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Farmhouse Style Valentine’s Day Favorites

ValentineBasket Card RecipeHere at 1840 Farm, we’re counting down the days until Valentine’s Day.  We’ve been making dozens of our heart shaped baskets and sending them on their way to customers from coast to coast.  We’ve also been dreaming of getting into the farmhouse kitchen to make up a few of our favorite Valentine’s Day treats.   Now I just have to decide which recipe to make first!

We have highlighted our favorite Valentine’s Day recipes in the photo gallery below.  These are the recipes we love to share with friends and family to celebrate the holiday that is all about taking time to tell those people near and dear to you just how important they are.  From dark chocolate butter cookies and brownies to delicious buttercream frosting flavored with a bit of a great stout beer, you’re sure to find something to put a smile on your Valentine’s face.

You can access any of the posts by clicking on the photos below. Happy Valentine’s Day!

 

 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2016/02/valentinesday/

1840 Farmhouse Table 365

Pastrami Sandwich at 1840 FarmIf you follow us on Facebook and  Instagram, you may have noticed that I’ve been sharing photos with #1840farmhousetable365 each day. I decided that I will share at least one photo of something that we’re enjoying at our farmhouse table each day in 2016. Some days, there may be more than one post, but I promise to share at least one each and every day.
 
I’m hoping that sharing these posts will give you a bird’s eye view of what we’re eating at our farmhouse table. It’s far too easy to only share the most spectacular meals, giving the impression that we never eat takeout pizza, never decide to happily have a simple egg sandwich for dinner. Believe me, we do.  In the interest of being more transparent, I’ll be sharing the simple and sublime along with everything in between.
 
I believe that food is important and that being connected to your food is even more important. I also believe that sharing food with someone near and dear to you can elevate the simplest food to the most memorable meal.  The food that we eat matters, but the manner in which we eat is even more critical. Taking time to sit down, eat together, and share the news of our day is my favorite time of day.  I hope that you’ll enjoy sharing a bit of that with me by following along all year.
 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2016/01/1840farmhousetable365/

Farmhouse Style Cast Iron Skillet Meatloaf

Farmhouse Style Cast Iron Skillet Meatloaf

In my book, there’s nothing more comforting on a cold winter’s night than meatloaf and mashed potatoes. If that meatloaf can be prepared in a cast iron skillet, all the better. Comfort food from a cast iron skillet is just the sort of farmhouse style comfort food my family clamors for on a wintry New England day.

A cast iron skillet is perfectly suited for making meatloaf. It holds the heat well, ensuring that the meatloaf bakes evenly. The same skillet can be used to sauté the vegetables and herbs that will be incorporated into the meatloaf before being used to bake the meatloaf in the oven. Reducing the number of dishes I need to use and clean while prepping dinner is always a welcome development in my kitchen.

Once you’ve made this cast iron skillet meatloaf, you’ll be left wondering why you ever baked meatloaf in a loaf pan. My loaf pan may be feeling a bit lonely, because I’ve never made meatloaf in that pan since discovering that I could bake it so perfectly in my cast iron skillet!

