They deliver the same delicious flavor, the same chocolatey center covered in a crispy layer of candy coating.

Vermont Nut Free’s products are all 100% peanut and tree nut free, so we’re big fans.  Their products are so delicious and my go to for baking chocolates, cocoa powder, and these Skippers which have been a family favorite for years. If you don’t have nut allergies to contend with, you can substitute your favorite baking candies or chips. 

No matter how you choose to flavor your pan of cookie bars, I’m willing to bet that a warm square will end your day on a comforting and delicious note.  If you choose to add a scoop of vanilla ice cream to the mix, your week will be made!

 

Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars with Nut Free Skippers
We live and eat around nut allergies here in the farmhouse. We love using Vermont Nut Free's baking products and use their semi-sweet chocolate chips and Skippers candies in this recipe. If you don't have nut allergies to contend with, simply substitute your favorite baking chips and add-ins for an equally delicious cookie bar.
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Ingredients
  1. 1 cup (8 ounces) butter, softened and cubed
  2. 1 cup granulated sugar
  3. 1 cup brown sugar
  4. 2 large eggs
  5. 1 Tablespoon vanilla extract
  6. 2 ½ cups All-purpose flour
  7. 1 teaspoon salt
  8. ½ teaspoon baking powder
  9. ½ teaspoon baking soda
  10. 8 ounces (2 generous cups) chocolate chips
  11. 2 ounces (a generous handful) Skippers candies or your favorite cookie add-in
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees Fahrenheit and position an oven rack in the middle of your oven. Line a 9x9 baking pan with a sheet of parchment paper if desired.
  2. Place the cubed butter in the bowl of your mixer fitted with a paddle or dough beaters. Mix on medium speed for 30 seconds, until the butter begins to smooth out a bit. Add the sugar and brown sugar before beating on medium speed until the mixture is completely smooth, approximately 2-4 minutes.
  3. Add the eggs and vanilla extract to the bowl and beat on low for a 10-20 seconds, just until combined. The batter may break up a bit, but don’t worry. It will come together when the dry ingredients are worked into the mix. Scrape down the bowl and beaters if necessary to gather the batter together before continuing.
  4. In a small bowl, combine the flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda, and chocolate chips. Stir to mix the dry ingredients.
  5. Add the dry ingredients in one addition to the mixer bowl. Mix on low speed until the dry ingredients have completely integrated into the dough. This should only take 30-60 seconds depending on the strength of your mixer. Take great care not to overmix the dough. Mixing develops the gluten in the flour and overmixing will encourage the dough to become tough.
  6. Transfer the dough to the 9x9 pan, spreading the dough to evenly fill the pan. Add Skippers to the top of the dough, dividing them across the dough evenly. Bake for 25 - 30 minutes, until the cookie dough has browned slightly and has a dry appearance on top. A toothpick inserted into the middle of the pan should come out cleanly or with small crumbs attached when the bars are baked. Rotating the baking sheets halfway through the baking time will help to ensure that the cookies are evenly baked.
  7. Remove the pan from the oven, allowing it to cool to room temperature. As with any cookie, these are even more delicious when eaten while still warm with a cup of coffee or cold glass of milk. They also make a delicious base for a scoop of vanilla ice cream!
Notes
  1. Our family lives and bakes around nut allergies, so our farmhouse kitchen is nut free. This recipe uses one of our nut free favorites: Vermont Nut Free Chocolates. You can learn all about them at www.vermontnutfree.com.
Adapted from Farmhouse Kitchen Chocolate Chip Cookies
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Brisket Braised with Caramelized Onions

Brisket Braised with Caramelized Onions2 BannerDuring the long New England winter, we need comfort on our dinner plates even more than usual.  When snow is piling up outside and the temperatures are bitterly cold, we turn to our favorite rustic recipes to warm us up from the inside out.  If that recipe involves braising something in the oven all afternoon, all the better.  I know that the warmth and delicious aroma emanating from the oven will help us to endure the cold and hold on to the knowledge that spring will eventually arrive.

Like so many cooking methods that have stood the test of time, braising is rustic and simple.  It requires no fancy equipment, only a heavy pot with a lid that can be moved from the stovetop to the oven.  Braising doesn’t involve a lot of hands on time, hours of paying careful attention to the recipe.  Instead, it brilliantly combines two simple tasks:  searing a cut of meat and then allowing that meat to cook slowly in a covered pan until it is tender and infused with flavor.

My culinary idol Julia Child didn’t need many words to explain braising in Mastering the Art of French Cooking.  She simply defines it as “To brown foods in fat, then cook them in a covered casserole with a small amount of liquid.”  I couldn’t possibly explain it any more perfectly or succinctly.  Yes, it really is that simple.