Farmhouse Style Cast Iron Skillet Meatloaf
Serves 6
I like to incorporate Italian sausage into the ground beef or buffalo that I use in this recipe. The combination results in a wonderfully seasoned, delicious meatloaf. If you like more spice, you could certainly use spicy Italian sausage with equally delicious results. I often double this recipe and use my large 12 inch cast iron skillet to bake a larger meatloaf. Then I am able to look forward to serving leftovers the next night. Like most savory dishes, this meatloaf is even more delicious the second night!
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Cook Time
1 hr
Cook Time
1 hr
Ingredients
  1. 1 Tablespoon lard
  2. 1 Large onion, finely diced
  3. 3 garlic cloves, minced
  4. 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  5. 1 teaspoon dried rosemary
  6. 8 ounces Italian sausage, removed from the casing
  7. 16 ounces ground grass fed beef or buffalo
  8. 1 Tablespoon tomato paste
  9. 1/3 cup old fashioned oats
  10. 2 large eggs
  11. 2 ounces mozzarella cheese, shredded
  12. ¼ cup ketchup
  13. 1 Tablespoon soy sauce
  14. 1 Tablespoon brown sugar
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  2. Warm an 8-9 inch cast iron skillet over medium heat. Add the lard, swirling the pan to coat the bottom surface of the skillet. Add the onions and cook until translucent. Add the garlic, thyme, and rosemary, stirring for one minute to prevent the garlic from burning. Remove the pan from the heat.
  3. In a large bowl, combine the ground beef or buffalo with the Italian sausage that has been removed from its casing. Add the tomato paste, sautéed onion mixture, oats, and eggs. Mix to fully combine the ingredients.
  4. Transfer about half of the mixture to the cast iron skillet, pressing to evenly cover the bottom of the skillet. Sprinkle the shredded mozzarella cheese over the top before covering with the remaining ground meat mixture. Press the meat mixture to the edges of the skillet. The mixture should reach the edges of the skillet and be an even thickness to ensure that it will bake evenly.
  5. In a small bowl, combine the ketchup, soy sauce, and brown sugar. Spread this mixture over the top of the ground meat. Transfer the skillet to the warm oven and bake for 50 to 60 minutes. When the meatloaf is finished, it will begin to pull away from the edges of the pan and register at 160 degrees on a meat thermometer.
  6. Remove the meatloaf from the oven and allow to cool for five minutes before slicing into wedges and serving. We love to enjoy this meatloaf with Colcannon Style Mashed Potatoes. The combination of meatloaf, potatoes, and cabbage is a favorite at our farmhouse table.
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To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2016/01/farmhouse-style-cast-iron-skillet-meatloaf/

1840 Farmhouse DIY: Glittery Pumpkins

1840 Farmhoue DIYA few weeks ago, I promised to share a few simple projects to help decorate your Thanksgiving table. First up are these glittery pumpkins.  Our Thanksgiving holiday just wouldn’t seem complete without them.

We have been using these glittery pumpkins to decorate the farmhouse for years. They are on display from late September until we put away the fall decor to decorate for Christmas. These pumpkins are ideally suited for decorating your home for fall and bringing a little sparkle to your Thanksgiving table. We have a pair in the farmhouse kitchen, a few in the dining room, and I love to keep a couple in my studio.  They catch the sunlight shining in through the window behind my sewing machine and brighten up my space.

This is a simple project that the kids will love helping with. My daughter helped me make these many years ago. The steps are simple to follow, don’t require any potentially dangerous tools, and the active time needed to complete them is short. Add in the fun of painting with glue and liberally applying sparkly glitter, and it’s easy to see why kids will love helping to create these fabulous pumpkins.

While it was many years ago when my young daughter helped me to make our glittery little pumpkins, I think of that moment in time every time I see them. It’s really no wonder that I look forward to decorating the farmhouse with them every year.  I hope that you will making and decorating your home with these glittery little pumpkins as much as we do here at 1840 Farm!

Glittery Decorative Pumpkins

Craft pumpkins are available in a variety of shapes and sizes.  I find that they are deeply discounted as soon as Halloween has passed. When selecting glue, choose one that dries clear in order to allow the color of the pumpkin to be visible. While any color of glitter can be used, I prefer to use clear glitter in order to allow the color of the pumpkin to shine through.

Glittery Pumpkins at 1840 Farm Glittery Pumpkin at 1840 Farm Glittery Pumpkins at 1840 Farm

Glittery Pumpkin Supplies at 1840 Farm Glue on Glittery Pumpkins at 1840 Farm Applying Glitter to Pumpkins at 1840 Farm

Materials and Tools Needed

Craft pumpkins
Clear drying glue
Brush for applying glue
Glitter

I like to cover my work surface with freezer paper before beginning a project that involves paint or glue.  The nonstick surface makes cleanup a breeze.  I also like to apply the glitter over a large plastic container.  The large container will catch any excess glitter.  This way, no glitter goes to waste as I can reuse that glitter to apply to the next pumpkin or return it to the container of glitter for my next project.

Remove any labels from the craft pumpkins as the clear drying glue and clear glitter will allow them to show through.  Apply an even layer of glue to the bottom of a pumpkin.  Sprinkle glitter over the glue, shaking the pumpkin lightly to remove any excess glitter.  Set the pumpkin upside down to dry fully.  Repeat with other pumpkins until they have all had glitter applied to their bottom surface.  When dry, the glue will be clear.

After the bottoms of the pumpkins are completely dry and no longer tacky, apply glue to the remaining surface of each pumpkin.  Sprinkle glitter liberally over the glue, shaking lightly to remove excess glitter.  Repeat with the other pumpkins and set aside until the pumpkins are completely dry.  Touch up any bare spots if needed, adding more glue and glitter to fully cover the surface of the pumpkins.

We have used our glittery pumpkins for many years and find that they have retained their fabulous glittery appearance.  When fall gives way to Christmas, we wrap each pumpkin in a sheet of tissue paper and pack them away until the next year.


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes and crafts all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes and DIY projects right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

ThanksgivingGallery1111

 


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/1840-farmhouse-diy-glittery-pumpkins/

An 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Celebration

Fall at 1840 Farm

For me, Thanksgiving is a holiday marked by time spent with family gathered around the table and the delicious tastes of our favorite holiday dishes. I have fond childhood memories of Thanksgiving meals prepared by my paternal grandmother and a team of aunts and uncles. The food was delicious and comforting and the conversation was lively. There was laughter and joy at that table and the meal always ended with my grandmother’s homemade pies.

It’s really no wonder that Thanksgiving traditions have remained so strong over the years. A day that combines family, friends, and comforting homemade food is a holiday to cherish. In many ways, our annual celebration is much like the original harvest celebration that took place 400 years ago, a celebration of all that we are grateful for in our daily lives and the marking of the end of another year’s homegrown harvest of fresh food from our gardens.

The Thanksgiving meal has evolved significantly over the years, but its importance has not diminished.  The first feast would have probably featured wild fowl instead of our modern-day turkey. History tells us that there would not have been cranberry sauce, mashed potatoes, or pumpkin pie at that first celebration.  When they sat down to enjoy their meal, the settler’s sugar stores had been depleted, the potato had not yet made its way to North America, and using butter and flour to make a pie crust was a luxury far beyond their wildest imagination.ThanksgivingSquashDecor

Instead, their celebration would have revolved around food that was seasonal,  rustic, simple, and local.  Most likely, it would have featured venison and seafood that had been hunted and caught by the men of the group along with corn, beans, and squash from the land that they had tended during the growing season.  The celebration took place over a series of days instead of at a single meal.

By the mid-1800s, sage dressing and mashed potatoes had begun to take their place on a traditional Thanksgiving table.  In 1863, Abraham Lincoln made Thanksgiving a national holiday.  Since then, we have been marking the day and celebrating with our favorite dishes.

Three generations of my family will gather around our farmhouse table for our Thanksgiving meal in a house that was built at a time before Thanksgiving was declared a national holiday.  I will inevitably turn my thoughts towards all that I am thankful for.  The list is too long to mention, but family, friends, and our life here on the farm are all at the top of my list.

I am also thankful for you, Dear Reader.  You have inspired me to continue telling my family’s story and have returned the favor by sharing yours.  I have enjoyed learning about your farms and families as much as I have enjoyed sharing news from mine.  So, on this holiday that celebrates family, friends, and food enjoyed together, I wish you a day overflowing with all three.  I hope that you have a holiday filled to the brim with laughter, memories in the making, and those nearest and dearest to you.

 

 


Here’s a peek at a few of the recipes and crafts that will be found on our Thanksgiving table.  I’ll be adding new recipes and DIY projects right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

You can click on any of the photos to visit the original post so that you can add them to your celebration.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/1840farm_thanksgiving/

1840 Farmhouse Style Sweet Potatoes Anna

Sweet Potatoes Anna Ingredients at 1840 FarmWhen I was asked to create a recipe to help showcase Castello Cheese to promote their Unlock Your Inner Chef Sweepstakes and the release of the new movie Burnt, I couldn’t wait to head into the farmhouse kitchen and get started. I love blue cheese. In fact, it might be my favorite type of cheese. I also love a good movie, especially if it involves food. Many of my favorite films highlight the ability of food to feed the soul and rebuild the spirit.SweetPotatoAnnaSlices at 1840 Farm

The movie Burnt opened in theaters last week. It tells the tale of a chef played by Bradley Cooper who loses his way while working in Paris. As the movie progresses, his character finds himself and self-redemption in the food that he creates. The food is a worthy co-star in the film, with beautifully crafted dishes appearing on the plate.

The cuisine featured in the film is classical French, so I wanted to create a modern, farmhouse style approach for a recipe that appears in the film. After carefully considering my options, I decided to put my seasonal New England spin on the Pommes Anna with Extra Cream Danish Blue Cheese showcased in the movie.