Brisket is a cut of meat perfect suited for braising.  Brisket can be tough if it is hurried, if it isn’t cooked in a way that encourages that sinewy muscle to magically transform into a tender piece of meat and gelatinous broth.  Luckily, braising does just that. 

Braising has become a Sunday ritual in the farmhouse kitchen during the colder months of the year.  In New England, that means more than half of our calendar year.  This week is the first week of spring.  It’s also a week where we watched as snow squalls dropped a fresh layer on the farm’s landscape not once but twice. 

As soon as the first snowstorm arrived, we started discussing what to braise for Sunday dinner.  We can’t control the weather, cannot convince Mother Nature that spring is welcome here and we’ve seen enough wintry snow for a while.  We can look forward to a Sunday afternoon with a brisket braising in the oven all afternoon and the resulting meals for the week. 

We’ve been braising for years, but had never found a brisket recipe that left us craving more.  Then David Lebovitz dropped one right in my newsfeed that looked so promising that we made immediate plans to give it a try.  The recipe was made famous by Nach Waxman, the owner of Kitchen Arts & Letters, a fabulous culinary book shop in New York City.  Since then, it has appeared in several cookbooks. 

The first time we made the recipe, I was skeptical.  It seemed too simple to be anything but ordinary.  I couldn’t have been more wrong.  The results were so delicious that we have since made our own version countless times this winter.  Every single time, I am taken by just how delicious it is, how much flavor each bite contains.  Some recipes are keepers, and this is surely one of them, a foundational recipe to have on hand to make time and time again. 

Over the winter, I’ve adjusted the quantities and timing a bit from the original recipe.  After testing my version many times, we’ve agreed that our version is just to our liking.  It’s delicious and tender every time.  The leftovers are even better 24 or 48 hours later.  We enjoy them on sandwiches spread with a bit of homemade horseradish sauce or tarragon mayonnaise.  I also love to shred a bit of the leftover brisket and serve it with caramelized fennel over a bed of creamy, cheesy grits.  Just writing about it makes my mouth water.  One bite of this brisket and you’ll understand why at our farmhouse, Sundays are for braising.

Brisket Braised with Caramelized Onions
Our version is a bit simpler than the original. I found that the step of salting the meat ahead of time didn’t impact the flavor or texture of the finished dish, so I omitted it. While I do my best to plan ahead, salting the brisket the day before and allowing it to sit overnight in the refrigerator before beginning the recipe simply didn’t happen one Sunday because I had forgotten the night before. When that brisket turned out equally delicious and tender, I decided to cross that preparation right off my recipe. You can certainly give it a try and see if you find it to be noticeably different. Over the winter, I’ve adjusted the quantities and timing a bit from the original recipe. After testing my version many times, we’ve agreed that our version is just to our liking. It’s delicious and tender every time. The leftovers are even better 24 or 48 hours later. We enjoy them on sandwiches spread with a bit of homemade horseradish sauce or tarragon mayonnaise. I also love to shred a bit of the leftover brisket and serve it with caramelized fennel over a bed of creamy, cheesy grits. Just writing about it makes my mouth water. One bite of this brisket and you’ll understand why at our farmhouse, Sundays are for braising.
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Ingredients
  1. 4-6 pounds beef brisket
  2. kosher or sea salt
  3. 1-2 Tablespoons All-purpose flour
  4. 1 Tablespoon lard
  5. 2 pounds thinly sliced onions (approximately 6-8 medium onions)
  6. 4 Tablespoons tomato paste
  7. 6 cloves garlic, sliced thinly
  8. 4 large carrots, peeled and diced
  9. salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Pat the brisket dry with a paper towel. Salt liberally. Sprinkle the brisket with the flour, using as much as is necessary to dust the entire surface.
  2. Prepare the onions, garlic, and carrots. They will be used in separate steps, so keep the garlic and carrots separate from the onions.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Place a large oven safe pot or roasting pan with a lid over medium-high heat. I like to use my cast iron or enameled cast iron Dutch oven, but any heavy pot with a lid that is safe to move from stovetop to oven will do the job.
  4. Add the lard to the warm pan, swirling to coat the bottom evenly. Add the brisket to the pan and sear on both sides. Five minutes per side should be enough to sear and lightly brown the brisket. Remove the brisket to a large plate or dish to rest as you caramelize the onions.
  5. Lower the heat to medium and add the onions to the pan. Season with a salt and black pepper and stir to coat them with the fat in the pan. Cook them for 15-20 minutes, stirring frequently to prevent them from sticking. They should soften and become translucent before taking on the golden brown color of caramelized onions. If they stick to the pan, you can add a bit more lard or a little water to the pan.
  6. Turn off the heat. Spread the onions evenly in the bottom of the pan to create a bed for the brisket. Add the brisket back to the pan along with any juices that have collected as it rested. Spread the tomato paste evenly on the top surface of the brisket. Add the garlic and carrots to the top of the brisket, allowing any excess to fall to the bed of onions below. Season with salt and pepper. Place the lid on your pan and transfer to the warm oven. Cook for 90 minutes.
  7. Remove the pot from the oven. Remove the lid and allow the brisket to rest for 10 minutes. Transfer the brisket to a large cutting board or large platter. Slicing against the grain, portion the brisket into ½ inch slices. Transfer the slices back to the braising pot, nestling them into the onions and overlapping them if necessary to fit. Replace the lid and transfer back to the oven to braise for another 90 minutes.
  8. Remove the pot from the oven. Allow the brisket to rest for 10 minutes before serving. The pot will remain hot, keeping the brisket and onions warm while allowing the meat to rest. Serve the brisket, spooning onions, carrots, and garlic from the pan over each serving. I often serve this brisket with a homemade horseradish sauce made by stirring together sour cream and horseradish to our liking and seasoning with a bit of salt and pepper.
  9. Any leftover brisket and vegetables can be stored in the refrigerator. The flavor will improve overnight, making for delicious leftovers the next day. Warming the leftovers in the vegetables and sauce will prevent the brisket from drying out as it is reheated.
Adapted from Nach Waxman’s Beef Brisket shared by David Lebovitz
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Celebrate Pi Day with our Favorite Pie Recipes