I first came to know the classic preparation for Pommes Anna through my culinary idol Julia Child. She describes the dish in her epic tome Mastering the Art of French Cooking Volume Two. She introduces the recipe by sharing that it was “created during the era of Napoleon III and named, as were many culinary triumphs in those days, after one of the grande cocotte of the period.” I can almost hear Julia’s trilling voice telling the tale. Legend has it that Pommes (potatoes) Anna was indeed named after a beautiful young woman who visited the palace’s court during the reign of Napoleon III.

SweetPotatoAnnawithBlueCheese at 1840 FarmThe traditional dish is a delicate preparation of waxy potatoes and clarified butter. I wanted to stay true to the spirit of the classic dish while featuring the best of what is in season this time of year. Local white potatoes are available, but I couldn’t help thinking of beautiful sweet potatoes. I had a hunch that I could prepare sweet potatoes in the classic style of Pommes Anna but cooked simply in a cast iron skillet. It seemed like the perfect combination of classic French technique and rustic farmhouse cooking.

The resulting dish is delicious and beautiful. It is full of the earthy flavor of sweet potatoes and accented by the butter and herbs layered between the thin slices. The cast iron skillet provides even heat, producing a beautiful dish that is cooked through yet retains its shape and looks stunning on the plate.

The Castello Cheese Danish Blue Cheese Crumbles sprinkled on top provides the perfect bright accent for the sweet potatoes. The creamy, tangy texture and flavor transform this dish from delicious to spectacular. I hope that you’ll enjoy serving this stunning dish to your friends and family as much as I do. It’s so delicious that it might just make an appearance on our Thanksgiving table this year.

I also hope that you’ll visit Castello’s Burnt campaign page to enter their Unlock Your Inner Chef Sweepstakes. You’ll find a collection of delicious recipes from the film and great prizes including a private cooking class for two and a year’s worth of Castello cheese. I entered and hope that you will too!

 

1840 Farmhouse Style Sweet Potatoes (Pommes) AnnaSweetPotatoAnnaOven at 1840 Farm
Serves 4-6 as a side dish

I like to prepare this recipe in my 12 inch cast iron skillet. It can also be cooked in a large skillet that can withstand the 425 degree heat of the oven. The classic preparation of this dish calls for the potatoes to be peeled, but I prefer to leave the peel on my sweet potatoes. I like to incorporate the beautiful contrast in color and nutritional benefits of the skins into the finished dish. If you prefer, the potatoes can be peeled. The results will be equally delicious.

4 pounds medium sized sweet potatoes
4 Tablespoons butter
2 Tablespoons fresh minced herbs (rosemary, thyme, and sage)
sea salt
pepper
Castello Cheese Danish Blue Cheese crumbles

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees Fahrenheit. Using a sharp knife, carefully slice the sweet potatoes into slices that are approximately 1/8” thick. Mince the fresh herbs and set aside.

Heat the large skillet over medium low heat. Add the butter and cook until completely melted. Remove the skillet from the heat and pour the butter off into a small bowl. Using a heat safe brush, fully coat the bottom and sides of the pan with melted butter to prevent the potatoes from sticking.

Arrange a layer of the sweet potato slices on the bottom of the skillet, overlapping to fully cover the skillet’s surface. Brush the layer with the melted butter before seasoning with a sprinkling of the minced herbs and a bit of salt and pepper. Add a second layer of sweet potato slices to fully cover the first layer. Brush the second layer with melted butter and season with herbs, salt, and pepper. Continue layering until all of the potatoes are used. Brush the top layer with butter and sprinkle the remaining herbs on top. Season with salt and pepper.

SweetPotatoAnnaSkilletStackButter one side of a piece of aluminum foil large enough to fully cover the pan. Place the foil buttered side down on top of the potatoes. Place another slightly smaller oven safe skillet on top of the foil. The weight of the smaller skillet will help to hold the layers of sweet potatoes in place and help the dish to retain its shape as it cooks.

Place the dish in the warm oven and bake for 25 minutes. Remove the dish from the oven. At this point, the top skillet can be removed and the foil can be carefully peeled back using a spatula if necessary to separate it from the top layer of sweet potato slices.

Return the pan to the oven and bake uncovered for 20 to 30 minutes. When finished, the potatoes should be tender yet hold their shape. They will begin to take on a beautiful caramelized color as they finish baking.

Remove the pan from the oven. Cut into wedges and serve topped with a sprinkling of Castello blue cheese. The heat from the sweet potatoes will melt the cheese, creating a beautiful and delicious dish that you’ll be proud to serve at your family table.


This post was sponsored by Castello Cheese.  We’re thrilled to have the opportunity to share new brands and products with our readers.  1840 Farm abides by word of mouth marketing standards. We believe in honesty of relationship, opinion and identity.  Compensation received from sponsors will not influence the topics or posts made on this blog.  Sponsored posts will be clearly labeled as such. Product reviews will include our honest opinions about the product(s) reviewed.  Products that do not meet our standards of daily use on our farm will not be reviewed. Samples of the products that I review (or reimbursements) are sent to me at no expense in order to allow me to use the product and evaluate its performance.  The framework of our review process does not guarantee a positive review in exchange for the product provided.  Our product reviews contain both facts about the product and my personal opinion of its performance while it was used at 1840 Farm.


I love to share my favorite products from our 1840 Farmhouse Kitchen.  Here are the tools and ingredients I used when creating this recipe.  I know that you will love using them as much as I do.

 

 


 

This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes and crafts all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes and DIY projects right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

ThanksgivingGallery1114

 


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice from around the web, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


 

.

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/11/1840-farmhouse-style-sweet-potatoes-anna/

The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter

OctNewsletterWe’re thrilled that you would like to have The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter delivered to your Email inbox.  Subscribing to our newsletter is the best way to ensure that you don’t miss our favorite seasonal recipes, special offers from our sponsors, and our new series of Farmhouse DIY projects.

 

It’s easy to subscribe.  Just visit our subscription form.  In a few seconds, you’ll be the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.  Welcome!  While you’re there, you can visit the link to all of our past issues and see what you’ve been missing!

 


Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/newsletter/

1840 Farm Paper & Ink – Strawberry Season

1840 Farm Paper and InkMy family knows all too well the depth of my love of paper and ink.  They indulge me in this lifelong love, following along as I meander through fine stationery and paper shops like other women browse in jewelry stores.  They know that I love to look at every type of paper, feeling the thickness and gazing at the colors before selecting something to bring home and add to my stash of papers and pens.

I have loved putting pen or pencil to paper since I was a very young girl.  I love to write.  I always have.  As a child, I used to sit with a pencil and a notebook and watch as the words filled page after page with stories and poems.  When I paused to search for the words to continue, I often found myself doodling some sort of small drawing.  That habit has continued to the present, with most of my notes and lists including a few drawings and doodles.

I also love to send a handwritten card or note to friends and family.  There’s something magical about sending my heart and soul anywhere in the world for the cost of a postage stamp.  I love being on the receiving end of that equation every bit as much as I enjoy sending warm heartfelt wishes to someone I love.

My love for paper, ink, and embracing the art of handwritten correspondence have all played a role in providing the inspiration for our newest line of handmade products for The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop.  It’s time for me to introduce you to 1840 Farm Paper & Ink.  I hope that you will enjoy using these products as much as I have loved creating them.1840 Farm Paper & Ink Strawberry Season

The items in our Paper & Ink line will feature my original drawings and celebrate the seasonality of life here at 1840 Farm.  From the fresh produce we harvest from our gardens during the warmer months to the activities that keep us busy inside the farmhouse during the long New England winter, these paper products will reflect the beauty of every month and season.

The first member of our Paper & Ink Collection celebrates Strawberry Season. I worked with my original paper and pencil drawing of a berry basket filled with fresh ripe strawberries,  transforming each curve and line into a digital file.  That digital artwork was used to create both the signature drawing featured on the front of each card and the pattern used to line the envelopes. Each card and notecard will be printed to order and cut by hand.  Each envelope will be embellished by hand with a custom paper liner.

Look for the Paper & Ink Collection to be added to The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop in the coming days.  In July, we’ll be adding a new design to the collection.  We can’t wait to share and celebrate each season of our lives here at 1840 Farm with you through this new Paper & Ink Collection!


To make sure that you don’t miss any of our original content or favorite recipes, DIY projects, and homesteading advice, subscribe to The 1840 Farm Community Newsletter. Visit our subscription form to become the newest member of The 1840 Farm Community.