PiDayRecipesCollageEach year, we celebrate Pi Day on March 14th by enjoying a homemade pie together here at 1840 Farm.  The day is publicized in the hope of inviting us to all learn more about the mathematical significance of Pi and the importance of math in our daily lives.  I’m happy to extol the virtues of math, especially if I can do so by spending time in the farmhouse kitchen making my favorite dish for our family table.

More than celebrating pi’s mathematical importance, I like to celebrate the power of pie to bring our family together.  When we gather in our farmhouse kitchen to bake or enjoy a warm slice of pie, it’s impossible to ignore the power of food to bring people together.  Indeed, you really can feed the soul with a homemade slice of pie.

I have a deep rooted love for pie.  I love to make it, I love to serve it, and I especially love to eat it.  Every bite reminds me of sitting in my grandmother’s kitchen as a little girl.  She was an accomplished pie baker and I was always greeted with not one, but two or three homemade pies when we visited her.

Those pie memories are certainly responsible for my unabashed love for pie.  Since today is Pi Day, it’s the perfect day to share a few of my favorite pie recipes and posts with you.  I hope that you’ll use these recipes to make a pie for someone you love. 

Throughout the year, we enjoy pies of every sort.  Our annual Kentucky Derby Day celebration would seem incomplete without a homemade Bourbon Peach Pie.  Summer is marked by raspberry season and always includes the promise of a Double Crusted Raspberry Pie.  When fall’s apple season arrives at our local farmer’s market, I find myself dreaming of a slice of Brandied Apple Pie topped with a generous scoop of vanilla ice cream. 

Our Thanksgiving celebration always includes Chocolate Bourbon Pecan Pie that we make nut free here in our nut free farmhouse.  If you don’t bake around nut allergies, you can substitute pecans with delicious results. 

When we’re craving something chocolatey, Chocolate Cream Pie always delivers.  It’s the perfect pie for making ahead of time and using up our supply of fresh eggs.  If you’re hesitant to make a traditional pie crust, this recipe is for you.  The graham cracker crust is a simple way to make a delicious pie without any need for a rolling pin.

I also love to make savory pies.  One of my favorites is our Heirloom Tomato Pie that we make when our beloved heirloom tomatoes are fresh and in season.  The crust is flaky and every bite is filled with the intense earthy flavor of the heirloom tomatoes we love.

If you prefer cake to pie, then Boston Cream Pie will be just what the doctor ordered.  This cake has a fascinating story behind the reason for being called a pie in spite of the fact that it is clearly a cake.  No matter what you call it, a slice of it is delicious.

I hope that you will join in the celebration and add one of these pie recipes to your plans in the coming days.  I’ve included a few pie crust making tips for good measure.  I receive so many messages from readers who are intimidated by the thought of making a homemade pie crust.  Using these tips, you will make a deliciously flaky pie crust that will delight your friends and family, I promise!

Happy Pi Day!

 

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