Our newsletter isn’t the only way to follow what’s happening here at 1840 Farm.
You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm
and at The 1840 Farm Mercantile Shop on Etsy.
You can also find 1840 Farm throughout the social media universe on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Instagram, Flickr, and Bloglovin‘.

We even created a new 1840 Farm Community Newsletter Pinterest board to catalog
our newsletter content so that you could easily pin your favorites to your own boards.

Come add your voice to our conversation!
We’ll hope to see you there!


 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2015/06/1840-farm-paper-ink-strawberry-season/

Welcome to 1840 Farm

You’re always welcome at 1840 Farm and we’re thrilled that you stopped by for a visit!  We have highlighted our favorite Valentine’s Day recipes and posts to make it easier for you to find exactly what you’re looking for.   You can access any of the posts by clicking on the photos below.

 

 

 


We hope that you’ll enjoy our most recent posts:

 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/

Vitamix Pro 750 Passes the 1840 Farmhouse Test

For years, I have heard from professional and home cooks about the wonders of the Vitamix.  Chefs extol its virtues in their professional kitchens.  Home cooks like myself are just as taken with its abilities.  From their accounts, it seemed that there wasn’t anything that the Vitamix couldn’t handle.

Several weeks ago, our sponsor JL Hufford sent me a Vitamix Pro 750 to test in our 1840 Farmhouse kitchen.  Finally, I would be able to form my own opinion about the Vitamix.  From the moment I began to unpack the unit from its box, I was taken with the sturdy construction.  This is a very solidly constructed piece of equipment.

Once I had unpacked the Vitamix, it was time to put it to work in our kitchen.  First up was one of my son’s favorite beverages, our homemade take on the Orange Julius.  We’ve been making this recipe for years in our standard blender.  Unfortunately, we have never been able to achieve that frothy, smooth texture that we hoped for using our blender.  No matter how long we blended the ingredients, it just didn’t become a homogeneous mixture.VitamixOrangeSq

So, we gathered the ingredients, placed them in the Vitamix container, and selected the smoothie setting.  We turned on the power and watched as the ingredients were effortlessly transformed into that frothy, silky consistency that we had tried so hard to achieve in the past.  After pouring the mixture from the container, I added warm water and a touch of dish soap, returned the container to the base, and powered it on using the cleaning setting.  In moments, the unit was clean, needing only a quick rinse with fresh water to remove the soapy solution.

During that first week, we used the Vitamix Pro 750 to blend many other smoothies, soups, and liquids.  We made a recipe of our Smoky Chili Puree to flavor a batch of Black Bean Chili.  In seconds, the tomatoes and chilies in the container were pureed and smooth.  It was clear that liquids were no match for the VItamix.

Now that we had established the ability of the Vitamix to handle smoothies, sauces, and soups, it was time to move on to processing items that weren’t liquid based.  First up was a batch of pizza dough.  I would have never thought of making pizza dough in this machine before reading the extensive 350 page cookbook that was included in the package.  The Vitamix effortlessly transformed the ingredients into a smooth ball of pizza dough.

After pizza dough, I set out to make a family favorite using the Vitamix.  It was time to make a Gooey Butter Cake.  The Vitamix powered through the buttery crust without any trouble.  Next up was the gooey mixture of cream cheese, butter, and powdered sugar.  I’ve made this recipe dozens of times, but both my stand mixer and food processor fail to create a completely smooth mixture.  No matter how long I allow the butter and cream cheese to come to room temperature, no matter how long I blend or process the ingredients, lumps are still present.

After placing the ingredients in the Vitamix container, I processed it on setting 3.  After the blade had stopped, I removed the lid to inspect the mixture.  It was completely velvety and smooth.  There wasn’t a single lump in sight.  The Vitamix had done what my blender, stand mixer, and food processor had failed to do.  It was official:  I was now a member of the contingent of cooks who believe that the Vitamix can handle anything.  This machine had passed the1840 Farmhouse test with flying colors.

I am very grateful that JL Hufford allowed me to put the Vitamix Pro 750 to the test.  It passed every challenge I gave it and earned my resounding seal of approval.  I’m even more grateful that they’re offering a special 10% savings on this amazing machine to the members of our 1840 Farm Community!  This is a limited time offer, so don’t delay.  If you’ve been dreaming of adding a Vitamix to your kitchen’s arsenal or giving one as a gift, this is an amazing opportunity to save.

Visit JL Hufford and enter the coupon code “skyhigh10″ to save 10% on your purchase of the Vitamix Pro 750 until 12/14/14.  I hope that you’ll take advantage of this amazing savings and then you’ll share with me what delicious dishes you’re making using your new Vitamix.  Until then, here are the recipes that we tested with our Vitamix.  Enjoy!

OrangeGeniusSqSmokyChiliSq

PizzaDoughSqGooeyButterSq

 

Permanent link to this article: http://1840farm.com/2014/12/vitamixpro750/

1840 Farmhouse Brioche

I first made brioche bread about a dozen years ago. I made it out of necessity. I loved the taste and texture of brioche bread, but didn’t have a local bakery that turned out those lovely golden loaves. While Standard Baking Co. in Portland, Maine creates fantastic brioche, driving two hours for bread (no matter how delicious) seemed a bit extreme.

Photo Sep 28, 9 47 42 AMSo, I went to the farmhouse kitchen armed with one of my favorite cookbooks: Baking with Julia. I read the detailed recipe and followed its instructions to the letter. It was a somewhat disarming undertaking giving the precision of the directions. I pressed on, inspired by the promise of creating my own brioche loaves right here in our farmhouse.

Traditional brioche is baked from dough enriched by fresh eggs and butter. Each addition must be perfectly timed before advancing to the next step. If these steps are rushed, the dough will break apart, forming several small clumps that will resist coming back together into one congruous ball of dough. Yet care must be taken not to over mix the dough as too much mixing can ruin the airy texture that makes brioche so wonderful.

Once the eggs have been successfully integrated into the dough, butter must be added in much the same way. It is added a bit at a time, allowing the butter to fully blend with the dough. This process can take thirty minutes or more. All of this kneading puts a heavy toll on a stand mixer. As the dough is kneaded, the mixer must be monitored to ensure that it does not overheat or, worse yet, burn out completely. Kneading this dough for such a long time is a herculean task for a residential kitchen’s mixer.

My first few batches of brioche were made with great success. They were delicious in every way and a big hit with my family. It seemed that I 10336599_733865503347292_2681057661619279851_nhad conquered this dough and learned how to make loaves of delicious brioche bread. I delighted in the knowledge that we would have brioche whenever we wanted without the need for a two hour road trip.

I continued to mix up batches of brioche dough regularly. I heeded the warning within the recipe. I took care to judiciously pace the half hour of mixing, stopping if the mixer seemed to be approaching the point of overheating or causing damage to the motor.

And then, one day as I was finishing a batch of dough, the motor ground to an abrupt halt. It cried uncle and refused to do anything other than emit a high pitched grinding noise when I turned the motor on. My mixer had seen its last batch of brioche dough. I was afraid that I might have also seen mine.

I tried in vain to repair the mixer’s worn gear to no avail. Next, I did what any serious baker would do. I started saving for a new mixer. When the day finally came that Mr. 1840 Farm treated me to the wonderful surprise of a replacement mixer, I couldn’t wait to make a batch of brioche bread.

I was a bit hesitant. I worried that working my beloved dough would put my latest mixer in jeopardy. My fear of a repeat performance led me to wonder if I might be able to simplify the brioche recipe to require less precision from me and less muscle from my mixer’s motor.

Photo Aug 04, 9 19 31 AMI tried several times to simplify the recipe by consolidating steps and simplifying the recipe without sacrificing the flavor and texture of the traditional brioche that I love so much. Most of the loaves were edible, but did not resemble brioche at all. A few of the loaves were painfully dense and decidedly inedible.

While I am fairly confident in my baking abilities, I began to wonder if it was time to give up. Thankfully, I didn’t. Instead, I decided to abandon most of what I knew about the techniques that I had used to create traditional brioche.  I focused on the dough itself. I set out to create a heavily enriched dough that would yield a baked loaf with brioche’s hallmark golden, papery thin crust and rich, airy texture.

Gradually, I made minor changes to the proportions of the ingredients and the method I used to create the dough. Several batches later, the loaves were exactly as I had hoped. The crust was golden and flaky and surrounded an interior that was light and punctuated with the rich flavor of eggs and butter.

My mixer had survived this bread experiment and so had I. Better yet, my family had delicious brioche bread to enjoy that was everything we hoped it would be. To celebrate, I did what any dedicated bread baker would do: I started working on a new recipe.  I’m hoping to develop a brioche recipe that will incorporate our freshly milled whole wheat flour. Don’t worry; I’ll share that recipe with you as soon as I finish testing it!

1840 Farmhouse Brioche
Makes two loaves

I find that adding Grandma Eloise’s Dough Enhancer helps to extend the shelf life of my homemade loaves by several days, but if you don’t have it on hand, you can omit it from the recipe.  The resulting loaf will still be delicious, but the texture will be slightly more dense and the shelf life will be several days shorter.  You can learn more about the dough enhancer on my recipe for our Farmhouse Country Loaf.

12 ounces (1 ¾ cup) warm waterPhoto Aug 03, 9 32 44 PM
21 grams (1 Tablespoon) honey
4 teaspoons active dry yeast
1 Tablespoon salt
1 Tablespoon Dough Enhancer
840 grams (7 cups) All-purpose flour
3 large eggs, room temperature
4 ounces (1 stick) butter, grated

If you are using a dough proofer, preheat the proofer following the manufacturer’s instructions as you prepare the dough.   Whisk the warm water and honey in the bowl of a large stand mixer. Sprinkle the yeast over the top of the liquid. Allow the yeast to rest as you prepare the remaining ingredients.

In a medium bowl, combine the salt, dough enhancer (if using), and flour. Grate the butter and set aside. In a small bowl, whisk the eggs until smooth.

Add the eggs to the bowl with the warm water and honey. Whisk until combined. Mount the bowl on the mixer’s base and attach the dough hook. Add the dry ingredients all in one addition before turning the mixer’s motor on low speed.

Photo Aug 03, 10 52 09 PMMix for a few minutes, until the dough begins to take shape. The dough will appear to be slightly dry. With the motor running, begin adding the grated butter a bit at a time, allowing the butter to be incorporated into the dough before adding more. Continue this process until all of the butter has been added.

Stop the mixer and asses the dough. It should be shiny and moist, but not excessively sticky. The ball of dough should be smooth and elastic. If it is too sticky, simply start the mixer and gradually add up to ½ cup of All-purpose flour to the dough. Take care not to add too much flour as it will yield a finished loaf that is too dry.

Transfer the dough to a large buttered bowl to rise in a dough proofer or a warm, draft free location.  Allow the dough to rise until it has nearly doubled in size. Using my dough proofer set at 82 degrees, this takes approximately 45 to 60 minutes.

Once the dough has nearly doubled in size, divide it into two equal sections. Form each section into a loaf and place in a buttered or oiled loaf pan. Be sure to oil the top rim of the loaf pan as this dough has a tendency to rise well above the top of the pan. Oiling the top rim of the pan will make releasing the baked loaf from the pan much easier.10600412_733618986705277_6540797265334883724_n

Transfer the two loaves back to the proofing chamber or warm, draft free location for rising. Allow the loaves to rise until they have reached a height of more than one inch above the top edge of the loaf pans.  Using my dough proofer, this takes about one 60 – 90 minutes.

As the dough nears the end of its rise, preheat the oven to 350 degrees.  If you have a pizza stone, this is a great time to put it to use.  I like to use stones when baking bread in order to deliver even heat to the bottom of the loaf as it bakes.  I find that my loaves bake more evenly when I have the stones in the oven during preheating and baking.

Once the loaves have risen sufficiently and the oven has reached the proper temperature, transfer the loaves to the oven.  Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, turning near the halfway mark to ensure even browning.  When the loaves are fully baked, they will be golden brown and sound hollow when tapped on the bottom.  Remove the baked loaves from their pans to a wire rack. Allow them to cool completely before slicing or storing.

Don’t miss my post about the best way to store fresh bread to learn how you should be storing your fresh loaf of bread.


I love to share my favorite products from our 1840 Farmhouse Kitchen.  Here are the tools I used when creating this recipe.  I know that you will love using them as much as I do.

 


This post is included in our 1840 Farmhouse Thanksgiving Gallery.
You’ll find our favorite Thanksgiving recipes and crafts all gathered in one place so that you can easily include them in your family’s celebration.  I’ll be adding new recipes and DIY projects right up until the big day, so check back to see even more delicious and fabulous Thanksgiving posts.

 

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In the Studio at 1840 Farm

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